Monday, January 18th 2016

Corsair Unveils its Fastest Ever 128GB, 64GB and 32GB DDR4 Kits

Corsair, a world leader in enthusiast memory, PC hardware and components, is pleased to announce the global availability of its fastest ever Vengeance LPX 128GB, 64GB and 32GB DDR4 kits. Boasting frequencies of up to 3,600MHz, these new XMP 2.0 kits bring high-frequency performance to even the largest capacity DDR4 modules.

Corsair's fastest 128GB DDR4 kit ever, the Vengeance LPX 128GB (4x16GB) 3,000MHz is designed to push Intel's X99 quad-channel platform to the next level, reaching frequencies of 3,000MHz or higher. With full XMP 2.0 support and running at 1.35V with CL16-18-18-36 low latency timings, the kit offers both the massive capacity and high-frequency DDR4 performance required by top-end work stations running the most demanding applications.

Also joining the Corsair DDR4 lineup are the new Vengeance LPX 64GB (4x16GB) 3,333MHz and Vengeance LPX 32GB (4x8GB) 3,600MHz kits, the highest frequency 64GB and 32GB DDR4 kits Corsair has ever produced. Both are optimized for Intel's Z170 dual-channel platform, with the Vengeance LPX 64GB (4x16GB) 3,333MHz kit running at 1.35V with CL16-18-18-36 timings, while the Vengeance LPX 32GB (4x8GB) 3,600MHz kit runs at 1.35V with CL16-19-19-39 timings. The result is great looking, fully-matched memory offering both high-capacity and high-frequencies, and with XMP 2.0 a single BIOS setting is all that's required to unlock their full performance potential.

All three new high-speed kits are clad in Corsair's black Vengeance LPX heat spreader to improve thermal transfer, with the 64GB and 32GB kits also available with red heat spreaders. All three kits also include Corsair's Vengeance Airflow cooling system, a removable 40mm fan cooling bracket fitted to each bank of DIMMs that provides reliable airflow to ensure modules remain cool and stable regardless of load.

Be it video editing, 3D rendering, 4K gaming or content creation, these 128GB, 64GB and 32GB kits offer extensive compatibility, huge capacity and high-frequency performance to suit even the most demanding applications.

All three kits are available immediately through Corsair's worldwide network of retailers and distributors.
Add your own comment

23 Comments on Corsair Unveils its Fastest Ever 128GB, 64GB and 32GB DDR4 Kits

#1
bogami
The price for the RAM is 100% over the normal range. Expensive .I read larger sets of 64 and 128 GB are unstable over the fundamental frequency.(2133Hz) Recently they repaired the intel drivers .
For those who did know how to use the RAM BIOS settings.
Posted on Reply
#2
PP Mguire
bogami said:
The price for the RAM is 100% over the normal range. Expensive .I read larger sets of 64 and 128 GB are unstable over the fundamental frequency.(2133Hz) Recently they repaired the intel drivers .
For those who did know how to use the RAM BIOS settings.
Further, my best friend with his 5960x and Dom PLat 3200 setup is unstable as all hell by simply using XMP. What's worse is that's only 32GB.
Posted on Reply
#3
Hood
PP Mguire said:
Further, my best friend with his 5960x and Dom PLat 3200 setup is unstable as all hell by simply using XMP. What's worse is that's only 32GB.
That's one of the many reasons I'll be skipping Skylake - too many bugs. I have high hopes for Skylake-E, although...maybe that's just wishful thinking.
Posted on Reply
#4
xkm1948
I got lucky with my 32gb adata kit on my x99 platform. Although i did spend a long time to make the kit working at advertised 2800 speed.
Posted on Reply
#5
yagga
Hood said:
That's one of the many reasons I'll be skipping Skylake - too many bugs. I have high hopes for Skylake-E, although...maybe that's just wishful thinking.
I have 64GB of G.Skill 3200 @ 14-14-14-34 and it is rock solid on my 6700k @4.5 even when 70% full with 3 VMs running and 3 instances of Firefox with 5-7GB of RAM each and constant high CPU utilization. This computer is fast as hell and stable as hell. Don't believe the hype.
Posted on Reply
#6
PP Mguire
Hood said:
That's one of the many reasons I'll be skipping Skylake - too many bugs. I have high hopes for Skylake-E, although...maybe that's just wishful thinking.
5960x is Haswell-E
Posted on Reply
#7
Hood
PP Mguire said:
5960x is Haswell-E
??? Nodody is talking about Haswell-E, the discussion is about Skylake, and I mentioned that I hope maybe Skylake-E will be less buggy. I know that the current HEDT platform is based on Haswell, but why did you bring that point up? I'm talking about the future, maybe Q4 2016. ???
Posted on Reply
#8
PP Mguire
Hood said:
??? Nodody is talking about Haswell-E, the discussion is about Skylake, and I mentioned that I hope maybe Skylake-E will be less buggy. I know that the current HEDT platform is based on Haswell, but why did you bring that point up? I'm talking about the future, maybe Q4 2016. ???
Because you quoted me talking about my best friends 5960x not playing nice with 3200MHz DDR4 which I had quoted the first post in the thread.
Posted on Reply
#9
Hood
PP Mguire said:
Because you quoted me talking about my best friends 5960x not playing nice with 3200MHz DDR4 which I had quoted the first post in the thread.
Yes, sorry...Haswell-E is also buggy (so I guess all Intel's latest are pretty lame). That's why I'm skipping them all and keeping my 4790K for another year.
Posted on Reply
#10
PP Mguire
Well I see no reason for me to move on from SB-E :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#11
CorsairJake
PP Mguire said:
Further, my best friend with his 5960x and Dom PLat 3200 setup is unstable as all hell by simply using XMP. What's worse is that's only 32GB.
Could be a number of reasons for it. Dropped you a PM with my email address go ahead and have your friend get in contact with me and we will see what we can do about getting it working.
Posted on Reply
#12
R-T-B
Hood said:
Yes, sorry...Haswell-E is also buggy (so I guess all Intel's latest are pretty lame). That's why I'm skipping them all and keeping my 4790K for another year.
I've used both Haswell-E and Skylake systems (a "terrible" skylake is my primary) and neither have had many issues. Skylake is slightly more touchy on the IMC from what I can tell, and it recently had a microcode update, but other than that, nothing.

What bugs should I be expecting?
Posted on Reply
#13
Hood
R-T-B said:
I've used both Haswell-E and Skylake systems (a "terrible" skylake is my primary) and neither have had many issues. Skylake is slightly more touchy on the IMC from what I can tell, and it recently had a microcode update, but other than that, nothing.

What bugs should I be expecting?
Things like "won't boot using XMP", "blue-screens if XMP is enabled", won't boot if overclocked", won't boot unless memory is set to 2133", and many other compatibility problems have been reported by owners of various boards and RAM kits. DDR4 still has issues on both platforms.
Posted on Reply
#14
R-T-B
Hood said:
Things like "won't boot using XMP", "blue-screens if XMP is enabled", won't boot if overclocked", won't boot unless memory is set to 2133", and many other compatibility problems have been reported by owners of various boards and RAM kits. DDR4 still has issues on both platforms.
As you kind of note yourself, this is more an issue with DDR4 and XMP than Haswell-E.

But fair enough, as you are basically bound to using DDR4 on Haswell-E. (skylake you can use DDR3, but it's kinda weird and has to be low voltage I think).

Don't get me wrong though, if I had a 4790k I'd keep it too. I upgraded from a LGA1366 rig.
Posted on Reply
#15
cadaveca
My name is Dave
This is actually mostly a BIOS issue from my own testing. But then, Corsair doesn't send me samples, so I base that off of using Crucial and G.SKill sticks, where any and all issues were down to BIOS. Boards pretty clearly state what they support, and most CPUs are capable with voltage tweaks, and I'm pretty sure Corsair will stand behind their products, as seen by @CorsairJake's post above. When I did have any issues, contact the board maker or memory maker resulted in BIOS updates that fixed issues that I tested personally.

I've played with many boards, and many chips on both current DDR4 platforms. At launch for Haswell-E, things were rough, but that's not the case any more. Many Z170 boards don't support over 3600 MHz, with some only supporting 1 stick @ 3600 MHz, even. I've got kits from 2133 MHz to 3866 MHz, composed of 4 GB to 16 GB sticks, and can happily report much success using G.Skill and Crucial.
Posted on Reply
#16
PP Mguire
According to my bud it came down to being his M.2. It's a 950 pro.
Posted on Reply
#17
Hood
PP Mguire said:
According to my bud it came down to being his M.2. It's a 950 pro.
That's another thing about X99 - some people had issues booting from M.2 and PCIe cards, or sometimes BIOS wouldn't recognize the drive. All eventually solved by BIOS updates, like Dave said above about RAM issues. Seems to be taking a long time to iron out the firmware problems, which is expected for companies like ECS and Biostar or even EVGA, but not for Asus, Asrock, MSI, or Gigabyte, whose volume of sales should dictate more attention to firmware updates. (for example, my Asus Z97-Deluxe received NVMe support in Feb. 2015, 4 BIOS updates ago. So I installed an Intel 750 NVMe as boot drive with confidence that it would work, and had no problems). But I'm still not sure if a 950 Pro would've installed so easily, using an adapter card.
Posted on Reply
#18
EarthDog
PP Mguire said:
Further, my best friend with his 5960x and Dom PLat 3200 setup is unstable as all hell by simply using XMP. What's worse is that's only 32GB.
That is a Haswell-E issue. That is fast and a lot of memory for the IMC there... bet it works just fine in Z170 as its IMC is more robust. ;)

The X99 OC Formula I have works great with the 950 Pro, BTW. Hasn't been a bios update on that board in months IIRC.
Posted on Reply
#19
PP Mguire
Hood said:
That's another thing about X99 - some people had issues booting from M.2 and PCIe cards, or sometimes BIOS wouldn't recognize the drive. All eventually solved by BIOS updates, like Dave said above about RAM issues. Seems to be taking a long time to iron out the firmware problems, which is expected for companies like ECS and Biostar or even EVGA, but not for Asus, Asrock, MSI, or Gigabyte, whose volume of sales should dictate more attention to firmware updates. (for example, my Asus Z97-Deluxe received NVMe support in Feb. 2015, 4 BIOS updates ago. So I installed an Intel 750 NVMe as boot drive with confidence that it would work, and had no problems). But I'm still not sure if a 950 Pro would've installed so easily, using an adapter card.
The error codes were PCI-E based. It didn't like the fact that he had 3 Titan X's and the 950pro in there and when he first booted I told him I think it'll give him issues because it came up as gen 2. He's since sorted it without a bios update.

EarthDog said:
That is a Haswell-E issue. That is fast and a lot of memory for the IMC there... bet it works just fine in Z170 as its IMC is more robust. ;)

The X99 OC Formula I have works great with the 950 Pro, BTW. Hasn't been a bios update on that board in months IIRC.
Yea a lot of people said the same thing about fast RAM and SB-E, go IB. Same for IB and Haswell and on and on. Thing is, I've had no issues running 64GB @ 2333 (overclocked) on my SB-E and I had no issues running 32GB of 2666 on my chip either. IMO the problem is in XMP profiling because they almost never work for me. When I manually set everything like the old days it works like a charm. His issue didn't turn out to be the RAM after all, but I told him set his stuff up manually and it works fine, Prime stable.
Posted on Reply
#20
EarthDog
Makes sense because each generation's IMC was able to handle faster speeds at higher capacities. ;)

32/64GB @ 2666 is a lot different than 32GB at 3200MHz. Most IMC's just can't handle it no matter what...XMP or manual settings. If you go up in capacity, you will have to lower speeds.
Posted on Reply
#21
PP Mguire
32@2666 on SB-E though, when everybody was trying to say I'd cap around 2400 simply because it's SB-E (not to mention DDR3 vs DDR4). That was my point. I think it has more to do with "Oh the XMP isn't working, this chip must be weak" stigma rather than it actually being a problem. People are too lazy these days. In all reality my chip is a piece of shit where clocking and strength are concerned, but I can manage high RAM speeds with high capacities because I don't mind taking the time to tweak and a 5GHz clock on an H100i because I have the patience to do so. There's been too many times where a friend of mine will get new hardware and complain it won't work for this reason or that and I'll go over and figure it out because they aren't patient enough to really figure it out. Most of the time it's a RAM speed issue. They go in the bios, click that XMP and if it's blue screens they whine and say it's not compatible.
Posted on Reply
#22
EarthDog
Core overclocks and the Memory IMC are really not related... I have had dud overclockers with stud IMC's and vice versa. This is with about a dozen SB-E chips and about as many memory kits. There are exceptions of course. :)

I understand your point about XMP vs manual, and that is true, however, I manually tweak... that is where my experience comes from and just not a chip/set of ram or two. Its all over the web as well, from even more qualified people than me.
Posted on Reply
#23
PP Mguire
Don't take what I'm saying as refuting your point, because I'm not. SB to Skylake each IMC has been more robust than the last for each generation. My point is that most insinuate that older gen chips can't run higher clocks as fact, and now we see above that some are even claiming that our latest are 'buggy' and well you can read what's there. My deal is most of the hoopla over RAM speeds, IMC, and such are simply coming from inexperienced people buying the best of the best, can't get it to work, then go on the internet to complain where others spread their misinformation. We're not talking about 4000MHz DDR4 speeds, but even some speeds that have been around for a few years now.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment