Saturday, July 2nd 2016

Official Statement from AMD on the PCI-Express Overcurrent Issue

AMD sent us this statement in response to growing concern among our readers that the Radeon RX 480 graphics card violates PCI-Express power specification, by overdrawing power from its single 6-pin PCIe power connector and the PCI-Express slot. Combined, the total power budged of the card should be 150W, however, it was found to draw well over that power limit.

AMD has had out-of-spec power designs in the past with the Radeon R9 295X2, for example, but that card is targeted at buyers with reasonably good PSUs. The RX 480's target audience could face troubles powering the card. Below is AMD's statement on the matter. The company stated that it's working on a driver update that could cap the power at 150W. It will be interesting to see how that power-limit affects performance.
"As you know, we continuously tune our GPUs in order to maximize their performance within their given power envelopes and the speed of the memory interface, which in this case is an unprecedented 8 Gbps for GDDR5. Recently, we identified select scenarios where the tuning of some RX 480 boards was not optimal. Fortunately, we can adjust the GPU's tuning via software in order to resolve this issue. We are already testing a driver that implements a fix, and we will provide an update to the community on our progress on Tuesday (July 5, 2016)."
Add your own comment

358 Comments on Official Statement from AMD on the PCI-Express Overcurrent Issue

#351
john_
RejZoR
"If you trust your PSU". If PSU is so shit it can't handle more than 75W on a PCIe power connector, then you better not use it entirely because it's so shit it'll most likely blow up by itself.
There are probably more sh!ty PSUs out there than sh!ty new motherboards. I have shown a link for a 600W PSU in one of my posts, that was costing about $20-$25. PSUs based on ancient designs with many ambers at 3.3V and 5V lines. Perfect for systems that still run Athlon XPs. Believe me, plenty of people will buy the best cpu, motherboard, ram, graphics card and when they reach the final part of their system, the PSU, they will start feeling they already spend too much money on their new set up and will go for the cheaper PSU they see available.

I believe that's why AMD chose to pull more power through the PCIe bus than the 6pin. Also as I said before, the same people making motherboards, also make RX 480 graphics cards. I wouldn't believe ASUS, Gigabyte, MSI would be willing to start selling graphics cards that they can kill their own motherboards.

cadaveca
This shows that they are committed to addressing user concerns, and truly care what people think about their products. Doing this driver change costs them money.
And they are paying for it. Every time they come out and say "We hear you, we are fixing it", people add one more example of AMD messing up in their list. On the other hand Nvidia keeps it's mouth SHUT, it reacts like nothing is happening, and only talks about a problem AFTER releasing a fix. If it is something they can't fix, they just don't talk much about it. That way the problems looks like normal bugs, nothing to talk about, keeping Nvidia's reputation about excellent driver support mostly intact.

AMD is like the honest little person panicking when someone is telling him he made a mistake.
Nvidia is like the politician, never admitting there is a problem, or downplaying the significance of that problem.
Posted on Reply
#352
ikeke
john_
[..]

AMD is like the honest little person panicking when someone is telling him he made a mistake.
Nvidia is like the politician, never admitting there is a problem, or downplaying the significance of that problem.
That is the ugly truth, here.
Posted on Reply
#353
Tatty_One
Senior Moder@tor
RejZoR
"If you trust your PSU". If PSU is so shit it can't handle more than 75W on a PCIe power connector, then you better not use it entirely because it's so shit it'll most likely blow up by itself.
See the thing is, you are an enthusiast, most people out there go buy a pre-built system, they probably don't even know what PSU they have in it, OK maybe the wattage but not the quality or even the amperage and the only upgrades they are ever likely to do to that system is either throwing some extra ram in a slot or upgrading the graphics card, in some respects the 480 is exactly for them.... an affordable good performing solution.
Posted on Reply
#354
RejZoR
What's the chance of such people going for RX480 in the first place? People like this buy garbage like RX410 (I made this up), not a 200 dollar mid end card...
Posted on Reply
#355
Tatty_One
Senior Moder@tor
RejZoR
What's the chance of such people going for RX480 in the first place? People like this buy garbage like RX410 (I made this up), not a 200 dollar mid end card...
Well, when they want to play modern games on a 7 year old system with a dual core CPU some will think that is the answer and that is all my point is, there will be a market in part due to ignorance.
Posted on Reply
#356
Ungari
Steve Burke tries to burn a cheap motherboard PCIE lane using the RX 480 8GB with original driver:


Posted on Reply
#357
Tsukiyomi91
brand new cheap board should not have the burning issue, older ones like those first gen Core Series boards are more likely to get burned IMO...
Posted on Reply
#358
EarthDog
Ungari
Steve Burke tries to burn a cheap motherboard PCIE lane using the RX 480 8GB with original driver:



Jesus.. Cliff's notes please? That shit is 15m long.............

JFC, what a waste.. he doesn't even test it in the video, did you watch it yourself before you linked it????????????????????
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment