Thursday, November 3rd 2016

ADATA Launches the Ultimate SU800 M.2 2280 SATA 6Gb/s 3D NAND SSD

ADATA Technology, a leading manufacturer of highperformance DRAM modules, NAND Flash products, and mobile accessories today launched the M.2 2280 version of the Ultimate SU800 3D NAND SSD. With higher density, faster performance, and longer lifespan than 2D NAND SSDs, the new SU800 fits on a compact card while still available in 128 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB, and 1 TB and offered at very attractive price points. It supports a DRAM Buffer and SLC Caching mode to boost performance up to 560 MB/s read and 520 MB/s write, with LDPC error correction, Data Shaping, and a RAID Engine to bolster data integrity. For users that want a simple, cable-free, and low energy draw SSD upgrade, the SU800 M.2 2280 has much to offer.

The SU800 M.2 2280 fits on a compact PCB and slots directly into M.2 ports, which are increasingly common on desktop PCs and the standard on notebooks. It uses 3D NAND with an SMI controller and fits up to 1TB. Unlike 2.5" SSDs, it does not require cables and only needs very minimal power, supplied straight from the motherboard. The direct motherboard link also helps reduce latency and increase performance by roughly 10% compared to 2.5" SATA 6Gb/s drives. The SU800 M.2 2280 reaches 560 MB/s read and 520MB/s write. It also lasts longer than 2D NAND drives, with an MTBF (mean time between failures) of 2,000,000 hours versus 1,500,000.
Packed with performance-enhancing and data integrity-ensuring features
The SU800 M.2 2280 integrates a DRAM Cache for speed acceleration on demand, complemented by SLC Caching mode (single-level cell performance). For data integrity and safety, LDPC (low density parity check) error correction, RAID Engine, and Data Shaping are deployed, the latter helping even out read/write cycle loads to prolong SSD lifespan.

Extremely power efficient - and easy on batteries
Like all M.2 cards, the SU800 needs very little power to operate. It helps extend battery life on notebooks and reduces overall system power requirements for users building a desktop PC. The drive uses DEVSLP (Device Sleep) technology to go into a dormant, extra low-power state when idle to reduce energy consumption even further.

An immediately obvious upgrade
For users moving from 3.5" and 2.5" mechanical drives, the SU800 M.2 2280 offers a striking increase in performance combined with a massive reduction in drive size, noise, heat, and energy draw. Even for SATA 6Gb/s SSD users, it presents a much simpler, neater, and more reliable SSD solution that is well worth considering. Like other ADATA SSDs, the Ultimate SU800 M.2 2280 includes licenses for SSD Toolbox drive management and Migration Utility data migration apps.
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13 Comments on ADATA Launches the Ultimate SU800 M.2 2280 SATA 6Gb/s 3D NAND SSD

#1
Assimilator
An M.2 SSD that's slower than 2.5" SSDs and will probably cost more? Why?
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#2
xkm1948
Never gonna touch ADATA product again. Had enough with their DDR4 RAM.
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#3
Beastie
I utterly fail to see the point of SATA M2 drives except perhaps for laptops with no room.
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#4
ADATA-Izzy
ADATA Rep
Assimilator, post: 3548978, member: 7058"
An M.2 SSD that's slower than 2.5" SSDs and will probably cost more? Why?
They only cost marginally more than the 2.5" SU800 due to engineering costs related to the PCB. It's not slower than its 2.5", though of course we agree the ideal use for M.2 is PCIe3x4 at the moment for those that are willing to invest in it
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#5
Assimilator
ADATA-Izzy, post: 3549427, member: 165484"
They only cost marginally more than the 2.5" SU800 due to engineering costs related to the PCB. It's not slower than its 2.5", though of course we agree the ideal use for M.2 is PCIe3x4 at the moment for those that are willing to invest in it
I would hope that the same model drive would perform identically, regardless of form factor. What I don't understand is why the M.2 would be more expensive, because to my thinking the Bill of Materials should be less.
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#6
Prima.Vera
Common guys, just dump already SATA for M2 SSDs for God's sake!
This SATA interface is ancient history, and has absolutely no positive points against nVME.
Just look at those transfer rates; they are so crappy compared to nVME.
Posted on Reply
#7
Caring1
Prima.Vera, post: 3549992, member: 98685"
Common guys, just dump already SATA for M2 SSDs for God's sake!
This SATA interface is ancient history, and has absolutely no positive points against nVME.
Just look at those transfer rates; they are so crappy compared to nVME.
Not every one has a modern system capable of utilizing Nvme drives.
Posted on Reply
#8
Prima.Vera
Caring1, post: 3549998, member: 153156"
Not every one has a modern system capable of utilizing Nvme drives.
That's OK. I cannot even use an M2 without a PCI-express adaptor, but even my BIOS can be updated for nVME. ;)
Posted on Reply
#9
Assimilator
Prima.Vera, post: 3550143, member: 98685"
That's OK. I cannot even use an M2 without a PCI-express adaptor, but even my BIOS can be updated for nVME. ;)
Yeah, every system since Z68 is capable of booting NVMe natively, you just need an updated BIOS. The vendors don't seem too interested in providing updates for "legacy" products, but thankfully there are plenty of guides on how to make your own updated BIOS.
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#10
ADATA-Izzy
ADATA Rep
Assimilator, post: 3549489, member: 7058"
I would hope that the same model drive would perform identically, regardless of form factor. What I don't understand is why the M.2 would be more expensive, because to my thinking the Bill of Materials should be less.
Personally, that was my thinking too, but product managers and production managers explain that the PCB passes stricter testing and has slightly different composition (I believe more layers) due to the lack of a protective enclosure, obviously. Believe me I'm no engineer, just a lifelong PC user and corporate marketing person that likes talking :-) to me it also sounds like a small M.2 card should be cheaper, just like a passive cooled GPU is cheaper than an active cooled one etc. However, do note the price difference between the 2.5" SU800 and the M.2 2280 SU800 is pretty small.

Moving to all-PCIe NVMe 1.2 or SATA 12Gb/s or any other "faster than SATA 6Gb/s" standard would be great to do overnight, but would not work for the majority of users out there. It needs to be gradual.
Posted on Reply
#11
Prima.Vera
ADATA-Izzy, post: 3550856, member: 165484"
Moving to all-PCIe NVMe 1.2 or SATA 12Gb/s or any other "faster than SATA 6Gb/s" standard would be great to do overnight, but would not work for the majority of users out there. It needs to be gradual.
Why not making 2 variants for simmilar price? One with SATA, other with nVME. I challenge you to think which one will sell better? ;) ;)
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#12
ADATA-Izzy
ADATA Rep
Prima.Vera, post: 3550876, member: 98685"
Why not making 2 variants for simmilar price? One with SATA, other with nVME. I challenge you to think which one will sell better? ;) ;)
The SATA one will sell better :D
Besides, we have the SX8000 PCIe3x4 NVMe for folks looking at faster drives :toast:
Posted on Reply
#13
lorraine walsh
Don't quite understand why these are listed as specifically for laptops only. Do laptops and desktops use different types of M.2 slots?
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