Thursday, December 29th 2016

Das Keyboard to Demo the World's First Cloud-Connected Keyboard at CES 2017

Das Keyboard, maker of award-winning mechanical keyboards, today announced it will demo the 5Q at CES 2017. The 5Q is the world's first cloud-connected keyboard and the only keyboard of its kind that increases productivity by streaming information from the Internet directly to the keyboard. After a successful Kickstarter campaign that exceeded the company's fundraising goal by over 580%, Das Keyboard is now ready to demo the 5Q with its connected software suite called Q, allowing information like email activity, project status, stock quotes, and sports updates to be color-coded and displayed on the keyboard keys.
The 5Q software includes:
  • A dashboard for real-time keyboard key color visualization of information coming from the Internet into the 5Q. Information can be coming from IFTTT, Zapier, or any cloud applications with a public API.
  • Mode illumination, which allows the 5Q's LEDs to be individually controlled.
  • Color effects that can be applied to the entire keyboard (e.g.: wave, breathe, ripple effects, etc.)
  • Lighting profiles that can be shared with others in a community-driven marketplace.
  • A desktop REST API that allows programmers to directly control the light colors with their own scripts.
"When we launched the Das Keyboard 5Q Kickstarter campaign, we were thrilled to see how excited our community and backers were about the product," stated Daniel Guermeur, founder and CEO of Das Keyboard. "The excitement continues as we launch this ground-breaking product along with its software suite. As keyboards are traditionally used as input devices, the Das Keyboard 5Q has the capability to be an output device. It is truly innovative, and we think it will change the way keyboards are used forever."

In addition, Das Keyboard is developing a 5Q community-driven marketplace where developers can share their open source Q apps.

On the hardware side, the Das Keyboard 5Q offers ground-breaking technologies including:
  • Extra-bright RGB backlighting electronics called Das Keyboard RGB+ with custom surface-mount LEDs, optimized lens and ultra-clear light guide - making the 5Q keyboard many times brighter than any other RGB keyboard currently on the market.
  • New Gamma-Zulu mechanical switch developed by Das Keyboard and Omron (Japan), with 1.5mm actuation point and can withstand 100 million actuations - 100 percent more durable than standard mechanical switches.
  • Real-Time One (RTO) analog technology detects key presses in 0.4 milliseconds and reports it to the computer in 1 millisecond - up to 45 times faster than other keyboards.
  • Oversized Q button, also a volume knob, activates the Das Keyboard Q software

The Das Keyboard 5Q is currently available for pre-orders at $229 MSRP.

For more information, visit this page.
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20 Comments on Das Keyboard to Demo the World's First Cloud-Connected Keyboard at CES 2017

#1
Batou1986
Cloud connected keyboard ?
Yea no thanks.

After watching the entire video this has to be the dumbest thing I have seen since the heart rate tracking mouse.
Strange how they went from the company making keyboards with blank keys because no one looks at the keys to a full RGB backlit replacement for the notification light on your phone that's totally not harvesting your info for marketing purposes .
Posted on Reply
#2
RejZoR
Cloud connected peripherals are the dumbest idea ever. My Logitech G502 storing all the settings in on-board memory, the best idea ever. So I don't have to setup all the shit after every re-installation and it also has all the settings in it when I potentially carry it somewhere else. You don't have to connect every damn thing to the internet to be convenient. Doing that for keyboard is just retarded and anyone buying such device should be slapped in the face.
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#3
Arnulf
Wow, spyware-prone keyboard ... as if buggy USB interface chips in some devices weren't bad enough. Whose brilliant idea was this, the CMO's 9yo kid's?
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#5
micropage7
than using cloud, i prefer saving my setting locally
cloud = getting expensive and just for keyboard? i dont think its pretty important
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#6
erixx
Batou1986
Cloud connected keyboard ?
Yea no thanks.

After watching the entire video this has to be the dumbest thing I have seen since the heart rate tracking mouse.
Strange how they went from the company making keyboards with blank keys because no one looks at the keys to a full RGB backlit replacement for the notification light on your phone that's totally not harvesting your info for marketing purposes .
The irony is there, for sure. Maybe these cloud apps stuff is hiding the real new feature : A DAS with backlight!
(I gave my DAS to a friend because of lack of backlight, couldn't go back to none-backlight, and I wrote about it to DAS.)

Any of the gaming keyboards with programming I have had had much more features than I really used...
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#8
erixx
From their site:
Das Keyboard 5Q does not need Internet connectivity to be able to function.
Das Keyboard 5Q does not need any driver or software or cloud connection to work like a "normal" keyboard. However software is needed to configure the color and light effects of each keys.
If installed, the Das Keyboard Q desktop app is like a configuration app (like a mouse control panel) but for setting up the keyboard color profiles and accessing the REST API. The cloud connection is only to get signals from IFTTT, Zapier, etc...
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#9
wiak
bluetooth/radio keyboards is a bad idea for security, now cloud keyboards? wtf looks like privacy went out the window
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#10
blobster21
wiak
bluetooth/radio keyboards is a bad idea for security, now cloud keyboards? wtf looks like privacy went out the window
there was no privacy to start with. :slap:
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#11
erixx
A quick check here shows: Logitech Gaming software compiles data and so does Razer software if you allow it. Also Windows insiders builds do, and the list goes on. Today it's you who have to opt-out instead of optional opt-in....
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#12
ZoneDymo
I can sum up these comments quite easily.

"this is different, I dont like change, dont change things ever pls"

And Im sure in time they will get more accustomed to it, and then it wont be so scary anymore.
That is until some other innovation shows its face :O


I would also like to add that just because you dont like it or it does not seem to hold value for you personally, does not mean you should have such a strong hateful reaction to it.

I mean, using words like "retarded" in general to describe something negative is a pretty crappy thing to do, but man, we are talking about a keyboard with some extra functions here....

Would you have the same reaction if some company announced a One Direction themed keyboard that is clearly aimed at younger girls?
Or would you there be mature enough to recognize this is not meant for you so you just move on to the next article?
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#13
efikkan
DasKeyboard 3 was great; good keys and a good controller supporting NKRO with <1ms latency. But everything has gone downhill since then. There is no way that this new keyboard with cloud integration, a huge pile of software and an API is going to have such a low latency. And with all the customization being implemented in the most bloated high-level languages around, I know this is going to be a laggy and unstable experience. I seriously don't want JavaScript and Ruby to interface with my keyboard, that thing needs to be stable.
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#14
Chloe Price
RejZoR
Cloud connected peripherals are the dumbest idea ever. My Logitech G502 storing all the settings in on-board memory, the best idea ever. So I don't have to setup all the shit after every re-installation and it also has all the settings in it when I potentially carry it somewhere else. You don't have to connect every damn thing to the internet to be convenient. Doing that for keyboard is just retarded and anyone buying such device should be slapped in the face.
I hated my old Razer BlackWidow because the Synapse software was similar crap. Luckily Logitech doesn't need the same.

How drunk was that person who thought that this is a good idea? o_O
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#15
iBruce
I'll just keep using one of these with a security cable moving out from the rear. o_O


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#16
erixx
^ freak

:rockout:
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#17
natr0n
We heard you like keyboards so we built a keylogger into your keyboard so you can get keylogged while you get keylogged.
Posted on Reply
#18
Totally
ZoneDymo
I can sum up these comments quite easily.

"this is different, I dont like change, dont change things ever pls"

And Im sure in time they will get more accustomed to it, and then it wont be so scary anymore.
That is until some other innovation shows its face :O


I would also like to add that just because you dont like it or it does not seem to hold value for you personally, does not mean you should have such a strong hateful reaction to it.

I mean, using words like "retarded" in general to describe something negative is a pretty crappy thing to do, but man, we are talking about a keyboard with some extra functions here....

Would you have the same reaction if some company announced a One Direction themed keyboard that is clearly aimed at younger girls?
Or would you there be mature enough to recognize this is not meant for you so you just move on to the next article?
Actually, I'm a skeptic and currently it's looks like another gimmick that will come and go since you have to take a moment move your eyes away from the screen and look down at the keyboard reduces productivity, and since your hands will be on the kb limits keys useful for presenting information at a glance. I don't see any feature that facilitates the need to connect to a cloud-based environment. Without a constant internet connection it defaults to operation as a basic keyboard and cannot work as advertised. This isn't a new idea and has been done before with the keyboard providing. I also don't understand your last statement because why would an announcement One Direction themed keyboard clearly aimed at younger girls appear in media meant for enthusiasts and professionals? My point being is if it wasn't meant for us it we should've have seen it in the first place.
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#19
silentbogo
Totally
Actually, I'm a skeptic and currently it's looks like another gimmick that will come and go since you have to take a moment move your eyes away from the screen and look down at the keyboard reduces productivity, and since your hands will be on the kb limits keys useful for presenting information at a glance. I don't see any feature that facilitates the need to connect to a cloud-based environment. Without a constant internet connection it default to operation as a basic keyboard and cannot work as advertised. This isn't a new idea and has been done before with the keyboard providing. I also don't understand your last statement because why would an announcement One Direction themed keyboard clearly aimed at younger girls appear in media meant for enthusiasts and professionals? My point being is if it wasn't meant for us it we should've have seen it in the first place.
Absolutely agreed. As it was for the past many years - keyboard is an input device, and the monitor is an output device. I've owned my share of novelty keyboards, including once popular G15 and MX3200, and this is exactly the reason why I came back to a regular keyboard. Looking down at the LED or an LCD screen takes away more time than clicking on the notification area.
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#20
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
i miss the old days when companies would just lie to you about logging all of your input data.
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