Monday, January 16th 2017

MSI Z270 Motherboards Automate Core i7-7700K Overclock to 5.20 GHz

The "Game Boost" overclock automation feature the UEFI setup program of MSI Z270 motherboards, apparently is successful in overclocking Core i7-7700K processors to 5.20 GHz with liquid CPU cooling. Most motherboard vendors include some degree of automated overclocking with their motherboards, which let overclocking novices squeeze a little bit of extra performance out of their CPU and memory without having to tinker with settings they know nothing about. These technologies use automated trial-and-error overclocking and stability testing over multiple reboots, to achieve a somewhat high overclock setting that takes system stability and temperatures into account.

The highest automated overclock setting of MSI "Game Boost" within its UEFI setup program of the company's Z270 XPower Gaming Titanium motherboard is having success in getting the CPU to run at 5.20 GHz. The program presents the user with 11 grades of overclock. At its highest grade, the program pushes the CPU all the way to 5.20 GHz, with 52x 100 MHz multiplier/base-clock setting, a vCore voltage of 1.507V, vDIMM of 1.2V, and disabled C-states. Keeping this overclock stable, however, took AIO liquid CPU cooling.
Source: LegitReviews
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57 Comments on MSI Z270 Motherboards Automate Core i7-7700K Overclock to 5.20 GHz

#1
buggalugs
Yah but 1.5v tho, I dont think I would want long gaming sessions at 1.5v
Posted on Reply
#2
micropage7
looks nice for noob or lazy people
Posted on Reply
#3
ShurikN
5.2G at 1.5V. Can that even be considered an achievement?

Also it seems that OCing this cpu is really luck of the draw. Here's a quote form hardocp (where they previously tested 3 different 7700k)
"Bad" Kaby Lake CPUs are looking to do 4.8GHz at less than 1.3v vCore. "Good" Kaby Lake CPUs are looking to do the magical 5GHz at 1.35v or less. 5GHz looks to be where these hit the wall however. The "golden" Kaby Lake will deliver 5.1GHz, but at a high 1.37v vCore.
Posted on Reply
#4
lanlagger
over 1.5 volts?? thank you, but no, thank you
Posted on Reply
#5
dj-electric
There's no magic in automated overclocking, and that 1.5v vCore tells you how much.
Completely irrelevant for people who need a 24/7 frequency. 5Ghz at 1.35v though would be much more tangible, if the CPU could do that of course.
Posted on Reply
#6
Sempron Guy
look at little johnny proud and mighty on his 5.2ghz "overclock"
Posted on Reply
#7
KainXS
1.5v automated, more like death boost MSI(and a slow one at that).
Posted on Reply
#8
RejZoR
I've had CPU LevelUp on my ASUS Rampage II Gene like ages ago where I could basically select a different CPU model and it would overclock it automatically to that level. For example, Core i7 920 that I had could be "upgraded" up to Core i7 960 (I think). I know I could push the 2.66 GHz i7 920 up to 3.2 GHz. And the voltage wasn't even too stupendously high, making it an easy way of overclocking CPU.
Posted on Reply
#9
Prima.Vera
If you plan to keep the CPU only for less than 1 year, than 1.5V is fine.
Posted on Reply
#11
bogami
LOL 1.5. In so primed power really no problem. I use it on 1:35 On i7 3770 at 5000 Hz and have no stability problems. These can be added to a 200 Hz the temperature grew in the amount of undesirable 90..:toast:
Posted on Reply
#12
R-T-B
I personally stay away from such voltages, but I am borderline right now with my 1.45v overclock I guess. If I keep it cool longterm (it never exceeds 75C in prime95 believe it or not) it's not terribly dangerous, is it?

I only plan to keep the CPU probably for 2 years max anyways.
Posted on Reply
#13
Mech0z
A lot of people say 1.5 will kill your CPU faster, but do anyone have some evidence that it wont still last 3+ years?
Posted on Reply
#14
erixx
maybe just your PSU will explode ;)
Posted on Reply
#15
TheDeeGee
R-T-BI personally stay away from such voltages, but I am borderline right now with my 1.45v overclock I guess. If I keep it cool longterm (it never exceeds 75C in prime95 believe it or not) it's not terribly dangerous, is it?

I only plan to keep the CPU probably for 2 years max anyways.
You sure like throwing away money.

Upgrading CPU every 2 years is pointless.
Posted on Reply
#16
FYFI13
erixxmaybe just your PSU will explode ;)
Power supply is not an issue, unless you have some really poor one. CPU and/or VRM's would burn out much faster.
Posted on Reply
#17
VulkanBros
Why do they disable C-states, I thought that C-state was for idle power saving....odd people
Posted on Reply
#18
Outback Bronze
So why would MSI set such a high voltage? Maybe they know something we don't...
Posted on Reply
#19
micropage7
Outback BronzeSo why would MSI set such a high voltage? Maybe they know something we don't...
promotion?
and people will say my board is good i can push like that automatically no need more sweat
just turn it on then your pc will get faster than before :banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead::rockout:
Posted on Reply
#20
AsRock
TPU addict
VulkanBrosWhy do they disable C-states, I thought that C-state was for idle power saving....odd people
Less switching for the CPU to do ?, and after all it's about how fast not how well it idles.
Posted on Reply
#21
Dammeron
My 2600k needs vCore below 1,3V to reach 5GHz, and it is like, 6-7 years old? And in a 32nm node, compared to the 14nm of Kaby.

What a success...
Posted on Reply
#22
RejZoR
Outback BronzeSo why would MSI set such a high voltage? Maybe they know something we don't...
Aren't all modern CPU's running at higher voltages than old ones? I've seen several Skylakes running at way higher voltages than the old ones...
Posted on Reply
#23
LTUGamer
Keeping this overclock stable, however, took AIO liquid CPU cooling.
Really?

High end air cooler > AIO liquid CPU cooler
Posted on Reply
#24
CAPSLOCKSTUCK
Spaced Out Lunar Tick
5.2ghz...........................:respect:
Posted on Reply
#25
Outback Bronze
RejZoRAren't all modern CPU's running at higher voltages than old ones? I've seen several Skylakes running at way higher voltages than the old ones...
Well I thought/heard it was the other way around. Voltage should go down as the manufacturing process goes down. The lower the nm the more fragile it becomes apparently. But it seems not in this case. Surely MSI wouldn't risk this setting in the bios if they didn't think it was plausible. They are putting themselves at a hell of a lot risk and the processors along with it. Like I say, maybe they know something we don't or I don't....
Posted on Reply
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