Tuesday, April 11th 2017

Pre-orders Available for LG's 32UD99 Display: 4K, HDR10, Freesync for $999

The 32UD99 is to be LG's flagship consumer monitor, if its specs are anything to go by. And while it isn't mainly marketed towards gamers, it seems to be a good bet for image quality enthusiasts, ticking the 4K, HDR10, and Freesync (between 40 and 60 Hz via DisplayPort) boxes in a 32" panel. The LG 32UD99 carries a IPS panel with a native 3840×2160 resolution, and its 1.07 billion colors cover more than 95% of the DCI-P3 color space, and 100% of the sRGB gamut - with factory calibration to boot. The panel features 350 nits typical brightness, a neither great-nor-bad 5 ms response time, a 60 Hz refresh rate for those who don't need a million frames in a microsecond, and the 178° viewing angles that are par of the course for IPS.

The monitor's stand supports Tilt (2~15°), pivot (90°) and height (110 mm) adjustments. Input-wise, it features 1x DisplayPort 1.2, 2x HDMI 2.0a (HDCP 2.2), 1x USB Type-C (with DP 1.2 support), and a 2-port USB 3.0 hub with support for Quick Charging. There is also a pair of 5 W speakers. Availability is expected in late May. And it's a good thing this monitor is such a looker up-front, because its profile somewhat reminds me of Quasimodo.
Source: AnandTech
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41 Comments on Pre-orders Available for LG's 32UD99 Display: 4K, HDR10, Freesync for $999

#1
erixx
My Acer Predator 32" 4K with G-Sync cost me just 900 € a quarter ago... HDR10 must be the new sliced bread.
Posted on Reply
#2
swirl09
Meh, 4K/HDR/High refresh rate just months away, Ill wait :)
Posted on Reply
#3
medi01
HDR is cool, but Freesync range is ridiculous, given the price.
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#4
nemesis.ie
And for HDR to work properly we need peak brightness of 1000nits+. What's the peak on this?
Posted on Reply
#5
bug
I'm drooling all over this, but for $999 I'll have to pass.
Posted on Reply
#6
Xzibit
nemesis.ie said:
And for HDR to work properly we need peak brightness of 1000nits+. What's the peak on this?
If you read the source it will tell you

Brightness
350 cd/m² (typical)
500 cd/m² (peak)
Posted on Reply
#7
nemesis.ie
Xzibit said:
If you read the source it will tell you

Brightness
350 cd/m² (typical)
500 cd/m² (peak)
Erm, that was rhetorical! ;) i.e. "And what's the peak on this? Not even close at half that!"
Posted on Reply
#8
Xzibit
nemesis.ie said:
Erm, that was rhetorical! ;) i.e. "And what's the peak on this? Not even close at half that!"
Just like the TV & PC monitor market over the years there will be degrees of acceptance. Look at 4k TV acceptance in that market. Went from a overall 4k standard (rez/color/transmit) to just being a resolution for marketing to consumer. Same thing will happen in PC space. Much like % of RGB thats acceptable to consumers.
Posted on Reply
#9
Dethroy
Raevenlord said:
HDR10 [...] IPS panel [...] 350 nits typical brightness
AnandTech
500 cd/m² (peak)
... and no mention of contrast which will be very low due to it being IPS and its brightness anyways.

Yawn! :ohwell:
Posted on Reply
#10
bug
Dethroy said:
... and no mention of contrast which will be very low due to it being IPS and its brightness anyways.

Yawn! :ohwell:
IPS usually calibrates in the 0.12-0.14cd/sqm. Can get as low as 0.10cd/sqm. That translates into 2,500:1-2,900:1 typical static contrast (3,600:1-4,200:1 peak static contrast).
I wouldn't be surprised if this panel is the 0.10cd/sqm (or lower) variety, though.

Still, as usual, specs are one thing, but the real question is: do you have HDR content to display? I'd consider one of these for photo editing, but video HDR content is still very, very scarce. And simply forcing content into HDR space will only make your eyes bleed.
Posted on Reply
#11
xkm1948
Problem is: no good AMD freesync GPU that can power gaming at 4k
Posted on Reply
#12
pladux
Will DisplayPort 1.2 be fast enough for HDR10 at 4k@60Hz? Or do we have to waste a HDMI for that?

The UK LG website says it is "8bit + A-FRC". Is that "real" hdr10? I don't really get this hdr stuff at all.
Posted on Reply
#13
bug
pladux said:
Will DisplayPort 1.2 be fast enough for HDR10 at 4k@60Hz? Or do we have to waste a HDMI for that?

The UK LG website says it is "8bit + A-FRC". Is that "real" hdr10? I don't really get this hdr stuff at all.
If you "don't really get this hdr stuff", you're better off just ignoring it. It's gonna be full of pitfalls until everything settles down and you're only going to get burnt.
Posted on Reply
#14
nemesis.ie
xkm1948 said:
Problem is: no good AMD freesync GPU that can power gaming at 4k
But one should arrive RSN. Or get two.
Posted on Reply
#15
ZoneDymo
thats great and all but am I the only one that feels you are just buying a dinosaur if you are buying a 60hz screen now? I mean come on...at least do 100hz.
Posted on Reply
#16
Th3pwn3r
bug said:


Still, as usual, specs are one thing, but the real question is: do you have HDR content to display? I'd consider one of these for photo editing, but video HDR content is still very, very scarce. And simply forcing content into HDR space will only make your eyes bleed.
Have you ever heard of Netflix? Check them out, they have LOTS of 4K content WITH HDR!!!!
Posted on Reply
#17
bug
Th3pwn3r said:
Have you ever heard of Netflix? Check them out, they have LOTS of 4K content WITH HDR!!!!
Not everybody lives in the US. And even so, lots != good.
Posted on Reply
#18
Dethroy
bug said:
Not everybody lives in the US. And even so, lots != good. gv
What does that have to do with the US?
Netflix is basically all I watch besides the occasional UHD Blu-ray. Netflix' content quality is great imho.
Posted on Reply
#19
bug
Dethroy said:
What does that have to do with the US?
Netflix is basically all I watch besides the occasional UHD Blu-ray. Netflix' content quality is great imho.
I wouldn't know about that. Over here the first two LoTR movies are only available in stereo. And a search for "Breakfast at Tiffany's" returns stupid suggestions instead of the classic movie. Recent Avengers (et al) are unavailable. So are "Friends" or "The Big Bang Theory".
There are some good movies/tv series available, but not enough to keep me subscribed.
Posted on Reply
#20
Captain_Tom
swirl09 said:
Meh, 4K/HDR/High refresh rate just months away, Ill wait :)
Honestly I am tempted to just wait for an 8K monitor, that or I will got 120Hz 4K.
Posted on Reply
#21
medi01
nemesis.ie said:
And for HDR to work properly we need peak brightness of 1000nits+. What's the peak on this?
OFFTOPIC

Wow, never thought about that.

Samsung KS9000 can dish out 1000 nits.
LG OLED55e6d is about 600 nits.

Guess which one is hands down OMG how much better when they are next to each other... :)

"Where the 55KS9000 stumbled somewhat was during HDR playback. The high light output required by HDR led to contamination of the letterbox black bars in cinemascope 4K HDR films, owing to where the LEDs are located and how light is distributed. We’re informed that this sort of LED configuration was absolutely necessary to coax 1000 nits from an edge-lit system, so the blooming artefact was unavoidable if viewers wanted to scale the HDR heights without clipping or remapping."
Posted on Reply
#22
nemesis.ie
Probably the LG as it's OLED?

Also, were they both the same size?

I wouldn't say this is particularly off topic either.
Posted on Reply
#23
medi01
nemesis.ie said:
Probably the LG as it's OLED?
Yep.

nemesis.ie said:
Also, were they both the same size?
Yep.

Oh, it's actually 700 nits vs 1300 nits... ^^

Anyhow, you can see the blooming effect that I'm talking about here (different models but the same effect), at 1:59 :

Posted on Reply
#24
Xzibit
medi01 said:
Yep.


Yep.

Oh, it's actually 700 nits vs 1300 nits... ^^

Anyhow, you can see the blooming effect that I'm talking about here (different models but the same effect), at 1:59 :


Old LED those local dimming were horrid new ones are better at it. Your going to pay a premium for it.

The Vizio P and M series score high on local dimming LED and they don't break the bank. The more zones the better. Also Sony X900 series is above average.
Posted on Reply
#25
Dethroy
medi01 said:
OFFTOPIC

Wow, never thought about that.

Samsung KS9000 can dish out 1000 nits.
LG OLED55e6d is about 600 nits.

Guess which one is hands down OMG how much better when they are next to each other... :)

"Where the 55KS9000 stumbled somewhat was during HDR playback. The high light output required by HDR led to contamination of the letterbox black bars in cinemascope 4K HDR films, owing to where the LEDs are located and how light is distributed. We’re informed that this sort of LED configuration was absolutely necessary to coax 1000 nits from an edge-lit system, so the blooming artefact was unavoidable if viewers wanted to scale the HDR heights without clipping or remapping."
Since OLEDs have technically infinite contrast (perfect blacks) and LCDs do not and never will do, specification requirements to get ULTRA HD PREMIUM certification is different for each of 'em. OLEDs are superior in every single way (okay, except longevity - but even that shouldn't be a concern anymore), and that's why the last remaining straw left for LCDs' marketing ploy to clutch at, is boasting about LCDs' peak brightness, since for the uneducated (read as the majority of the population) higher numbers generally translate into "more awesome".

UHD Alliance
A combination of peak brightness and black level either:
• More than 1000 nits peak brightness and less than 0.05 nits black level
OR
• More than 540 nits peak brightness and less than 0.0005 nits black level
Source

Xzibit said:
Old LED those local dimming were horrid new ones are better at it. Your going to pay a premium for it.
OLEDs don't need and don't do local dimming - that's one of OLEDs' biggest advantages...

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