Monday, July 25th 2016

USB 3.0 Promoter Group Announces USB 3.2 Specification

The USB 3.0 Promoter Group today announced the pending release of the USB 3.2 specification, an incremental update that defines multi-lane operation for new USB 3.2 hosts and devices. USB Developer Days 2017 will include detailed technical training covering USB 3.2, fast charging advancements in USB Power Delivery, and other exciting topics.

While USB hosts and devices were originally designed as single-lane solutions, USB Type-C cables were designed to support multi-lane operation to ensure a path for scalable performance. New USB 3.2 hosts and devices can now be designed as multi-lane solutions, allowing for up to two lanes of 5 Gbps or two lanes of 10 Gbps operation. This enables platform developers to continue advancing USB products to fit their customers' needs by effectively doubling the performance across existing cables. For example, a USB 3.2 host connected to a USB 3.2 storage device will now be capable of realizing over 2 GB/s data transfer performance over an existing USB Type-C cable that is certified for SuperSpeed USB 10 Gbps.

"When we introduced USB Type-C to the market, we intended to assure that USB Type-C cables and connectors certified for SuperSpeed USB or SuperSpeed USB 10 Gbps would, as produced, support higher performance USB as newer generations of USB 3.0 were developed," said Brad Saunders, USB 3.0 Promoter Group Chairman. "The USB 3.2 update delivers the next level of performance."

"With increased performance and seamless compatibility, the new USB 3.2 specification brings even more speed and bandwidth benefits to new USB 3.2 devices, while remaining compatible with USB 3.0 and earlier devices," said Roanne Sones, General Manager, Strategy and Ecosystem for Windows and Devices, Microsoft. "We're excited to work with our partners in the USB 3.0 Promoter Group to help showcase these benefits to users around the world."

Key characteristics of the USB 3.2 solution include:
  • Two-lane operation using existing USB Type-C cables
  • Continued use of existing SuperSpeed USB physical layer data rates and encoding techniques
  • Minor update to hub specification to address increased performance and assure seamless transitions between single and two-lane operation
For users to obtain the full benefit of this performance increase, a new USB 3.2 host must be used with a new USB 3.2 device and the appropriate certified USB Type-C cable. This update is part of the USB performance roadmap and is specifically targeted to developers at this time. Branding and marketing guidelines will be established after the final specification is published. The USB 3.2 specification is now in a final draft review phase with a planned formal release in time for the USB Developer Days North America event in September 2017.
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7 Comments on USB 3.0 Promoter Group Announces USB 3.2 Specification

#1
Hugh Mungus
20gbps is pretty good. The next upgrade could be enough for an egpu. I believe egpu's will play an important role fir a while untill high-emd gpu's drop in price enough,or actually untill AAA games run well at lower resolutions with high settings with a budget gpu. Why? Because than you can keep upgrading the gpu untill your cpu isn't good enough anymore, so you effectively get a few extra years from your laptop, nuc or whatever needs a good gpu, but can't have the original upgraded.
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#2
TheLostSwede
Hugh Mungus said:
20gbps is pretty good. The next upgrade could be enough for an egpu. I believe egpu's will play an important role fir a while untill high-emd gpu's drop in price enough,or actually untill AAA games run well at lower resolutions with high settings with a budget gpu. Why? Because than you can keep upgrading the gpu untill your cpu isn't good enough anymore, so you effectively get a few extra years from your laptop, nuc or whatever needs a good gpu, but can't have the original upgraded.
So you want to convert PCIe signalling to USB and then back to PCIe? That makes no sense at all, this is why there's Thunderbolt and with Intel making it royalty free and "open" from next year, there's really no reason to use USB for external GPUs.
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#3
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Aren't they moving a little fast? So few computers even have 3.1 spec now they want to push even faster when USB 3.1 Gen1 can't even manage 10 Gbps. It all seems silly to me.

Yeah, yeah, march of technology and all that but at this rate, USB Group is going to create a lot of Betamaxes along the way.
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#5
OSdevr
FordGT90Concept said:
Yeah, yeah, march of technology and all that but at this rate, USB Group is going to create a lot of Betamaxes along the way.
On that note, does anyone remember FireWire (IEEE 1394)? Does Apple still use it or is it pretty much dead now?
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#6
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
OSdevr said:
On that note, does anyone remember FireWire (IEEE 1394)? Does Apple still use it or is it pretty much dead now?
Dead for years.
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