Wednesday, August 16th 2017

Alphacool Intros Eiswolf GPX-Pro ATI RX Vega and the NexXxoS GPX for RX Vega

ATI RX Vega cooler, Alphacool has the perfect cooling solutions for the start of the new AMD Vega graphics card generation. The NexXxoS GPX Vega Version now offers an improved backplate with a side shield to cover the PCB. This also improves its cooling performance, since heat is distributed more evenly over the front connection. If you use a graphics card with a NexXxoS GPX cooler and want to switch over to an AMD Vega, you'll be happy to hear about the corresponding upgrade kits for your cooler.

The Eiswolf GPX-Pro will still be an AIO solution, and will still come pre-filled with an integrated pump built around new "reverse flow" technology for whisper-quiet operation. The pure copper radiator from the well-known NexXxoS series with 120mm and a thickness of 45mm provides outstanding cooling performance.
For bigger solutions an alternative ST30 version has been created - "The Eiswolf GPX-Pro 240mm." Of course, the Eiswolf GPX-Pro will also be available in a pre-filled Eisbaer Ready version, which can be integrated into any cooling loop. You can attach it with the pre-assembled quick connectors, or use the standard G1/4" connectors at any connection point.
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16 Comments on Alphacool Intros Eiswolf GPX-Pro ATI RX Vega and the NexXxoS GPX for RX Vega

#1
ZoneDymo
I like it, very industrial understated design, but do we know anything yet about the overclocking potential of Vega? (meaning does this have much use)
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#2
RejZoR
Well, we know blower air coolers suck either way. So, this is your option of going with air cooled Vega and upgrading it to water cooled. No idea what's the cost of this so I can't say how much sense it makes...
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#3
zo0lykas
ffs, 360 logos, every where.. :/
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#4
hyp36rmax
Wow this is nice! Not a fan of AIO solutions, copper plate with integrated pump and Alphacool's radiators makes a winning combo. Big question is how much is this?!
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#5
ensabrenoir
...Eiswolf (icewolf?) just sounds cool.
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#6
thesmokingman
The acool gpu blocks make no damn sense. Who would plunk down the money for these and not have active vrm cooling? Why bother to watercool the gpu for this amount of money and go air on the vrms?
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#7
zo0lykas
why you talk if you dont know?
not nice!

thesmokingman said:
The acool gpu blocks make no damn sense. Who would plunk down the money for these and not have active vrm cooling? Why bother to watercool the gpu for this amount of money and go air on the vrms?
here is link you can look, i spend 4sec type i google and found answer :-/

https://www.alphacool.com/search?sSearch=GPX-Pro+ATI+RX+Vega
hyp36rmax said:
Wow this is nice! Not a fan of AIO solutions, copper plate with integrated pump and Alphacool's radiators makes a winning combo. Big question is how much is this?!
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#8
Hugh Mungus
Does dropping AA effect relative vega performance in all games positively, or just DiRT 4? If lower AA makes vega better relative to nvidia, vega might actually still be a good option for me and a 240mm gpu AIO is pretty awesome!!
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#9
thesmokingman
zo0lykas said:
why you talk if you dont know?
not nice!
WTF? Are you blind, can you not see it is exactly as I wrote?
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#10
Hood
thesmokingman said:
The acool gpu blocks make no damn sense. Who would plunk down the money for these and not have active vrm cooling? Why bother to watercool the gpu for this amount of money and go air on the vrms?
Agreed - this is another example of form over function. For the growing crowd who doesn't give a damn how it performs, as long as it looks "cool" and feeds their dream of being a famous "overclocker" with millions of followers on Facebook and Youtube. Or failing that, at least their friends will be impressed, if they are just as shallow and ininformed.
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#11
Kohl Baas
I'm failing to see why is this better than the factory watercooling. Same "too small" radiator as that one, but now you got 2 fans instead of 1. Why can't thex put a 240 rad on it and solve the problem? CPU-AIOs can do that...
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#12
Hugh Mungus
Kohl Baas said:
I'm failing to see why is this better than the factory watercooling. Same "too small" radiator as that one, but now you got 2 fans instead of 1. Why can't thex put a 240 rad on it and solve the problem? CPU-AIOs can do that...
AMD already has two fans on its 120mm AIO and on FE at least it performs quite well. O, and if you read the article, you would've known there is a 240mm version as well. You could even just buy the aluminium block and add Alphacool's new 420mm AIO!
Hood said:
Agreed - this is another example of form over function. For the growing crowd who doesn't give a damn how it performs, as long as it looks "cool" and feeds their dream of being a famous "overclocker" with millions of followers on Facebook and Youtube. Or failing that, at least their friends will be impressed, if they are just as shallow and ininformed.
VRM's most of the time work just fine without active cooling and Alphacool gpu blocks are always great as far as I know.
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#13
thesmokingman
Hugh Mungus said:
VRM's most of the time work just fine without active cooling and Alphacool gpu blocks are always great as far as I know.
That's not true, they run stupid hot. And even with a fullboard sink they still run hot for the effort of casting a massive hunk of alu. This is why Swiftech who originated the fullbody heatsink moved away from these designs. Look at the ACTUAL DATA.

The vrms actually run hotter with a fullbody heatsink under sustained load! Running a single bench doesn't load the sink up but run said game over 30 minutes which is typical and actually very little time for a typical game session and you will run them vrms higher than stock cooling. lmao.

http://www.swiftech.com/HD7900-HSF.aspx

**Btw, I want to point out the missing data line for furmark and using the heatsink w/o no fan at max oc/volts. Ever wonder why that data set is missing? It's pretty clear the overheating card numbers would not be a great selling point to use this thing w/o a fan for active cooling. And put into context in real cases where the heatsink will be on bottom it just exacerbates the problem two fold. No active cooling and the card gets freaking heatsoaked by this massive sink.
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#14
nemesis.ie
Just to comment on the VRM cooling, the way this is designed is that that cooling block/pump unit is actually mounted to the metal plate (full cover metal plate) so the heat from the VRMs is pulled off by the block as well as the heatsink fins. I'm sure this does put a bit more heat into the case versus a full cover water block, but it is at least actively cooling the VRMs.

If you need more dissipation, you can quick-connect more radiators too.

I'm thinking I might go with the 420 CPU block and then join the loop to one of these, that also gives one two pumps as well and an easy install - assuming a suitable case can be found that the 420 will go into. :)

The pricing is not bad at all when compared to e.g. a Kraken X62.
Posted on Reply
#15
thesmokingman
nemesis.ie said:
Just to comment on the VRM cooling, the way this is designed is that that cooling block/pump unit is actually mounted to the metal plate (full cover metal plate) so the heat from the VRMs is pulled off by the block as well as the heatsink fins. I'm sure this does put a bit more heat into the case versus a full cover water block, but it is at least actively cooling the VRMs.
That's not active cooling nor is it actually transferring any heat, its just a mount. Active cooling is typically defined as being cooled by water in the case of a waterblock. This gpu's vrms are not cooled by water nor any connection to the cold plate.
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#16
nemesis.ie
It is active in the sense that "something" is taking the heat away from the cooled area, versus passive where it's just dissipating into the surrounding area from the surface.

It (heatsink on the VRMs) is connected to the cold plate. There is a single aluminium block attached to the GPU, RAM and VRMs. The cold plate is then attached to that, so the heat in the aluminium plate (that comes from all 3 components)) is being pulled out by the water block.

This is not the same as traditional cooling where the cold plate/block is only attached to the GPU (or RAM/GPU in the case of HBM).

The other idea with this design is they can use one block for all cards, they just need a different "heat plate" for each one.

That's my understanding of the design anyway.

I suppose you could call it "Semi-active" perhaps, if you want to be pedantic. ;)
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