Tuesday, October 31st 2017

Thrustmaster's New GP XID PRO Gamepad Raises the Bar on Precision

With the brand-new GP XID PRO, PC gamers will now be able to get their hands on a totally plug-and-play gamepad that lets them start playing games right away, under optimal conditions and with absolute precision in all of their actions. Thrustmaster is the specialist looked to by simulation professionals, and the most advanced sim gamers, thanks to its decades of unmatched R&D expertise. Thrustmaster is thrilled to now be able to offer all of that know-how in this next-generation PC gamepad.

Built-in XInput standard: A powerful advantage
The GP XID PRO benefits from featuring the XInput (XID) standard built right into the gamepad, allowing it to be totally plug-and-play: just plug the gamepad in and start playing - there's nothing to install! Incorporation of the XInput standard ensures that the controller is instantly recognized as an Xbox gamepad in Windows. The main advantage of this is that all buttons and axes are assigned the proper functions and actions in games, without the need to go through a long and laborious setup phase. Even better is the fact that the GP XID PRO is the long-awaited PC-compatible gamepad that's plug-and-play in Windows 7, 8 and 10.
Exceptional precision: Thrustmaster's signature touch
The keys to cutting-edge performance, the GP XID PRO's fully-progressive mini-sticks provide high-resolution, 16-bit responsiveness - for precision two times greater than that of other gamepads on the market, according to laboratory tests carried out in first-person shooter (FPS) games (the performance curves are available at www.thrustmaster.com).

A well-proven ergonomic design
In addition to the advantages made possible by the built-in XInput standard, the GP XID PRO provides optimized ergonomics - inspired by the design of the Xbox One gamepad controller - ensuring ideal handling, with comfortable access to the mini-sticks and triggers. The GP XID PRO features 12 digital action buttons in total, all of which are perfectly positioned for easy access, plus one Windows Live button. The icing on the cake is the premium-quality braided cable, combining sturdiness, durability and flexibility.

The GP XID PRO's mini-sticks are located so as to be directly accessible by gamers' thumbs - and are rubber-textured, making them extremely comfortable to use. The GP XID PRO also features a cross-shaped D-pad for enhanced precision in all eight directions, along with two long, curved progressive triggers. The triggers allow for improved dosing and proportioning, and better control of different actions in games.

The GP XID PRO is available at a suggested retail price of €24.99 (taxes included).
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7 Comments on Thrustmaster's New GP XID PRO Gamepad Raises the Bar on Precision

#1
natr0n
The clear analog triggers make me think there is leds inside.

I might try this out.
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#2
silentbogo
Looks cheap... Even chinese XB360 gamepad clones look more solid than this.
Plus it's a wired XB gamepad clone for the price of a wireless XB gamepad clone.

BTW, all this mumbo-jumbo about progressive features is a load of crap. Dual-mode (DirectInput & XInput) third-party gamepads have been on the market for almost 10 years now. 16-bit resolution for analog sticks is a norm, not an advancement.
Almost all XInput gamepads (including no-name devices from aliexpress and gearbest) provide 16-bit resolution for thumbsticks (with degree of error for deadzones), and 8-bit resolution for analog triggers.
Basically a rehash of their old snowflake-unicorn GP XID, but now in black.
Posted on Reply
#3
natr0n
silentbogo
Looks cheap... Even chinese XB360 gamepad clones look more solid than this.
Plus it's a wired XB gamepad clone for the price of a wireless XB gamepad clone.

BTW, all this mumbo-jumbo about progressive features is a load of crap. Dual-mode (DirectInput & XInput) third-party gamepads have been on the market for almost 10 years now. 16-bit resolution for analog sticks is a norm, not an advancement.
Almost all XInput gamepads (including no-name devices from aliexpress and gearbest) provide 16-bit resolution for thumbsticks (with degree of error for deadzones), and 8-bit resolution for analog triggers.
Basically a rehash of their old snowflake-unicorn GP XID, but now in black.
Have yet to try out the GP controllers. The one issue I find is analog/thumbstick drift. It occurs on the official 360 controllers mostly and to repair them is a nightmare of soldering.
I stick to 3rd party now. Using a gamesir g3s metallic version wireless. It's perfect really.
Posted on Reply
#4
silentbogo
natr0n
Have yet to try out the GP controllers. The one issue I find is analog/thumbstick drift. It occurs on the official 360 controllers mostly and to repair them is a nightmare of soldering.
I stick to 3rd party now. Using a gamesir g3s metallic version wireless. It's perfect really.
It's like that on all controllers. My Steelseries Stratus XL has software settings for thumbstick deadzones and trigger threshold to address this issue. Originally on XB it was solved in the game engine, so in some games you'll see drift and jerky movement, while in others you won't. Though, Stratus XL is not really comfortable... especially if you have large hands. So much for XL in the name =/

But I've learned a lot about gamepads when I had to make a project for work, which needed a gamepad to control one of our motorized contraptions.
Posted on Reply
#5
silapakorn
The triggers don't look very comfortable for games that need to press and hold for a long time (e.g. racing games).

IMO the best design for triggers and bumpers are Xbox One controller gen2 and up, but the d-pad on it is horrid.
Posted on Reply
#6
GreiverBlade
nothing still beat the original Xbox 360 pad with wireless adapter

except maybe the Xbox one pad, classic, S and Elite (tho the price is a bit steep for the Elite :laugh: )

currently in process to replace my standard XBone dongle by the new one .... if it is compatible with the original pad .... otherwise, oh well XBone Elite bundle later ....


"Even better is the fact that the GP XID PRO is the long-awaited PC-compatible gamepad that's plug-and-play in Windows 7, 8 and 10."

my Xbox 360 pad and the one that replaced it were plug-and-play .... the XBone had no driver disc and worked straight after plugging, either on wireless dongle or wired and switch seamlessly between wired and dongle .... dunno why but i only noticed that lately, before i would just put the accus in charge station while i did something else or used mouse keyboard instead until my 2 AA Energizer 2000mAh would be full ... (still cheaper than the "Play and Charge" kit ... ) but right now i am using it wired with a 1,20m reversible USB/Micro braided cable ... if it wasn't grey ... i would look as if it was made for it :laugh:

"there's nothing to install! Incorporation of the XInput standard ensures that the controller is instantly recognized as an Xbox gamepad in Windows"
just like the original Xbox 360 gamepad and Xbox one (wired, tho the wireless didn't require huge steps or gimmicks to make it work either ...)


ok the price is good ... since it's 12$~ less than a XB360 pad (albeit it's a wired one )
Posted on Reply
#7
StrayKAT
silapakorn
The triggers don't look very comfortable for games that need to press and hold for a long time (e.g. racing games).

IMO the best design for triggers and bumpers are Xbox One controller gen2 and up, but the d-pad on it is horrid.
Still like the 360 the most.. but I've got Xones around too. I don't know the gen2 though (one is a Day One edition and the other a seperate controller bought soon after).
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