Thursday, January 4th 2018

Creative Unveils the Audiophile-Grade Aurvana Trio In-Ear Headphones

Creative Technology Ltd announced today the Aurvana Trio audiophile-grade in-ear headphones, the latest addition to its well-received Aurvana Series. The Aurvana Trio features a triple driver array that combines two precision balanced armature drivers with one dynamic bio-cellulose driver.
Aurvana Trio: Audiophile-Grade Hybrid Triple Driver In-Ear Headphones

The dual balanced armature module consists of a super tweeter that has been tuned to deliver detailed high-frequency playback, and a mid-range driver for natural vocals. The dynamic 10mm Bio-cellulose driver, on the other hand, is meticulously tuned to produce beautifully accurate and powerful bass. Bio-cellulose is an extremely fine natural fiber with high purity. Using cutting-edge biotechnology processes, this material is compressed to produce an ultra-thin diaphragm that is ideal for delivering sound velocity comparable to an aluminium or titanium diaphragm, while giving warm and delicate sound of paper ones.
This unique hybrid combination of dual-armature and dynamic drivers achieves an optimal size and accurate audio performance phenomenon that is not reproduced in conventional in-ears. The Trio is capable of delivering incredible clarity across a wider spectrum, regardless of trebles, vocals or bass, from 5 Hz to 40 kHz. Creative has also leveraged on its rich heritage of audio know-how in tuning these drivers to deliver a breathtakingly accurate and detailed sound stage, one that lovers of good audio will appreciate. The Trio's earbuds also feature Creative's proprietary AuraSeal design that offers effective noise isolation which blocks up to 98% of unwanted outside noise.

Design wise, the Trio is made to impress with both looks and comfort. Sporting a driver housing with a premium minimalist matte gun-metal finish, high-quality braided MMCX cables, and an angled in-ear design for that snug comfortable fit, the Trio is an ideal audio companion for discerning users who want high-quality music on the go. The Aurvana Trio is also the first in-ears in Creative's stable that supports detachable cables. This means that users can have the flexibility of customizing the quality of their audio even further by using specialized aftermarket cables.

Features:
  • Hybrid triple-driver system covering full spectrum and beyond auditory response:
  • Balanced armature super tweeter for distinct clarity and soundstage
  • Balanced armature mid-range driver for smooth and natural vocals
  • Bio-cellulose dynamic woofer for rich, deep and accurate bass
  • AuraSeal design for up to 98% noise isolation
  • Angled in-ear design for snug non-slip fit
  • 1.2 m detachable braided cable with MMCX connector for easy replacement and customization
  • 3 sizes of silicone dome tips and 1 pair of memory foam tip for the perfect fit
  • Inline mic with control button for phone calls and playback
  • Carry case to protect the earphones while on the go
  • Airplane adapter for convenient playback while travelling
Technical Specifications
  • Drivers: Dual balanced armature drivers + 10mm dynamic driver (Neodymium magnet with Bio-cellulose diaphragm)
  • Frequency response: 5 Hz - 40 kHz
  • Impedance: 16 Ohm
  • Sensitivity (1 kHz): 103 dB/mW
  • Inline Microphone: MEMS microphone
  • Frequency Response: 100 Hz - 10 kHz
  • Impedance: <200 Ohm
  • Sensitivity (1 kHz): -42dBV/Pa
  • Supports iOS/Android devices with 3.5mm headphones out, and PC/Mac with hybrid (4-pole) audio port
  • Product Weight: 19 g
Pricing and Availability
The Aurvana Trio will be available from mid-January 2018 on Creative.com at USD249.99. For in-store availability, please refer to local authorized dealers. To find out more about Creative Aurvana Trio, visit us.creative.com/p/headphones-headsets/aurvana-trio.
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4 Comments on Creative Unveils the Audiophile-Grade Aurvana Trio In-Ear Headphones

#1
RejZoR
Come on, why is everyone so obsessed with these in-ear types? I hate these. I want the standard ones that are held inside the outer part of the ear and have a cushion bud over it. Had Sennheiser. They basically have no such models anymore. Currently have AKG, checked their models the other day, they don't have such models anymore. It's really frustrating, next model that I find, I should buy 5 of them just to be sure I'll ever be able to use them in the future...
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#2
renegade_officer89
RejZoR
Come on, why is everyone so obsessed with these in-ear types? I hate these. I want the standard ones that are held inside the outer part of the ear and have a cushion bud over it. Had Sennheiser. They basically have no such models anymore. Currently have AKG, checked their models the other day, they don't have such models anymore. It's really frustrating, next model that I find, I should buy 5 of them just to be sure I'll ever be able to use them in the future...
Look for the Venture Electronics (VE) Monks or the Rose Masya. Those are buds, and both are much cheaper than this thing.
Posted on Reply
#3
zedn
RejZoR
Come on, why is everyone so obsessed with these in-ear types? I hate these. I want the standard ones that are held inside the outer part of the ear and have a cushion bud over it. Had Sennheiser. They basically have no such models anymore. Currently have AKG, checked their models the other day, they don't have such models anymore. It's really frustrating, next model that I find, I should buy 5 of them just to be sure I'll ever be able to use them in the future...
Because these earbuds need to boost their bass dramatically in order to deliver that air pressure to your eardrum, which cost clarity and sound balance by a lot. And because people have different ear shapes, the sound signature from a same pair of earbuds can vary for different people. The ceiling of design space is really low - no matter how much you refine the product, it can never reach that hi-fi category. And with the release of Bose IE2, the traditional flat-head earbuds slowly evolve into side-face earbuds over time, and this solved many problems. I mean, flat-head earbuds still exist, but the direction is not hi-fi anymore, because why bother. Earbuds now focus more on lowering the price and feeling more comfortable, and by more comfortable it really means no flat-head anymore. Creative still has Aurvana Air in production, and it's as good as it should be. Maybe you should try that.
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#4
Kohl Baas
zedn
Because these earbuds need to boost their bass dramatically in order to deliver that air pressure to your eardrum, which cost clarity and sound balance by a lot. And because people have different ear shapes, the sound signature from a same pair of earbuds can vary for different people. The ceiling of design space is really low - no matter how much you refine the product, it can never reach that hi-fi category. And with the release of Bose IE2, the traditional flat-head earbuds slowly evolve into side-face earbuds over time, and this solved many problems. I mean, flat-head earbuds still exist, but the direction is not hi-fi anymore, because why bother. Earbuds now focus more on lowering the price and feeling more comfortable, and by more comfortable it really means no flat-head anymore. Creative still has Aurvana Air in production, and it's as good as it should be. Maybe you should try that.
And because puting the thing inside the ear you just block the biggest problem of mobile audio: Noise. You can be lucky to live and work on a place where is no noise at all and use whatever you want or you can be a bit closer to reality and finding the way to actually hear your music in a city street full of traffic without smashing your hearing to oblivion while your eardrums are crying for salvation. I hear that a lot on loud, old tramways. Guy standing 5+m away and I can hear the music throught his IEM and the noise.

Don't get me wrong, even I hear the surrounding noise while using one of Ety's deep insertation IEMs I wouldn't want otherwise 'cause it's important to be aware as part o the traffic, but I'm trying to lower the noise and through that the need of high volumes to save as much of my still existing hearing as much I can.

That's the cause I still like to wear and use circumaural headphones even on street. Hard to find one with acceptable design, sound and build quality. So much depends on the shape of one's head. Somthing that looks good on someone can be ridiculous on the other. My next target is SteelSeries Siberia 840. Bit pricey, but it mixes the capabilities of a gamer headset with a bluetooth one and a decent headphone. My only problem is the color. I don't like black things in regards to summertime use. The color itself sucks up sunlight and heat making the electronics cryin' for mercy inside.
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