Monday, January 8th 2018

HyperX Unveils World's First Infrared Synchronized DDR4 RGB Memory

HyperX, the gaming division of Kingston Technology Company, Inc., today announced the industry's first memory modules featuring synchronized RGB lighting with IR (infrared) technology - the HyperX Predator DDR4 RGB. HyperX has designed IR communication channels onto each memory module, allowing multiple modules to sync LED lighting and produce an exceptional color and pattern display. Powered directly from the motherboard, this patent-pending technology provides an enhanced visual experience of RGB memory for gaming, overclocking PCs and DIY system builds. A video demo of the HyperX IR technology is here.

"As a leader in performance and overclocked memory for 15 years, HyperX is excited to bring this unique RGB memory innovation to CES 2018 and the market," said Kristy Ernt, business manager, HyperX. "Synchronizing HyperX Predator DDR4 RGB memory using IR technology creates a new way to experience RGB lighting on a PC and enables gamers and overclockers to further personalize their gaming experience."
In addition to IR synchronized RGB lighting control, the Predator DDR4 RGB modules also support multiple lighting profiles when plugged into motherboards with compatible RGB control software. HyperX is working with motherboard partners to test and qualify the HyperX Predator DDR4 RGB memory with their control software, including ASUS Aura Sync, Gigabyte RGB Fusion and MSI Mystic Light Sync. In addition, chassis vendors like In-Win are also adding features to support RGB lighting and control.

HyperX will demonstrate the new LED lighting management and expanded color and pattern display features on the Predator DDR4 RGB at CES, Jan 8-11, 2018 in Las Vegas at the Venetian Hotel, Tower Suite # 30-335.

Availability
The Predator RGB Memory is scheduled to ship in Q2.
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11 Comments on HyperX Unveils World's First Infrared Synchronized DDR4 RGB Memory

#3
acperience7
That's pretty neat since you can sync them without software, but then you still need the software to do more complex patterns. So basically if you're using this kit you probably like RGB, and have the software anyway.
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#4
CheapMeat
These looks really good actually.
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#5
Assimilator
Chaitanya said:
But why???
Because fools and their money are more easily parted the more flashy lights there are.
Posted on Reply
#6
laszlo
a must have in a windowless solid case!
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#7
Gmr_Chick
Chaitanya said:
But why???
Assimilator said:
Because fools and their money are more easily parted the more flashy lights there are.
...Don't you think it's a little harsh to call the people who like this kind of stuff "fools" just because YOU obviously don't like it? I mean, it's their money, so what do you care? :wtf:

In other words, just let people enjoy their RGB. Geez. :rolleyes:

Anyway, I'm really digging these. They look nice, clean, and bright. Unfortunately, I've already bought some RGB RAM for my build, but I'm interested to see how these look and ultimately perform once they are released. :pimp:
Posted on Reply
#8
silentbogo
Gmr_Chick said:
...Don't you think it's a little harsh to call the people who like this kind of stuff "fools" just because YOU obviously don't like it? I mean, it's their money, so what do you care? :wtf:
Even though I'm not a fan of "Stick RGB LEDs on everything" approach that manufacturers take these days, my problem with this product is not that at all.
My problem is this:
...first memory modules featuring synchronized RGB lighting with IR...
...this patent-pending technology provides an enhanced visual experience of RGB memory...
And as far as I'm concerned, this $h1t is worthless as a patent material (it's a typical application of an IR transceiver, not some semi-miraculous invention)...
...and there are cheaper and a lot more elegant ways to sync that RGB lighting, like... idunno... maybe use that clock signal from SMBus for starters (which is already connected and easily accessible on RAM module), or maybe even set up the whole RGB controller as an SMBus device, so you can program/control/sync lighting modes in software?
It's not my area of expertise, but apparently I have more productive ideas than engineers from Kingston.
Posted on Reply
#9
Assimilator
Gmr_Chick said:
...Don't you think it's a little harsh to call the people who like this kind of stuff "fools" just because YOU obviously don't like it? I mean, it's their money, so what do you care? :wtf:
I care because money spent on stupid RGB bullshit would be far better spent on making products that are actually superior to the competition in areas that actually matter when you're using your computer. Like, I dunno, performance.

But apparently "engineering" means "put RGB on it so marketing can sell more" nowadays.
Posted on Reply
#10
CheapMeat
You're acting as if these are going to be bottom of the barrel, cheapest no-name, generic quality. Just because they put effort into the aesthetics does not mean the rest is crap. Sure some gamerized products are just a facade. But it's Kingston, HyperX branded. It's not going to be absolute crap anyway. And there's PLENTY of RAM kit options out there. I doubt you're the type to even buy the best anyway (4000+MHz kits).
Posted on Reply
#11
Assimilator
CheapMeat said:
You're acting as if these are going to be bottom of the barrel, cheapest no-name, generic quality. Just because they put effort into the aesthetics does not mean the rest is crap. Sure some gamerized products are just a facade. But it's Kingston, HyperX branded. It's not going to be absolute crap anyway. And there's PLENTY of RAM kit options out there. I doubt you're the type to even buy the best anyway (4000+MHz kits).
I'd love to buy the best. But I'm not willing to pay extra for RGB crap that I'm not going to use.
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