Thursday, May 24th 2018

Philips 436M6VBPAB Monitor Gets DisplayHDR 1000 Certification

MMD, the leading technology company and brand release partner for Philips monitors, is proud to announce its recently launched Philips 436M6VBPAB was confirmed by Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) as the first display to be officially certified for the DisplayHDR 1000 specification, capable of delivering a profoundly new viewing experience, thanks to striking brightness, deeper contrast and vibrant colours. The new Philips Momentum Line has already been honored with the Computex d & I Award 2017 by IF and Red Dot guru award: Product Design 2017 for its eye-catching and innovative design. It now proudly includes among its achievements the world-renowned VESA DisplayHDR 1000 and UHDA certification, which confirm MMD's commitment to delivering innovative products capable of satisfying even the most demanding segments of the market.
The opportunity was provided by the announcement of VESA's DisplayHDR Test-Pro, a new test tool that enables users to validate display capabilities, including brightness, colour and contrast performance of laptop and desktop High Dynamic Range (HDR) displays, based on VESA's high performance compliance testing specifications. To date, nearly a dozen displays have been certified under the new spec across the three performance levels (DisplayHDR 400, 600 and 1000) and released to the market. Parameters requirements comprise three peak luminance tests, two contrast measurement tests, colour testing of the BT.709 and DCI-P3 colour gamuts, bit-depth requirement test and HDR response performance test. Only Philips 436M6VBPAB achieved maximum tier so far, by satisfying requirements of 8+2bit, BT. 709 99%, DCI-P3 90%, Brightness (Center Peak) 1000 nits, Brightness (Full Frame) 600 nits and Dark 0.05 nits.

"Achieving this standard confirms MMD's commitment to providing state-of-the-art technology for an ever-growing customer base, now reaching entertainment and console gaming users," commented Stefan Sommer, Director of Marketing & Business Management Europe at MMD. "The Momentum line-up fills the gap in the Philips monitors' product range and we're very excited to have unveiled the world's first DisplayHDR 1000 display to offer a more immersive visual experience."
The monitor designed for the gaming console is being noticed thanks to its remarkable features, such as 4K UHD resolution 3,840 x 2,160 pixels @ 60 Hz, 4 ms GtG response time with SmartResponse and Adaptive Sync technology combined to Low Input Lag ensure a smooth gameplay even in the fast-paced gameplay. Quantum Dot Technology and Ultra-Wide Color deliver 97.6% of the DCI and 103% of NTSC gamut, 103,64 PPI, C/R is equal to 4000:1 and the already mentioned brightness reach impressive 1000 nit. Ambiglow adaptive lighting, MultiView function, DTS Sound audio and the remote control makes it a perfect place for home entertainment.

Pricing will sit at an 849,- to 899,- EUR/USD level.
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22 Comments on Philips 436M6VBPAB Monitor Gets DisplayHDR 1000 Certification

#1
bug
I would pay that kind of money for a monitor like this in 32". And not made by "Philips".
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#2
RejZoR
Cool, it has AmbiGlow. I was wondering why Philips isn't using Ambilight in their monitors. Well, here it is. The price is a bit brutal though...
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#3
AnarchoPrimitiv
RejZoR, post: 3845957, member: 1515"
Cool, it has AmbiGlow. I was wondering why Philips isn't using Ambilight in their monitors. Well, here it is. The price is a bit brutal though...
That price seems more than fair for a 43" 4k monitor that meets all those standards and has a seriously wide color gamut. Especially considering 34" 3440x1440 monitors that do not come close to those specs being upwards of $1200.

bug, post: 3845943, member: 157434"
I would pay that kind of money for a monitor like this in 32". And not made by "Philips".
If it performs who cares what name is on it?
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#4
atomicus
It's just a shame AMD are so behind the curve with GPU horsepower. In all other aspects this monitor has a lot going for it... but if you're a serious gamer and want to get the most out of it, you won't want to be pairing it with anything AMD has to offer. If only Nvidia binned G-Sync and embraced Adaptive.
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#6
bug
AnarchoPrimitiv, post: 3845968, member: 168101"
That price seems more than fair for a 43" 4k monitor that meets all those standards and has a seriously wide color gamut. Especially considering 34" 3440x1440 monitors that do not come close to those specs being upwards of $1200.



If it performs who cares what name is on it?
If it performs. I expect all sorts of backlight bleeding and QC issues from these guys.
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#7
Valantar
Wait, so this is a 43" FreeSync-activated HDR-1000 certified "monitor" with 90% DCI-P3 coverage and 4K resolution? Wow. This is a real candidate for replacing my TV, even if it's rather small (my current TV is 40"). A 55-65" version would be perfect (and would be even more perfect if it had one of those "can run at 100Hz at 1080p" features). As long as it has a remote and a few HDMI inputs, that is. And an optical output for audio.
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#8
Vayra86
AnarchoPrimitiv, post: 3845968, member: 168101"
That price seems more than fair for a 43" 4k monitor that meets all those standards and has a seriously wide color gamut. Especially considering 34" 3440x1440 monitors that do not come close to those specs being upwards of $1200.



If it performs who cares what name is on it?
TP Vision isn't really known for quality product. They have a few. The rest is garbage.

Suffice to say, this isn't Philips you're buying and has nothing to do with the quality that once represented. Once... when this company was actually based in, and manufacturing in Holland ;) Then again their TVs were never great apart from Ambilight which is a pretty neat feature.
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#9
Valantar
Vayra86, post: 3846156, member: 152404"
TP Vision isn't really known for quality product. They have a few. The rest is garbage.
In what ways? QC? Long-term reliability? Panel quality or uniformity? Design? Image artifacting or other IQ issues? Considering most controllers seem to be more or less off-the-shelf-solutions, they'd have to mess up badly for the latter. Design can be ignored. The first three, though, are important.
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#10
Vayra86
Valantar, post: 3846157, member: 171585"
In what ways? QC? Long-term reliability? Panel quality or uniformity? Design? Image artifacting or other IQ issues? Considering most controllers seem to be more or less off-the-shelf-solutions, they'd have to mess up badly for the latter. Design can be ignored. The first three, though, are important.
Correct, the first three. This is a company that focuses on the bottom half of the market and it needed Philips to 'cover' the top half. Taking over a brand name does not quality make.
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#11
Valantar
Vayra86, post: 3846163, member: 152404"
Correct, the first three. This is a company that focuses on the bottom half of the market and it needed Philips to 'cover' the top half. Taking over a brand name does not quality make.
That's a bummer. Hope they don't cherry-pick samples for review so we can see some reasonably representative reviews - 'cause on paper, this is mighty interesting.
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#12
bug
Valantar, post: 3846259, member: 171585"
That's a bummer. Hope they don't cherry-pick samples for review so we can see some reasonably representative reviews - 'cause on paper, this is mighty interesting.
Well, reviews don't cover QC or long term reliability anyway. And when it comes to backlight bleed, there's always the "ymmv" phrase included.
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#13
Valantar
bug, post: 3846262, member: 157434"
Well, reviews don't cover QC or long term reliability anyway. And when it comes to backlight bleed, there's always the "ymmv" phrase included.
That's true. Backlight bleed depends quite a bit on the design of the diffuser layer behind the panel (and its mounting) though. Then again, with HDR1000, I'd kind of expect this to have local dimming, which should theoretically diminish that problem. But still, YMMV, as with pretty much anything that isn't EIZO or NEC.
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#14
mac007
what panel are they using TN, IPS or VA??
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#15
Valantar
mac007, post: 3846364, member: 162807"
what panel are they using TN, IPS or VA??
Given contrast and color gamut it's definitely not TN. I'd guess VA. Never heard of a 4000:1 IPS panel.
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#16
atomicus
Valantar, post: 3846277, member: 171585"
That's true. Backlight bleed depends quite a bit on the design of the diffuser layer behind the panel (and its mounting) though. Then again, with HDR1000, I'd kind of expect this to have local dimming, which should theoretically diminish that problem. But still, YMMV, as with pretty much anything that isn't EIZO or NEC.
Yeah you'd expect and hope it had local dimming but it doesn't unfortunately. It's edge lit, so that is FAR from ideal. Not necessarily a deal breaker, but I guess they wanted to keep costs down.
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#17
bug
atomicus, post: 3846506, member: 155807"
Yeah you'd expect and hope it had local dimming but it doesn't unfortunately. It's edge lit, so that is FAR from ideal. Not necessarily a deal breaker, but I guess they wanted to keep costs down.
Weird, as even HDR600 requires local dimming. HDR400 only needs global dimming.
As expected, Philips=crap.
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#18
Valantar
atomicus, post: 3846506, member: 155807"
Yeah you'd expect and hope it had local dimming but it doesn't unfortunately. It's edge lit, so that is FAR from ideal. Not necessarily a deal breaker, but I guess they wanted to keep costs down.
Hm. That has to be one heck of a panel (and backlight!) to reach 1000 nits peak and maintain a 4000:1 static contrast ratio. I wouldn't be surprised to see that drop a bit at peak brightness, but anything below 3000:1 would be problematic in terms of actually being HDR. Then again, it passed certification... Strange. Reviews (with proper testing) will definitely be interesting. And if they're reaching that brightness and maintaining contrast across the image, I'd be very interested to see what kind of light-guiding magic they've infused into that diffuser layer. Hope there's some sort of heatsink attached to those edge LED arrays too. If not, sustaining 600 nits would most likely cook them in relatively short order.
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#19
bug
Valantar, post: 3846509, member: 171585"
Hm. That has to be one heck of a panel (and backlight!) to reach 1000 nits peak and maintain a 4000:1 static contrast ratio. I wouldn't be surprised to see that drop a bit at peak brightness, but anything below 3000:1 would be problematic in terms of actually being HDR. Then again, it passed certification... Strange. Reviews (with proper testing) will definitely be interesting. And if they're reaching that brightness and maintaining contrast across the image, I'd be very interested to see what kind of light-guiding magic they've infused into that diffuser layer. Hope there's some sort of heatsink attached to those edge LED arrays too. If not, sustaining 600 nits would most likely cook them in relatively short order.
My gut feeling tells me these HDR400/600/1000 certifications are being handed out like cookies. Probably to create the impression there's HDR capable equipment out there and entice producers of HDR content.
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#20
Valantar
bug, post: 3846523, member: 157434"
My gut feeling tells me these HDR400/600/1000 certifications are being handed out like cookies. Probably to create the impression there's HDR capable equipment out there and entice producers of HDR content.
You might be onto something. I likely won't be spending the money for a new monitor until my trusty U2711 gives up the ghost (which, considering it's CCFL backlit, shouldn't be that long considering I got it in 2011), but I definitely want (real, actual) HDR to be a widespread option by that point. Monitors are >5 year investments, so seeing tech on the way but not quite arrived when I'm buying is mighty annoying. If what it takes to get HDR (and the wider color gamut and more intelligent treatment of display data that comes with it) a real foothold in the PC space is dubious certifications for a while, that's fine by me.
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#21
bug
Valantar, post: 3846745, member: 171585"
You might be onto something. I likely won't be spending the money for a new monitor until my trusty U2711 gives up the ghost (which, considering it's CCFL backlit, shouldn't be that long considering I got it in 2011), but I definitely want (real, actual) HDR to be a widespread option by that point. Monitors are >5 year investments, so seeing tech on the way but not quite arrived when I'm buying is mighty annoying. If what it takes to get HDR (and the wider color gamut and more intelligent treatment of display data that comes with it) a real foothold in the PC space is dubious certifications for a while, that's fine by me.
Sorry to burst your bubble, my rather cheap LG from 2009-2010 or so is still as fine as it was on day 1. :D
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#22
Valantar
bug, post: 3846756, member: 157434"
Sorry to burst your bubble, my rather cheap LG from 2009-2010 or so is still as fine as it was on day 1. :D
You're probably right. I suppose the longevity issues with CCFLs were mainly on laptops - there's a rather shocking amount of old 17"-19" 5:4 Dell monitors at my university :p
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