Wednesday, June 6th 2018

G.SKILL Showcases Extreme DDR4 Memory Kits up to DDR4-5066MHz at Computex 2018

(Editor's Note: We took some risks in getting these pictures for you guys at COMPUTEX, hitting the show floor as we did, so enjoy them. G.SKILL took the opportunity to showcase a series of ultra-high speed DDR4 kits on various platforms at Computex 2018. Their 5066 MHz, dual-channel kit really is the highest-performing memory on display, but there are some notorious trade-offs, as there would obviously need to be - namely, when it comes to timings. That said, it remains a very impressive showing that helps cement G.Skill's status as one of the best memory companies currently in business.)

DDR4-5066MHz 2x8GB -The Highest Frequency in Dual Channel Memory Configuration
Chasing after the fastest possible memory speed, G.SKILL once again breaks the limits and presents the Trident Z RGB DDR4-5066MHz extreme dual-channel kit built with Samsung 8Gb ICs, which is the highest frequency dual-channel memory on live demo display at Computex 2018. This extremely high memory speed live demo system is built with the latest Intel Core i7-8700K processor and MSI Z370I Gaming PRO CARBON AC motherboard.
DDR4-4800MHz CL17 2x8GB - The Ultimate Combination of Frequency & Timing
Another ground breaking demo memory kit at the G.SKILL booth is the DDR4-4800MHz CL17-17-17-37 2x8GB Trident Z RGB memory kit that's based on Samsung B-die, which showcases the lowest possible CAS latency timing at such high frequency. This extreme memory kit is demoed with the Intel Core i7-8700K processor and ASUS ROG MAXIMUS X APEX motherboard.
DDR4-4600MHz 4x8GB - The Fastest 32GB Memory Kit
In addition to the high-speed 16GB (2x8GB) kits, G.SKILL also is showing the fastest 32GB (4x8GB) memory kit ever seen at DDR4-4600MHz, while maintaining a low CAS latency at CL18-18-18-38. This extreme performance kit is also built with Samsung 8Gb ICs, and is shown alongside the Intel Core i5-8600K processor and ASUS ROG MAXIMUS X HERO motherboard.
Fastest SO-DIMM Kit at DDR4-4200MHz 4x8GB
Ever wonder how fast a compact SO-DIMM DDR4 memory can be? This year at Computex, G.SKILL is displaying the fastest running quad-channel Ripjaws SO-DIMM memory kit at DDR4-4200MHz 4x8GB, constructed with the high performance Samsung 8Gb ICs, featured in a mini-ITX build with the Intel Core i9-7940X processor and ASRock X299-ITX/ac motherboard.

DDR4-3600MHz SO-DIMM on Intel NUC
Another high speed SO-DIMM memory kit is the DDR4-3600MHz 2x8GB kit displayed on an Intel NUC system, which is modded with custom water cooling. It shows the potential of high memory overclocking performance even on a small form factor system.
DDR4-4000MHz 2x8GB on AMD Ryzen
The AMD Ryzen 2000 series processors with the X470 platform offer greater memory overclocking performance than its previous generation. G.SKILL successfully reached DDR4-4000MHz 2x8GB memory speed on the AMD system, built with AMD Ryzen 7 2700X processor and ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VII Hero motherboard.
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27 Comments on G.SKILL Showcases Extreme DDR4 Memory Kits up to DDR4-5066MHz at Computex 2018

#1
Tomorrow
Hey G.Skill: How about you release the 4700Mhz CL19 kit you showed back in February?
It was promised for Q2 which ends at the end of this month. Judging by the previous delays between announcement and availability i don't expect any of the kits showed here to be availabe before Q4 2018. Maybe even Q1 2019.

G.Skill is indeed the top player in high performance memory (i would argue to only one) but they really need to stop doing these paper launches. By the time their memory kits become available i have already forgotten that they even announced something. 4-6 months is a long time in tech industry. Or maybe do a press release when these do become available so as to remind people again.

Speaking of the products themselves that 5066Mhz kit is just bonkers. Tho only the single MSI board with a binned 8700K or 8086K can problably run this at the rated speed. No mention of voltages? I'm assuming 1.50V

The 4800Mhz CL17 is nice. Combining relatively low timings for the speed is awesome. I will remind people that CL17 is generally used for 3466Mhz or 3600MHz kits.

32GB kit at 4600Mhz is also very much appreciated by some. CL18 is also ok for that speed and capacity.

The Ryzen kit is the most intresting of the bunch. I wonder what tweaks G.Skill made to make it possible. Well the timings are not that great so there's that but i wonder if this also requires a binned 2700X or can 4000Mhz CL18 be achieved with off the shelf 2700X and C7H. I doubt it but it would be nice for those seeking ultimate Infinity Fabric speed.
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#2
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
How about working on timings.
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#3
Raevenlord
News Editor
eidairaman1, post: 3852206, member: 40556"
How about working on timings.
I agree, their timing with this showcase was a bit off...
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#4
Sabishii Hito
eidairaman1, post: 3852206, member: 40556"
How about working on timings.
You want lower latencies at these speeds, you gotta raise the volts to ridiculous levels and use extreme cooling.
Posted on Reply
#5
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Sabishii Hito, post: 3852272, member: 85720"
You want lower latencies at these speeds, you gotta raise the volts to ridiculous levels and use extreme cooling.
Whats considered ridiculous volts
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#7
phill
I like G Skill ram, probably my go to ram for now, above anything else.. Might need some more if prices come down for my X99 rig I think :)
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#8
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Sabishii Hito, post: 3852288, member: 85720"
Probably in excess of 2.2v.
2.2?

My ran being 2400 atm runs 1.65V, tightest timings i can get across the board too are 10s and 20s.
Posted on Reply
#9
phill
eidairaman1, post: 3852319, member: 40556"
2.2?

My ran being 2400 atm runs 1.65V, tightest timings i can get across the board too are 10s and 20s.
I'm guessing you use DDR3 at the moment?
If I recall correctly, I was using 2.0v+ when doing some ram intensive testing with certain sticks of DDR3 and with DDR4, I think anything up to 1.6v or more.. It's been a long time since I was pushing things that hard tho.. Now everything is about 24/7, not so much top end speed for me...
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#10
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
phill, post: 3852325, member: 96013"
I'm guessing you use DDR3 at the moment?
If I recall correctly, I was using 2.0v+ when doing some ram intensive testing with certain sticks of DDR3 and with DDR4, I think anything up to 1.6v or more.. It's been a long time since I was pushing things that hard tho.. Now everything is about 24/7, not so much top end speed for me...
Yup ddr3, my ram is 2133 but i learned it can run 2400 (limit on board unless if fsb is increased)
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#11
phill
With some ram kits I've had in the past with DDR3 we where able to get close to 2600 or 2800Mhz depending on the ram speed and timings :) Some tests preferred the Mhz and others preferred the timings being tight :) And then you had different types of ram which that made better or worse for.. No wonder overclocking costs so damn much!! :( :)
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#12
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
phill, post: 3852338, member: 96013"
With some ram kits I've had in the past with DDR3 we where able to get close to 2600 or 2800Mhz depending on the ram speed and timings :) Some tests preferred the Mhz and others preferred the timings being tight :) And then you had different types of ram which that made better or worse for.. No wonder overclocking costs so damn much!! :(:)
My board allows the 2400 option off the back, id have to use the fsb at that point as my cpu is multiplier clocked only
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#13
phill
eidairaman1, post: 3852348, member: 40556"
My board allows the 2400 option off the back, id have to use the fsb at that point as my cpu is multiplier clocked only
I think I was overclocking with either Z77 or Z97, which allowed the higher ram dividers.. Just a bit of voltage and away you go :) Be interesting if these new G Skill kits could actually go a bit tighter with a bit more voltage or not.. But then I wonder the difference in gaming with 3200 to 5000?? And the cost difference too....
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#14
Knoxx29
The Power Of Intel
phill, post: 3852307, member: 96013"
I like G Skill ram, probably my go to ram for now, above anything else..
You are thinking about that now, lmao, i have forgotten for how many years i have been using G Skill.:p
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#15
cadaveca
My name is Dave
eidairaman1, post: 3852277, member: 40556"
Whats considered ridiculous volts
Anything over 1.9V. Early DDR4 spec says that DDR4 must not die @ 1.9V; they don't have to be stable, but they do have to be able to manage such volts. This is because of DDR3/DDR4 one the same platform was possible, and DDR3 @ 1.9V isn't exactly that much. XMP for early DDR3 was 1.8V.

you guys complaining about timings clearly don't know much about DDR4. Those timings are pretty low, if you ask me.
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#16
emissary42
I'll take a pair of these DDR4-4800MHz CL17-17-17-37 Trident Z :D
Posted on Reply
#17
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
cadaveca, post: 3852402, member: 25138"
Anything over 1.9V. Early DDR4 spec says that DDR4 must not die @ 1.9V; they don't have to be stable, but they do have to be able to manage such volts. This is because of DDR3/DDR4 one the same platform was possible, and DDR3 @ 1.9V isn't exactly that much. XMP for early DDR3 was 1.8V.

you guys complaining about timings clearly don't know much about DDR4. Those timings are pretty low, if you ask me.
Care to inform the crowd?
Posted on Reply
#18
cadaveca
My name is Dave
eidairaman1, post: 3852429, member: 40556"
Care to inform the crowd?
Of what? Simple math? :shadedshu: How to correctly calculate latency isn't hard nor a mystery.

4800 C17, 4600 C18, both excellent.

3600 C18 is a bit high, but still better than 3200 C16, 3600 C19 (19-19-19) gives almost the same performance as 3200 16-18-18. I'll have a review that shows this soon.

4000 C18 is fine too.

So where is the problem? I mean, I play with memory like every day right now, got about a TB of DDR4 sitting here, blah blah blah...

Meanwhile I see the usual bunch of haters complaining about something that doesn't justify a complaint. It's ridiculous. This is why I have no powers on the forum, because people that comment like that I'd be blasting off the site in a heartbeat. We are here for enthusiasts, not bitchy whiners that make a mountain out of a molehill. It's so close to FUD that it's worth a banning.
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#20
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
cadaveca, post: 3852435, member: 25138"
Of what? Simple math? :shadedshu: How to correctly calculate latency isn't hard nor a mystery.

4800 C17, 4600 C18, both excellent.

3600 C18 is a bit high, but still better than 3200 C16, 3600 C19 (19-19-19) gives almost the same performance as 3200 16-18-18. I'll have a review that shows this soon.

4000 C18 is fine too.

So where is the problem? I mean, I play with memory like every day right now, got about a TB of DDR4 sitting here, blah blah blah...

Meanwhile I see the usual bunch of haters complaining about something that doesn't justify a complaint. It's ridiculous. This is why I have no powers on the forum, because people that comment like that I'd be blasting off the site in a heartbeat. We are here for enthusiasts, not bitchy whiners that make a mountain out of a molehill. It's so close to FUD that it's worth a banning.
So why not write an article on bandwidth and latency correlation and differences amongst generations of ddr?
Posted on Reply
#23
Tomorrow
Blueberries, post: 3852442, member: 167159"
Let me guess... MSRP: $500 2x8GB.
Wich one?

If it's the 4000Mhz Ryzen one then that would be too much. If it's the 5066Mhz one then that's about right. The highest speed available currently is 4600Mhz (and that's only CL19 by the way). That costs about 400 so it's reasonable to expect the 5066Mhz one to cost around 500.

Memory speed isn't nesseseraly expensive. It's the combination of speed and capacity or just pure capacity. ~500 for the fastest memory kit in the world in terms of Mhz - well expect to pay way-way more the fastest CPU's or GPU's. 500 compared to that is a bargain.
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#24
londiste
I feel like nit-picking.
5066 MHz? Not really, no. The correct term is 5066 MT/s (up to 40 528 MB/s).
2533 Mhz is the I/O bus speed. 633 Mhz is the clock speed this memory actually runs on
:)
Posted on Reply
#25
Tomorrow
londiste, post: 3852481, member: 169790"
I feel like nit-picking.
5066 MHz? Not really, no. The correct term is 5066 MT/s (up to 40 528 MB/s).
2533 Mhz is the I/O bus speed. 633 Mhz is the clock speed this memory actually runs on
:)
Well you always feel like nitpicking so let's address that:

40528 MB/s . That is what? Read? Write? Copy?

In dual channel configuration 3200Mhz CL16 already achieves excess of 48000MB/s on AM4. Assuming linear scaling that would put 5066 kit at around 76000MB/s. Already nearly double the number you quoted. Also what MB/s anyone achieves is platform (meaning CPU+MB) dependant (to a degree).
You are correct about the I/O and SDR clocks but you forget that most programs/games take advantage of the quad data rate of DDR4.

So all in all i see no problem calling these 5066Mhz. No need to confuse people further by breaking things down to base clocks. In the end what matters is the effective clock.
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