Tuesday, June 12th 2018

Intel Starts Testing Smallest 'Spin Qubit' Chip for Quantum Computing

Intel researchers are taking new steps toward quantum computers by testing a tiny new "spin qubit" chip. The new chip was created in Intel's D1D Fab in Oregon using the same silicon manufacturing techniques that the company has perfected for creating billions of traditional computer chips. Smaller than a pencil's eraser, it is the tiniest quantum computing chip Intel has made.

The new spin qubit chip runs at the extremely low temperatures required for quantum computing: roughly 460 degrees below zero Fahrenheit - 250 times colder than space. The spin qubit chip does not contain transistors - the on/off switches that form the basis of today's computing devices - but qubits (short for "quantum bits") that can hold a single electron. The behavior of that single electron, which can be in multiple spin states simultaneously, offers vastly greater computing power than today's transistors, and is the basis of quantum computing.
The zigzag lines in the photo are printed wires connecting the chip's qubits to the outside world.

One feature of Intel's tiny new spin qubit chip is especially promising. Its qubits are extraordinarily small - about 50 nanometers across and visible only under an electron microscope. About 1,500 qubits could fit across the diameter of a single human hair.

This means the design for new Intel spin qubit chip could be dramatically scaled up. Future quantum computers will contain thousands or even millions of qubits - and will be vastly more powerful than today's fastest supercomputers.
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24 Comments on Intel Starts Testing Smallest 'Spin Qubit' Chip for Quantum Computing

#1
Prima.Vera
This is the begining of true A.I. However, hardware without proper Software it's not possible....
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#2
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
calling @qubit lol
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#3
lynx29
Prima.Vera said:
This is the begining of true A.I. However, hardware without proper Software it's not possible....
yeah, I know Microsoft has its quantum programming lessons out for people to try, but its still based in old world thinking programming styles... a new language from the ground up is going to be needed for quantum to truly shine imo, but I think such a task is too hard for any human, no one seems to be tackling software side of it yet in an original way.
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#5
happita
Skynet here we come :roll:
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#6
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
happita said:
Skynet here we come :roll:
Use of AI/Machine Learning yup, Skynet/Matrix.
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#7
Prima.Vera
So, how many qubits is 1 qubyte??
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#8
okiheh
The new spin qubit chip runs at the extremely low temperatures required for quantum computing: roughly 460 degrees below zero Fahrenheit - 250 times colder than space.
Qubit -460 Fahrenheit / Space -455 Fahrenheit hmm?
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#9
Hood
I read a book about quantum computing maybe 20 years ago, when it was all theoretical and no qubits existed yet. Sounds like some dry reading, but it was actually very interesting. It will change everything.
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#10
Vya Domus
roughly 460 degrees below zero Fahrenheit - 250 times colder than space
-460 Farenheit = -273.333 Celsius

Space or rather something like CMB ~ -270.556 Celsius

I'm not sure the math is right.
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#11
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Vya Domus said:
-460 Farenheit = -273.333 Celsius

Space or rather something like CMB ~ -270.556 Celsius

I'm not sure the math is right.
Lets throw Kelvin in the mix
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#12
GoldenX
How can you archive < 0 Kelvins? Intel, if you want to destroy the laws of physics, go make an anime.
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#13
Vinska
Okay, if using silly units, absolute zero is −459.67°F, while this article claims -460°F. Nope, that doesn't work, no.
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#14
Komshija
We'll also need a portable chip neutralizer that could make all chips or electronics in certain range useless regardless of their protections. Such ultra small ships will go even smaller and that will be a huge problem considering individual privacy. The problem is that such technology first goes to very bad folks (CIA, NSA, DoD) and not to research centers where they could use them to make something useful like developing cure for various diseases, improving quality of life etc.
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#15
Octopuss
There are quantum computers already then? I don't understand any of it, and when I tried reading about it on Wiki some years ago, my head overheated and I gave up.
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#16
hat
Enthusiast
I don't claim to understand any of it, but quantum computers do exist today. How they're used, and to what extent, I have no idea. I don't even know what the performance is like or what they could be used for. It seems very much like it's still in early experimental phases to me. The chip has to be colder than outer space to work? Seems extremely difficult to pull off.
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#17
Caring1
Reading this it's almost like Intel is claiming to have made the first working Qubits and are patting themselves on the back, no admission they took something that already has been made and proven to work and changed it up a bit.
There's definitely a lot of "spin" in this.
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#18
RejZoR
So, when are we getting smartphones with these?
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#19
PowerPC
I yet have to see something quantum computers can do better than regular computers. I think once they come up with an actually useful application for these, the hardware will "miraculously" follow and you won't even have to cool it to below 0 Kelvin really quickly. We aren't seeing these in smartphones because they can't do anything yet. It may all just be hype and a bubble in the end, who knows?
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#20
Hood
[QUOTE="PowerPC, post: 3855451, member: 159951"I yet have to see something quantum computers can do better than regular computers./QUOTE]

Some tasks, like integer factoring, DNA analysis, cryptography, and modeling complicated chemical reactions require an enormous amount of operations to be completed. These are the kind of tasks that could take billions of years to complete even on the best computers. The difference is so important that, with enough qubits, billion-year operations on classical computers can take days or hours on quantum devices. This article explains why - https://medium.com/quantum1net/classical-computing-vs-quantum-computing-the-quantum-cracking-fest-begins-6219f899de3f[
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#21
close
Details surface about the pencil Intel used for the photo shoot / demo:

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#22
Tardian
Possible uses: The meaning of life? Tomorrow's Lotto numbers. Designing VR small fast diffraction limited wide range zoom lenses. 8k movies all CGI ...
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#23
Prima.Vera
Caring1 said:
Reading this it's almost like Intel is claiming to have made the first working Qubits and are patting themselves on the back, no admission they took something that already has been made and proven to work and changed it up a bit.
There's definitely a lot of "spin" in this.
Nah, they just claim in the first true processor with quibits on that size. There are already quantum computers, but the size of them is more than 1 rack space.
Still the quibits are in an infant state and the computers require huge amount of liquid H2 or N2 to work. We are in the "first generation CRT TVs now"... :D
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#24
PowerPC
Hood said:

Some tasks, like integer factoring, DNA analysis, cryptography, and modeling complicated chemical reactions require an enormous amount of operations to be completed. These are the kind of tasks that could take billions of years to complete even on the best computers. The difference is so important that, with enough qubits, billion-year operations on classical computers can take days or hours on quantum devices. This article explains why - https://medium.com/quantum1net/classical-computing-vs-quantum-computing-the-quantum-cracking-fest-begins-6219f899de3f[
A medium article won't convince me that this isn't pure hype right now lol. All of these things haven't been done yet. There aren't even algorithms devised for these yet. That's what I'm saying: Just because it's possible, doesn't mean it's feasible. Just because it's possible to visit neighboring galaxies with the speed of light, it doesn't mean it's going to happen once we have those engines..
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