Tuesday, June 27th 2017

AMD Comments on FreeSync 2 HDR Controversy

AMD earlier this month announced that it is simply renaming its new FreeSync 2 standard as FreeSync 2 HDR, since it already incorporates hardware HDR, even though HDR is but one among many new features introduced with FreeSync 2. This caused some controversy as some FreeSync 2-certified monitors, which could now be plastered with FreeSync 2 HDR stickers, barely meet VESA's DisplayHDR 400 standards. AMD released a detailed statement to TechPowerUp, in which it clarified that FreeSync 2 HDR in no way lowers the bar for HDR, and that its certification program is both separate from and predates VESA DisplayHDR standards.

Essentially, AMD claims that all FreeSync 2 HDR-certified displays exceed DisplayHDR 400 requirements, but not all meet the DisplayHDR 600 minimums. In such cases, monitor manufacturers may stick both DisplayHDR 400 and AMD FreeSync 2 HDR logos in their specs-sheets or the product itself, but that doesn't mean that their monitors can only put out 400 nits brightness. The statement follows.
The FreeSync 2 (now FreeSync 2 HDR) specifications were set almost a year before the VESA DisplayHDR standards were published. These two programs are separate and independent from each other.

When DisplayHDR 400 was defined, it was clear from the start that the FreeSync 2 requirements for color gamut, max brightness and contrast ratio set a higher bar than DisplayHDR 400. AMD is not lowering the bar for FreeSync 2 HDR to align with DisplayHDR 400. We're clarifying that a display that meets the requirements for DisplayHDR 600, or higher, could meet the color gamut, max brightness and contrast ratio requirements of FreeSync 2 HDR. FreeSync 2 HDR also has additional requirements for gaming and usability in areas not covered by VESA's DisplayHDR specifications.

We want to ensure at least 2x the perceivable color gamut and dynamic range than an SDR display as we stated from the initial announcement of the FreeSync 2 program. DisplayHDR 600 minimum specifications align with this objective, DisplayHDR 400 minimum specifications do not.

It is possible for a display to meet the FreeSync 2 HDR requirements but fail the DisplayHDR 600 minimums. Such a display may have the DIsplayHDR 400 logo and the FreeSync 2 HDR logo, but it would be exceeding the minimum requirements of DisplayHDR 400.
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34 Comments on AMD Comments on FreeSync 2 HDR Controversy

#1
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
About what I figured. Terrible name though. Should have just called it FreeSync 2.1 or something.
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#2
kastriot
At least they don't charge 500$ like Nvidia ;)
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#3
Flyordie
FordGT90Concept said:
About what I figured. Terrible name though. Should have just called it FreeSync 2.1 or something.
Or maybe "FreeSync 2X" lol. AMD seems to love the letter X.
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#4
ZoneDymo
Flyordie said:
Or maybe "FreeSync 2X" lol. AMD seems to love the letter X.
X1950 XTX
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#5
Fouquin
ZoneDymo said:
X1950 XTX
That was ATi before AMD bought them.
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#6
I No
kastriot said:
At least they don't charge 500$ like Nvidia ;)
Good thing too imagine if they would charge $500 extra for the "QC" they use...
Joking aside I rather they start charging at least it would keep a tighter control on this. As opposed to G-Sync, Freesync may vary from panel to panel, so mostly it's based on luck.
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#7
bug
I'm not sure how to read this. They are not lowering the requirements, but it's possible to slap a FreeSync2 HDR sticker on monitors that only meet HDR400. Wth?
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#8
I No
bug said:
I'm not sure how to read this. They are not lowering the requirements, but it's possible to slap a FreeSync2 HDR sticker on monitors that only meet HDR400. Wth?
Well ... if they can slap a Freesync sticker on any China made $150 2k panel ... don't think things will change with Freesync2 ....
Posted on Reply
#9
cyrand
bug said:
I'm not sure how to read this. They are not lowering the requirements, but it's possible to slap a FreeSync2 HDR sticker on monitors that only meet HDR400. Wth?
AMD certifies for FreeSync

VESA certified for HDRxxx

While there are over lap on requirements it is not completely. What they are saying is AMD Free Sync spec requirement for color gamut, max brightness and contrast ratio is higher then the VESA HDR400 requirements but lower then VESA HDR600. AMD is certifying products base on the requirements that was approved in there free-sync spec and is not looking at anything VESA is doing in there own certification process.

Therefore it possible a monitor can have FreeSync 2 HDR and HDR400.
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#10
bug
cyrand said:
AMD certifies for FreeSync

VESA certified for HDRxxx

While there are over lap on requirements it is not completely. What they are saying is AMD Free Sync spec requirement for color gamut, max brightness and contrast ratio is higher then the VESA HDR400 requirements but lower then VESA HDR600. AMD is certifying products base on the requirements that was approved in there free-sync spec and is not looking at anything VESA is doing in there own certification process.

Therefore it possible a monitor can have FreeSync 2 HDR and HDR400.
Ok, that makes sense. Having something that's neither HDR400 nor HDR600 further muddies the waters, but at least that comment makes sense now.
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#11
Gasaraki
kastriot said:
At least they don't charge 500$ like Nvidia ;)
That's how much the hardware that they actually put in the G-Sync monitors cost. Not like this sticker that AMD puts on the monitor with minimal certification and verification that it can get the rated performance that the manufacturer says it can do.
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#12
Xaled
Yeah the name is not perfect but it is no way close to "3D Vision Surround"
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#13
Imsochobo
ZoneDymo said:
X1950 XTX
ohh, I loved that card! i had one myself :)
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#14
Hood
This is more of AMD's "confuse the customer" strategy. Sad.
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#15
coonbro
I guess that's why I just buy a solid monitor with out Gstink and free stink and works well no matter what card I use NVidia or AMD . its all about there gimmickware and your money . like you buy for more money an gstink monitor and end up running a amd card then see how that extra money was well spent and being in use ..lol.... as they say fools and there money are soon parted
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#16
PrEzi
bug said:
I'm not sure how to read this. They are not lowering the requirements, but it's possible to slap a FreeSync2 HDR sticker on monitors that only meet HDR400. Wth?
If it has been certified for Freesync 2 BEFORE FreeSync 2 HDR name/spec. change then obviously you can use this sticker.
You (manufacturer) are however not allowed to "upgrade" the FS2 badge to FS2 HDR by yourself.

So in short -- look for FS2 HDR and not FS2.
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#17
nemesis.ie
ZoneDymo said:
X1950 XTX
Wasn't there an XTX X1950 XTX XXX edition?

@PrEzi: @cyrand's post has it right.
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#18
bug
nemesis.ie said:
Wasn't there an XTX X1950 XTX XXX edition?

@PrEzi: @cyrand's post has it right.
I thought of exactly the same thing. But XFX wasn't making video cards when 1950 was with us.
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#19
medi01
TVs can slap "HDR" on them with no certification whatsoever.
Suddenly we care about Monitors misleading about it, wow.

Gasaraki said:
That's how much the hardware that they actually put in the G-Sync monitors cost.
As calculated by well known all encompassing experts, such as south eastern part of Mr Gasaraki's body.

FordGT90Concept said:
About what I figured. Terrible name though. Should have just called it FreeSync 2.1 or something.
Why on Earth?
FS 2 is about several things, ONE OF THEM HDR and not simply passing it over, but pre-calculating stuff in GPU, to reduce lag.

HDR and DisplayHDR XXX are not the same thing.
HDR and Ultra HD Premium are not the same thing.

Heck, and what is the deal with "barely meet VESA's DisplayHDR 400 standards"? There are many monitors out there which don't, pretty cool if FS2 mandates specs that are at least above DisplayHDR 400.

Looks like someone is creating "controversy" out of nothing.
Posted on Reply
#20
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
medi01 said:
TVs can slap "HDR" on them with no certification whatsoever.
Suddenly we care about Monitors misleading about it, wow.
Yes, but they can't slap "DisplayHDR" on them without certification. VESA did take their time establishing an HDR standard for displays but better late than never.


FreeSync 2 HDR is literally just a rebrand of FreeSync 2 (took a while for that to click). FreeSync 2's HDR requirements land between DisplayHDR 400 and Display HDR 600. All FreeSync 2 (HDR) panels will exceed DisplayHDR 400 but not all will exceed DisplayHDR 600; ergo, all FreeSync 2 HDR displays at least qualify for DisplayHDR 400 but some may qualify for DisplayHDR 600 branding.

I thought AMD's intent with FreeSync 2 HDR was to align FreeSync 2 with DisplayHDR 600. I was wrong.
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#21
bug
medi01 said:
HDR and DisplayHDR XXX are not the same thing.
HDR and Ultra HD Premium are not the same thing.
Care to go into details?

medi01 said:
Heck, and what is the deal with "barely meet VESA's DisplayHDR 400 standards"? There are many monitors out there which don't, pretty cool if FS2 mandates specs that are at least above DisplayHDR 400.
DisplayHDR 400 means pretty much any monitor out there that's not bottom of the barrel. It doesn't raise the bar at all, it literally means sRGB with 350cd/sqm and no dithering.

Personally, I think DisplayHDR 600 is the minimum required for a proper HDR experience. But since you can count the DisplayHDR 600 certified monitors on the finger on one hand, I can understand why FreeSync 2 specs were set below that. Still, it means they lowered the bar (i.e. compromised user experience) in order to get their sticker on something.
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#22
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
bug said:
DisplayHDR 400 means pretty much any monitor out there that's not bottom of the barrel. It doesn't raise the bar at all, it literally means sRGB with 350cd/sqm and no dithering.
So very wrong.
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#23
bug
Care to point what in your post contradicts anything I've said?
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#24
medi01
FordGT90Concept said:
I thought AMD's intent with FreeSync 2 HDR was to align FreeSync 2 with DisplayHDR 600.
FS2 was announced before DisplayHDR certification, how could AMD align with anything?

When you see "GSync HDR" what does it tell you in terms of "DisplayHDR" certification?


AMD's adding of "HDR" to FreeSync solves their problem of customers misreading "GSync HDR" vs "FreeSync 2" as "oh, the latter doesn't support HDR", when, in fact, HDR support is one of it's major features.

It doesn't mislead anyone who wasn't already mislead.

bug said:
Care to go into details?
HDR literally means "high dynamic range" it is not a certification, you can write it down and slap it on your car, if you wish.

Nearly all "HDR" TVs without Premium UHD certification hardly produce anything beyond SDR gamut.
Posted on Reply
#25
bug
medi01 said:
HDR literally means "high dynamic range" it is not a certification, you can write it down and slap it on your car, if you wish.

Nearly all "HDR" TVs without Premium UHD certification hardly produce anything beyond SDR gamut.
Yeah, somehow we've ended up with different standards for handling HDR input and outputting HDR content. It's going to confuse the crap out of users.
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