Monday, November 5th 2018

SeaSonic Announces US Market Pricing Changes

SeaSonic announced price increases for its entire product lineup in the US market, effective December 1st. The price increases are in response to increased import tariffs for electronics goods from China. The increases appear to be in the range of 5 to 10 percent over current MSRPs for the higher-range products, and up to 20 percent higher for some of the lower-end ones. Below is a statement from SeaSonic, followed by its revised price-list:
Effective 01 December 2018, Sea Sonic USA is to increase the MSRP for all power supplies manufactured in China and destined for the US market. This is the result of recent market developments, but all orders placed prior to this date shall follow current pricing. SeaSonic strives to be transparent and forthright with its partners and consumers. We thank you in advance for your understanding as our priority is to continue providing cost-effective solutions to all our customers. The situation is dynamic and necessary adjustments will be made accordingly. We greatly appreciate your support and look forward to continuing our partnership well into the future.
Add your own comment

38 Comments on SeaSonic Announces US Market Pricing Changes

#1
Durvelle27
Man consumers are getting screwed every which way.
Posted on Reply
#2
xkm1948
Hasn’t EU people been paying such high price for years? (And Australia?). Maybe this is just the new norm now
Posted on Reply
#3
IceScreamer
"xkm1948 said:
Hasn’t EU people been paying such high price for years? (And Australia?). Maybe this is just the new norm now
On average I'd say even higher prices for EU. Haven't checked other countries but in Croatia for example the Focus Plus 550W is $107, compared to the new price of $89.99. So yea, still significantly cheaper in the US, even with tariffs.
Posted on Reply
#4
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
"IceScreamer said:
On average I'd say even higher prices for EU. Haven't checked other countries but in Croatia for example the Focus Plus 550W is $107, compared to the new price of $89.99. So yea, still significantly cheaper in the US, even with tariffs.
Yeah, but that is with the XX% tax on top of it. This increase makes the Focus Plus 550 about $9 cheaper in Sweden than the US MSRP.

So $5-10 on mid-lower end units, $20 on the high end units.
Posted on Reply
#5
lexluthermiester
"Durvelle27 said:
Man consumers are getting screwed every which way.
Costs are going up. They always do. Companies have to make one of two choices;
1. Raise prices
2. Make products of lesser quality.
Posted on Reply
#6
IceScreamer
"Frick said:
Yeah, but that is with the XX% tax on top of it. This increase makes the Focus Plus 550 about $9 cheaper in Sweden than the US MSRP.

So $5-10 on mid-lower end units, $20 on the high end units.
Ah you're right, I completely disregarded that.
Posted on Reply
#7
CrAsHnBuRnXp
Id rather have companies make quality products for slightly more money rather than lesser quality for cheaper.
Posted on Reply
#8
E-curbi
Oh no, this is going to become a thread about politics instead of hardware. :ohwell:

...quietly tiptoes away.
Posted on Reply
#9
Slizzo
"CrAsHnBuRnXp said:
Id rather have companies make quality products for slightly more money rather than lesser quality for cheaper.
Yeah but the companies aren't even really seeing this money. It's going straight to the tariffs that our Orange in Chief imposed.
Posted on Reply
#10
m4dn355
Here we go double edged sword. . .
Posted on Reply
#12
Ferrum Master
"E-curbi said:
Oh no, this is going to become a thread about politics instead of hardware. :ohwell:

...quietly tiptoes away.
Calling @FordGT90Concept

Do it mate :D
Posted on Reply
#13
ironwolf
Doesn't the tariff go up in January? Is this price increase going to go up after that or is this basically their (SeaSonic) price increase to combat that?
Posted on Reply
#14
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
"lexluthermiester said:
Costs are going up. They always do. Companies have to make one of two choices;
1. Raise prices
2. Make products of lesser quality.
I think it is ironic that these price increase are a direct response to new import tariffs, which were put in place to try to get manufacturing moved away from China, and none of the options you came up with actually includes move manufacturing away from China.:laugh:
Posted on Reply
#15
kastriot
Go and say "thank you" to Tramp, especially those who voted for him..
Posted on Reply
#16
GreiverBlade
well ... since i live in EU zone (but not a part of EU ) my Seasonic M12II EVO 750 was already overprices compared to MSRP :laugh: ...
Posted on Reply
#17
Tomorrow
"xkm1948 said:
Hasn’t EU people been paying such high price for years? (And Australia?). Maybe this is just the new norm now
Indeed we have. I bought the 1000W Prime Titanium earlier this year for 280€ (319$). Currently the cheapest in my country is 284€. Even with the price increase the same model has a MSRP of ~244€ in US so it's still cheaper than in most of the EU.

The cheapest i found was 240€ in EU: https://geizhals.eu/seasonic-prime-ultra-titanium-1000w-atx-2-4-ssr-1000tr-a1712525.html
Posted on Reply
#18
xorbe
Glad I got my uber PC with Seasonic 850W Ultra Titanium Prime finished recently with the video card being the last part late to the party.
Posted on Reply
#19
Xx Tek Tip xX
@FordGT90Concept I told you the Trade war is pulling up prices :kookoo:
"Ferrum Master said:
Calling @FordGT90Concept
Your welcome :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#20
Assimilator
I'm sure the usual suspects will be here soon to tell us this is all part of a master plan (that's somehow never detailed to anyone) and that it'll make the manufacturing jobs come back.

Those jobs have been coming back for a long time. They'll be here any day now, I'm certain of it.
Posted on Reply
#21
Casecutter
Nice of them to actually say we will see this and be ready for it... not sure many will announce that this is passed-back to the US government as the new "shake-down" of doing business in US markets. Or, I break your legs with a baseball bat.

I just wonder if there is an actual accounting of this money the USA is collecting and a reporting of where it will be used?
Posted on Reply
#22
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
"Ferrum Master said:
Calling @FordGT90Concept

Do it mate :D
Nope, this was expected. Other manufacturers will be doing the same. They may eat some of the costs of the tariffs but certainly not all of it.

"Casecutter said:
I just wonder if there is an actual accounting of this money the USA is collecting and a reporting of where it will be used?
Tariffs are collected by the federal government and go into the federal coffers. Like most taxes, it doesn't have a predetermined use that it's guaranteed for when collected. It just goes into the pool that is the US Treasury and gets spent paying federal debts.
Posted on Reply
#23
FeelinFroggy
"newtekie1 said:
I think it is ironic that these price increase are a direct response to new import tariffs, which were put in place to try to get manufacturing moved away from China, and none of the options you came up with actually includes move manufacturing away from China.:laugh:
Unemployment is at 3.7%. It has never been this low in the history of the US. This is not about manufacturing jobs. It is about unfair IP and trade practices. China has been stealing from the US and other countries for decades. This is about the only time this can happen because the economy is strong enough to still grow despite a trade war.

I don't like higher prices anymore than anyone else. But these tariffs wont last forever. China has few American imports they can impose tariffs whereas this is just the tip of the iceberg for the US when it comes to Chinese imports. China has everything to lose here and they have to have US consumers buy their products to keep food on their table.
Posted on Reply
#24
xkm1948
I do like lower unemployment rate. Empowering people to make a living is always better.
Posted on Reply
#25
jboydgolfer
"xkm1948 said:
Hasn’t EU people been paying such high price for years? (And Australia?). Maybe this is just the new norm now
Even More.



there are many sides to the trade/Tariff argument. History offers insight as well as fact/reality, and current economic conditions. I feel in my opinion, that the following is more the reality that you arent allowed to see without Wading through endless liberal/Democrat Rag pieces, of bashing literally anything Trump does, including tariffs. In my opininion, the benefits will far out weigh the bad. No nation can win a war with the US (especially a trade war) & Trump knows this. My only fear in this situation is fighting trade wars with more than one nation, as it looks like we may begin to do. If you take the five minutes to read the piece I put in the spoiler below, you'll see why people like Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and others, Republicans as well as Democrats ,have so much motivation to fight for government positions of power. Sadly a lot of their motivation has very little to do with what's going on inside the United States and often ,has a lot to do with making money outside of it, by offering "easy" access to sell inside of it, cheaply. The more you learn about the facts, the easier it becomes to realize why so many are trying to scare the public off the idea of change. Everybody makes mistakes, and I don't think Donald Trump is immune to making them either, nor do I believe everything he does is perfect, but I do believe its time for a change, & i do believe his motives are good.

[SPOILER="From Daniel Mcarthy at the spectator"]
Supporters of the global free-trade regime that has been built up over the past 25 years like to think of themselves as capitalists. Benevolent capitalists, perhaps — ones who have only the interests of the world’s poorest workers and their own nations’ least wealthy consumers at heart — but capitalists nonetheless. So why is the biggest beneficiary of their world order in fact the last of the great, deadly serious Communist states — the People’s Republic of China?


Trump’s tariffs, far from being the end of the liberal economic order, may be the one thing that can save it. That order, after all, to an embarrassing degree depends upon America’s dominant position in the world. After the second world war, America helped to rebuild the industrial economies of friends and former foes alike. Even as American goods flooded Europe — or at least those corners of the Continent that could afford them — Washington dedicated extraordinary quantities of taxpayers’ dollars to other countries’ needs. The Marshall Plan was only a fraction of the real cost, which included above all the military support that America supplied. Building a welfare state is much easier when someone else is picking up your national defence tab. American motives were not entirely altruistic, but it was a good deal for Europe, and East Asian allies too.


By the 1980s, though, the system started to crack. American industry had been so far ahead for so long, and had grown so large and so lazy, that it began to lose its competitive edge. Japan and Germany, the old foes who were the greatest beneficiaries of the American order, continued to rely on Washington’s defence largesse even as they began to compete as peers — or more than peers — with American industry. Washington itself, meanwhile, seeing the benighted state of many domestic manufacturers, decided that a dose of international competition was the cure. China took note. So did American firms that decided they could maximise their shareholder revenue and their executives’ compensation by dismantling their own production chains: they could lay off an expensive American workforce and hire a cheaper one in Mexico or Asia; and they could outsource the components of their products — cell phones, computers, cars, even fighter jets — to specialist manufacturers in countries whose governments and business elites jointly put a priority on the most high-value and technical kinds of manufacturing. While the American business elite fascinated itself with chatter about brands and intellectual property and making products cheaper all the time, savvier countries focused on being able to do the making best. Meanwhile, US taxpayers continued to be on the hook for Cold War allies’ defence, even though the world economic conditions and domestic industrial advantages that had allowed America to be so generous had long since evaporated.


No one can blame Europe or Japan for taking advantage of a system that lets them have it both ways for as long as it lasts: a system that lets them shift the burden of defence — any state’s first imperative — on to a friendly hegemon, even while working assiduously to tear apart the hegemon’s industry.


The present broken world economic system will continue to empower China relative to the US for as long as China lets it run. President Xi Jinping would be happy to see it run forever — or at least until it reveals that America is no longer strong enough to be plausible as even a nostalgic hegemon. At that point, China will have won a world war without firing a shot.


The tariffs shock American elites because they show that Trump does not believe in the myth of infinite American power — so vast that the moment of supremacy after the second world war need never end — and they endanger the elite’s scam of getting rich off chopping up and selling American industry. European leaders are shocked that their free ride might come to an end: they cannot continue to receive a subsidy from Washington — in the form of defence — while they chip away at the American economy that makes the subsidy possible. And China is shocked that the self-liquidating superpower of the West might not be so self-liquidating after all.


Trump’s instincts are correct. No major country on earth can successfully retaliate against America in a trade war, for the simple reason that America has trade deficits with them all. America has proven more than once that its large and rich internal market can support itself, and if consumer prices rise, there is a point up to which a marginally more expensive flat-screen TV is worth the higher price in exchange for more Americans making those TVs in the first place. The calculation isn’t simply an economic one, but a strategic one too. Steel is a place to start because it shows in clear terms how the entire global economic scam works. China subsidises its industry and produces so much steel that the world price falls. This is uneconomical, but strategically smart. Allies of the US lower prices accordingly — sometimes they have their own elaborate forms of indirect protection, and sometimes they simply re-import Chinese steel — and the US steel industry, once the world’s leader, shrinks. American industries that depend on steel then come to depend more on imports, and ultimately on the Chinese subsidy for the global market. When American steel production has been weakened enough — it’s not an industry that can be rebuilt in a day — China can cut its subsidies, watch prices rise, and gain tremendous leverage over everyone who needs steel, including the steel-using industries of what was once the world’s sole superpower, the United States: no longer a nation of power producers, but one of dependent consumers.


[/SPOILER]
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment