Monday, January 21st 2019

Kingston's A2000 NVMe SSDs - Aiming at Sub-SATA SSD Pricing On Toshiba's BiCS4 3D TLC NAND

Kingston at CES 2019 demonstrated its A2000 NVMe SSDs, which the company has developed with a specific goal in mind - undercut SATA-based SSDs. This has, until now, been impossible, due to increased costs of NVMe controllers over their SATA counterparts, but such is the trend with any technology - prices do come down after a product is first introduced. Some NVMe solutions have used cut-down controllers that only supported PCIe x2 buses, but not the A2000 - they will use full-fledged PCIe 4x lanes, and will be available in 240, 480, or 960 GB capacities.

The A2000 series will make use of different controllers, which means Kingston is sourcing from more than one manufacturer (Silicon Motion's SM2263-series and Phison's low-cost controllers). While that could introduce performance variations, Kingston says that they will be making sure the experience and performance stays consistent between differently-sourced products, and that the only reason for this is to decrease overall BOM costs to achieve a lineup-wide below-SATA cost. NVMe drives typically require less materials than SATA drives, and as a plus, aren't constrained by link bandwidth limitations. This is huge news for the industry, because if Kingston manages to do its bidding 2Q2019, as they expect, the industry will follow suit - they won't be leaving the lowest-priced, and consequently, likely highest-volume product, to a single player. Kingston is quoting up to 2000 MB/s sequential read speeds as well as up to 1500 MB/s sequential write speeds.
Source: AnandTech
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6 Comments on Kingston's A2000 NVMe SSDs - Aiming at Sub-SATA SSD Pricing On Toshiba's BiCS4 3D TLC NAND

#1
bonehead123
2000/1500.... p.U.h.L.e.E.e.Z........

whats the point, other than a money grab for the bottom barrel end of things :)
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#2
Raevenlord
News Editor
bonehead123, post: 3979022, member: 139670"
2000/1500.... p.U.h.L.e.E.e.Z........

whats the point, other than a money grab for the bottom barrel end of things :)
Ehrm... 4x and 3x SATA performance at lower pricing? How many people actually require cutting-edge hardware?
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#3
BakerMan1971
Raevenlord, post: 3979035, member: 166527"
Ehrm... 4x and 3x SATA performance at lower pricing? How many people actually require cutting-edge hardware?
Agreed there are many uses for drives at this level, especially if the pricing is that good
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#4
bonehead123
Raevenlord, post: 3979035, member: 166527"
How many people actually require cutting-edge hardware?
MEEEEE......cause I don't do bottom of the barrel feeding. I don't actually require it, but me wantz it...and IMO, 2000/1500 aint it in any way, shape or form :)

I'll gladly pay just a few $$ more for a drive that runs at 3500/2500, of which there are many out there, or soon to be, especially with the current trend of falling prices !
Posted on Reply
#5
hat
Enthusiast
Enjoy spending more money for bigger numbers from CrystalDiskMark, then. Unless you're literally bouncing huge files around daily, there's no reason for a faster drive. Personally I don't even care about NVMe at all, until now, with this supposedly cheaper drive...
Posted on Reply
#6
Zerofool
That's a good start. Now they need to add a 2 TB model (OK, 1.875 TB) with endurance rating of at least 1,100 TBW and priced below $280. Maybe then I'll get really excited.
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