Monday, February 18th 2019

Zotac Announces Liquid-Cooling Ready GeForce RTX 2080 Ti ArcticStorm Graphics Card

ZOTAC Technology, a global manufacturer of innovation is pleased to announce the launch of the ZOTAC GAMING GeForce RTX 2080 Ti ArcticStorm graphics card. Get the best of both worlds with the all-new waterblocked graphics card packing the ultimate 2080 Ti performance with 16+4 power phases combined with fearless cooling. Continuing to push on design and innovation, the full coverage waterblock introduces a precision machine laser etched design entirely new to the design process.

The carved edges and added texture bring dimension to the clear acrylic block and enables it to catch the lighting lit across the block beautifully to enhance the overall design in a very discrete, elegant fashion. The lighting gets updated to SPECTRA 2.0, bringing with it more powerful Addressable RGB LEDs controllable with the newly designed Firestorm software. Adjust brightness and lighting modes on two independent zones or synchronize them together in unison lighting. With an onboard memory, your preferred lighting settings will stay whether the system restarts or shuts down.
The ArcticStorm waterblock utilizes a direct nickel plated copper cold block contact with precision 0.3mm micro-channels for maximum heat extraction supported by a metal backplate. Equipped with the standard G 1/4 threaded fittings placed in back-to-back horizontal alignment, the Zotac Gaming GeForce RTX 2080 Ti ArcticStorm is compatible with a wide range of liquid cooling solutions already available on the market. A pair of barbs supporting 10mm ID tubing are also included.
Source: ZOTAC
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14 Comments on Zotac Announces Liquid-Cooling Ready GeForce RTX 2080 Ti ArcticStorm Graphics Card

#1
Robcostyle
And no price revealed, as always.

Guess, 1800$ then? Selling for 1750-1950$ where I live - like this one.
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#2
SystemMechanic
On twitter i was told by zotac that its aluminium plated with Nickel.
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#3
Slizzo
Robcostyle, post: 3996926, member: 176192"
And no price revealed, as always.

Guess, 1800$ then? Selling for 1750-1950$ where I live - like this one.
Wouldn't expect them to go much higher than the Gigabyte and EVGA versions. EVGA sells their HydroCopper FTW3 for $1600 I believe from their site. I think the Gigabyte Waterforce is around $1500?
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#4
dj-electric
A 999$-1050$ card with a 140$ block for 1500$+?
No deal.
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#5
Breit
Another missed chance to make the card looking really sleek in making it a single-slot card and put the power connectors on the side. Too bad.
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#6
TheDeeGee
The premium price is because of the those yellow sleeved splitter cables :P
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#7
the54thvoid
Pointless block unless the power threshold is seriously amped up. These cards don't like the power ceiling, so temps are a secondary issue. Even for noise, the AIB's (well, MSI, ASUS) have good cooling solutions.
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#8
Razrback16
If they could sell it for what it's actually worth, which is around $850 due to the pre-installed WB, they'd sell a bunch of these. But since it'll no doubt be selling for ~$1300-1600 thanks to nothing but hype from NVidia, I don't see them selling many of these. Pretty card though. Maybe I'll watch for them on ebay in a year or two.
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#9
kinjx11
if the memory is Micron then I won't be near this thing , i dont want a dead 2080ti under water
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#10
John Naylor
Robcostyle, post: 3996926, member: 176192"
And no price revealed, as always.

Guess, 1800$ then? Selling for 1750-1950$ where I live - like this one.
The MSI Seahawk EK X w/ EK block is < $1400 in US....same price as the Gaming X Trio

And that's the one I'd lean too given EK's quality (Hydrocopper has never been a sound choice) ... however. every tome I have checked, they ... well everybody pretty much is putting the block's on their lower end PCBs. Pairing their best PCB with the water block is something I haven't seen yet. Would love to see an article listing all these preinstalled WB cards listing the PCB and which model it's on when on air.

Razrback16, post: 3997164, member: 177333"
If they could sell it for what it's actually worth, which is around $850 due to the pre-installed WB, they'd sell a bunch of these. But since it'll no doubt be selling for ~$1300-1600 thanks to nothing but hype from NVidia, I don't see them selling many of these. Pretty card though. Maybe I'll watch for them on ebay in a year or two.
They are selling for "what the market will bear". It's called capitalism... corporations are bound to maximize profits for their shareholders. Board members can be canned even charged with malfeasance for failure to do otherwise. If they are selling as fast as you can build them, a price cut is not in the cards. If the public doesn't want to pay those prices, they sikply need to exercise restraint and stop buying them.

kinjx11, post: 3997209, member: 164821"
if the memory is Micron then I won't be near this thing , i dont want a dead 2080ti under water
As mentioned above, the tendency has been to pair the water block with lower end PCBs, so that's not likely. AFAIK, the only 2080 Ti TPU has tested w/ Samsung memory among the 8 cards they did test was the Lightning. Interesting thing is that, while the Samsung is touted for it's higher OCs, higher memory clocks (and higher core clocks for that matter) are still not correlating to the highest fps.

The highest Core Clock (among the typical "gamer" AIB line), that TPU was able to manage was on the Zotac Amp (2145) which came in 5th place fps wise in TPU testing. The highest memory OC was 2065 which was on the Strix, which came in 4th place. MSI Gaming X Trio edged the EVGA FTW for highest fps and the Gaming X was tied for 5th in Core OC and tie for 4th in memory OC.

I haven't been paying attention as won't be doing any 2xxx series bulds till at least March and won't be recommending the 2080 / 2080 Ti's at current price levels anyway, but has a "cause" ever been determined for the early failures ? First everyone was blaming the Micron memory ... then that was disproved, then was some chatter about height tolerances and over pressure when cooler was applied. Haven't seen any new theories or official explanations either way or is it just being attributed to the bleeding edge blues of not all the kinks being worked out and poor yields that are not at all unusual in early steppings.
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#11
Razrback16
John Naylor, post: 3997298, member: 156078"
They are selling for "what the market will bear". It's called capitalism... corporations are bound to maximize profits for their shareholders. Board members can be canned even charged with malfeasance for failure to do otherwise. If they are selling as fast as you can build them, a price cut is not in the cards. If the public doesn't want to pay those prices, they sikply need to exercise restraint and stop buying them.
That's just it though, they're not selling that well. That's one of the key reasons NVidia has adjusted their earnings projections and their stock has taken a hit, having lost some ~45% of its value in the last ~4 months.

https://www.techradar.com/news/nvidia-lowers-fourth-quarter-predictions-after-poor-turing-rtx-gpu-sales
https://www.pcgamer.com/nvidia-ceo-laments-low-turing-sales-says-last-quarter-was-a-punch-in-the-gut/

Based on a number of the reports I've read (the links above are just a couple I quickly yanked off Google), many folks have sent a very clear message to NVidia that the pricing they've got on these things is utterly absurd. The performance is pathetic for the price they are asking, yet so far we're still not seeing any pricing adjustments from NVidia for Turing. They seem content with people not buying their products, which is a pretty weird way to maximize profits for their sharehoulders IMHO.
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#12
John Naylor
Selling well doesn't matter if you have cards to sell. You can't sell what you don't have, you can't earn money on what you can't keep on the shelves. Until demand catches up with supply, price is irrelevant.

https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#c=424&sort=price&page=1
20 cards in stock, / 21 not available. So it's not as if the cards are sitting on the shelves day after day gathering dust, it's because they are leaving the shelves faster than they can put them back. Until consumers exercise some restrain't and let that happen,... or AMD comes up with a competitor to challenge anything above the 2070, that's not going to happen. If consumers were sending the message you assumed, nothing would ever be out of stock.

With half the models out of stock on any given day, no one has in the supply chain has an incentive to reduce prices. This is reflected in the prices. TPU tested 7 "gamer level" 2080 Tis ... the top performer was the MSI Gaming X Trio ... not in stock at newegg and only 4 MSI models are in stock, 2 of them water cooled designs. So yes, they might sell more cards at lower prices, but since they can't get more cards, it's hardly relevant.
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#13
Razrback16
If a lack of cards to sell was the issue, I would imagine NVidia would have reported things differently to their shareholders versus telling them that they're disappointed in Turing's sales.

This is from the PC Gamer article I linked:

"Nvidia had hoped that Turing would bolster its GPU sales, pinning its hopes on gamers being enamored with the added performance and especially the feature upgrades, such as real-time ray tracing support and DLSS capabilities. For various reasons, though, Nvidia's RTX cards have not met Nvidia's sales expectations.

"These products deliver a revolutionary leap in performance and innovation with real-time ray tracing and AI, but some customers may have delayed their purchase while waiting for lower price points and further demonstrations of RTX technology in actual games," Nvidia said. "

So with all due respect to your opinion, I'll go with what I'm actually seeing, and what NVidia is reporting. Bottom line is Turing's performance doesn't justify its pricetag and many consumers are waiting for a price drop or better performance (or both).
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#14
Dr_b_
Razrback16, post: 3997828, member: 177333"
If a lack of cards to sell was the issue, I would imagine NVidia would have reported things differently to their shareholders versus telling them that they're disappointed in Turing's sales.
.
I agree with this, just because a part is out of stock, doesn't mean its selling well.

Then there is the whole ordeal with the failing parts, and no public messaging on root cause of the problem or how anyone could be assured if buying a $1500
card is a safe thing to do.

nvidia also hasn't sold the market on RTX tech, at least at the price point they are asking

Cool tech, Ray Tracing, but too much of a performance hit, and the cost of entry is far too high and there are reliability concerns, only a few titles that can use it as well as power consumption, heat, etc.
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