Thursday, February 28th 2019

AMD Showcases FreeSync 2 HDR Technology With Oasis Demo

AMD is looking to further push the adoption of FreeSync with the release of FreeSync 2 HDR Technology. The primary goal of the new standard is to take what FreeSync already offered including wide variable refresh rates and low framerate compensation and to pair that with HDR for a truly immersive experience. To show off what FreeSync 2 can do while also pushing for broader adoption has resulted in AMD creating their new Oasis Demo. Following the familiar principle that seeing is believing, AMD will be looking to compare their FreeSync 2 monitors against their non-HDR counterparts with this new demo at retail locations. This will allow consumers to see the difference for themselves in a way static images and youtube videos cannot convey. The Demo itself has been built using Unreal Engine 4 and has full support for HDR10 and FreeSync 2 HDR transport protocols. When it comes to settings the demo packs numerous options including FPS limits with various presets or custom options, vertical sync on/off, FreeSync on/off, Content modes, etc. You can view AMD's overview of the Demo in the video below.

Source: AMD
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29 Comments on AMD Showcases FreeSync 2 HDR Technology With Oasis Demo

#26
John Naylor
In an era where much of the gaming community's goals are all about 144 / 165 Hz. I think AMD needs to offer something I'll call "FreesyncPlus" with Motion Blur Reduction technology. For that crowd, the best thing that can be said about Freesync is "you get what you pay for". Being able to offer FreeSync for those playing most games at 40 - 75 fps will be attractive to those with budget and midrange cards, but a "FreesyncPlus" option with the necessary hardware module would allow them to compete in an arena that currently nVidia has all to itself.

Model ABC 27QFS ($450) - comes with FreeSync
Model ABC 27QFSP ($575) - comes with FreeSyncPlus

Could even offer update kits like nVidia did w/ the Asus VG248QE
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#27
las
Zubasa
VA in general is not great for response time, I agree.
But IPS and TN monitors are not always better.
For example the TN PG278Q on average is actually slower than the IPS PG279Q, and the non-HDR 3440x1440 PG348Q has worse input lag than the 4k PG27UQ
Also at least for average input lag the C32HG70 which is the 32 inch version is actually not the slowest, compare to the TN XG35VQ.
http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/asus_rog_swift_pg27uq.htm#lag

Yes, but that is input lag, not response times and this is where VA has issues. Even with strobed backlight features (as in faster / fastest enabled on the C27HG70).

The issue (for some) is when using faster and fastest settings here - The brightness goes way down, just like ULMB and WITHOUT faster or fastest enabled, the smearing and blur will be MUCH WORSE.

Comparison (from TFT Central)

Low Input Lag Mode OFF vs ON
Total Display Lag (SMTT 2) 25.10 vs 7.00
Estimated Signal Processing Lag 18.60 vs 0.50


Input lag can be just fine on VA monitors! Response time is the main issues for fast paced games.
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#28
mtcn77
las
Yes, but that is input lag, not response times and this is where VA has issues. Even with strobed backlight features (as in faster / fastest enabled on the C27HG70).

The issue (for some) is when using faster and fastest settings here - The brightness goes way down, just like ULMB and WITHOUT faster or fastest enabled, the smearing and blur will be MUCH WORSE.

Comparison (from TFT Central)

Low Input Lag Mode OFF vs ON
Total Display Lag (SMTT 2) 25.10 vs 7.00
Estimated Signal Processing Lag 18.60 vs 0.50


Input lag can be just fine on VA monitors! Response time is the main issues for fast paced games.
Please, stick to your narrative. You are making it harder to resolve for yourself. First, you assumed a conclusion, now your statements are spanning VA as a whole.
Now that we went over input lag, the issue that you are experiencing not to resolve itself is 'clouding' - reverse tracing in non-VA terms. Best practices are 100Hz - MBR. However, Samsung has removed the feature activation, it being activated by default at higher pixel voltage settings. It is a simple OSD issue if they would only enable installing the launch OSD driver for CFG70 Series. So, the settings are just listed their utmost counterproductively; pixel blurry and pixel cloudy options are all there is. You could try the middle, though, and try 100Hz hoping for the best.
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#29
Vayra86
MrGenius
Does HDR help with, or better yet eliminate, color banding? I was just looking at one of these FreeSync 2 HDR400 monitors, and it says "HDR400 specifies true 8-bit image quality". And I'm like...you lost me at 8-bit....see ya! Already made that mistake and deeply regretting it. If you can call it a mistake. As it's not advertised, ALMOST EVER, whether a specific monitor is 8-bit or not. So I had no clue, and/or any way of knowing ahead of time, what I was getting. Not only that though. I didn't even know what it was, and why I should care. How come that's not pretty much the most important specification that's given, or even a major topic of discussion? I mean...Jesus...is there anything worse than color banding? I have to not play games where it shows up now...or I feel like throwing this $450 POS out the window. Sickening...
A big part of color banding is calibration, when you have a nice flat grayscale and low deltaE color errors you have a panel that can eliminate most of the banding - caused by the monitor. There is also a banding source in the content itself, compression for example can cause banding artifacts as well.

You'd be surprised how many people are sitting in front of a badly calibrated monitor. One part of that is brightness, most monitors have an ideal brightness in the lower regions of the settings bar, yet most monitors are set for brightness > 50. Contrast is another such thing, the amount of people that crush whites and blacks and have no clue is staggering.

Color accuracy on TVs is only a recent thing. Most TVs used to oversaturate and panels contained major deltaE errors when you use the regular settings menu. For monitors, color accuracy became a thing with the introduction of mainstream IPS, simply because its almost always accurate and people noticed, as they came from a crappy TN.

With the HDR spec, VESA effectively legitimized poor display technologies supported by a brighter backlight. Its nothing other than that. Luckily you also see progress on the panel tech side of things, (Quantum Dot, OLED, improved VA) because people aren't stupid these days, there is a real demand for quality displays and we are aware of LCD shortcomings.

las
Yes, but that is input lag, not response times and this is where VA has issues. Even with strobed backlight features (as in faster / fastest enabled on the C27HG70).

The issue (for some) is when using faster and fastest settings here - The brightness goes way down, just like ULMB and WITHOUT faster or fastest enabled, the smearing and blur will be MUCH WORSE.

Comparison (from TFT Central)

Low Input Lag Mode OFF vs ON
Total Display Lag (SMTT 2) 25.10 vs 7.00
Estimated Signal Processing Lag 18.60 vs 0.50


Input lag can be just fine on VA monitors! Response time is the main issues for fast paced games.
VA's smearing does little for competitiveness, the rest of the panel's color range is nice and fast, often even faster than IPS. With strobing, its very easy to get used to. But this is a personal thing, and a trade off as always; against IPS glow and low static contrast, or against TN's viewing angles.

However I am adamant VA needs a strobing backlight. The motion clarity takes a tremendous leap forward, its hard to beat.
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