Friday, March 22nd 2019

EK Water Blocks Releases EK-Vector Series Water Blocks for AMD Radeon VII

EK Water Blocks, the leading premium computer liquid cooling gear manufacturer, is releasing EK-Vector Radeon VII water blocks that are compatible with reference design AMD Radeon VII graphics cards. This kind of efficient cooling will allow your high-end graphics card to reach higher boost clocks, thus providing more overclocking headroom and more performance during gaming or other GPU intense tasks.

This water block directly cools the GPU, 16GB of HBM2 memory, and VRM (voltage regulation module) as cooling liquid is channeled directly over these critical areas. These newly developed water blocks feature a redesigned cooling engine that has a larger footprint compared to the previous generation of EK Full Cover water blocks. This results in a larger surface area for heat transfer which increases the thermal performance of these water blocks.
The base of the block is made of high-grade copper or nickel-plated electrolytic copper while the top is made of high-quality acrylic material or POM Acetal material (depending on the variant). The front aesthetic corner piece is lit up with LED strip (in RGB variants). The top material does not affect the block performance in any way. The block also features a special plastic cover over the block Terminal. This add-on is designed to reveal the graphics card model, visible from the side. Sealing is ensured by high-quality EPDM O-Rings. The brass standoffs are already pre-installed and allow for a safe and easy installation procedure.

The EK-Vector Radeon VII water blocks are compatible with popular RGB sync technologies from all major motherboard manufacturers since it features a classic 4-pin 12V RGB LED strip.

The EK-Vector Radeon VII water blocks are compatible with the reference design Radeon VII graphics cards.

Liquid cooling your Radeon VII GPU will allow you to overclock it to the maximum clock allowed by the card and reach 10-20% better results depending on workload or game you're playing. Even while overclocked your card will reach far lower temperatures and less noise than factory clocked with air cooling ensuring an even longer lifespan of the card.

Availability and pricing
The EK-Vector Radeon VII water blocks and backplates are made in Slovenia, Europe and are available for pre-order through the EK Webshop or EK Partner Reseller Network. EK-Vector Radeon VII water blocks and backplates will start shipping Monday, 1st of April 2019.
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34 Comments on EK Water Blocks Releases EK-Vector Series Water Blocks for AMD Radeon VII

#2
jesdals
Why are the nikkelplatet versions more expensive?
Posted on Reply
#3
Ferrum Master
jesdals said:
Why are the nikkelplatet versions more expensive?
Because it involves additional anodizing process? It ain't that easy...
Posted on Reply
#4
phill
It's such a shame that they charge so much for the blocks.. If they where a bit cheaper then more people would actually use them... Such a shame :( But I hope TPU does a review on the block with the AMD card.. Be very interesting to see if anything much changes....
Posted on Reply
#5
kapone32
It will be very interesting to see how a 7nm card handles water cooling. I used a water block on my Vega 64 and even though I have not overclocked it I consistently see a 1708 MHZ speed in MSI afterburner. If these cards (after the latest driver update) can do over 2000 MHZ on air I could see a 2300+ MHZ clock. This would potentially put the Vega 7 at the same level as a 2080TI,
Posted on Reply
#6
zo0lykas
looks really nice ! i like that wee R inside ;)

but price OMG :-) i remember when i was water cool r9 290 4 years ago block was 80 quid + 22 or 24 for backplate
Posted on Reply
#7
looncraz
kapone32 said:
It will be very interesting to see how a 7nm card handles water cooling. I used a water block on my Vega 64 and even though I have not overclocked it I consistently see a 1708 MHZ speed in MSI afterburner. If these cards (after the latest driver update) can do over 2000 MHZ on air I could see a 2300+ MHZ clock. This would potentially put the Vega 7 at the same level as a 2080TI,
My water-cooled Radeon VII, with stock settings, routinely hits near 1900MHz and sometimes peaks well above that - to nearly 2000MHz.

It overclocks to 2200MHz rather easily, but requires more than 1.3V to be stable. Hot spot hits 80C at those settings and the +20% power limit is insufficient to keep it fed so it backs down pretty readily.

And I have a pretty bad sample - 1146mv stock voltage. Many people are reporting stock voltage under 1050mv and can hit 2200MHz at 1200mv or under, which is perfectly safe (max safe is about 1220mv - where I can only hit 2075MHz).

Basically.. Radeon VII loves water-cooling!
Posted on Reply
#8
kapone32
looncraz said:
My water-cooled Radeon VII, with stock settings, routinely hits near 1900MHz and sometimes peaks well above that - to nearly 2000MHz.

It overclocks to 2200MHz rather easily, but requires more than 1.3V to be stable. Hot spot hits 80C at those settings and the +20% power limit is insufficient to keep it fed so it backs down pretty readily.

And I have a pretty bad sample - 1146mv stock voltage. Many people are reporting stock voltage under 1050mv and can hit 2200MHz at 1200mv or under, which is perfectly safe (max safe is about 1220mv - where I can only hit 2075MHz).

Basically.. Radeon VII loves water-cooling!
It might be a dumb question but have you updated to the latest drivers? Apparently there were updates in there to let the cards run even higher with stock voltage.
Posted on Reply
#9
moproblems99
I will buy TPU a waterblock to do the tests with if they return it with a VII attached to it :peace:
Posted on Reply
#10
yakk
That is pretty brutal pricing. Want single slot goodness, but ouch...
Posted on Reply
#11
the54thvoid
kapone32 said:
It will be very interesting to see how a 7nm card handles water cooling. I used a water block on my Vega 64 and even though I have not overclocked it I consistently see a 1708 MHZ speed in MSI afterburner. If these cards (after the latest driver update) can do over 2000 MHZ on air I could see a 2300+ MHZ clock. This would potentially put the Vega 7 at the same level as a 2080TI,
I'm not peeing on your party, really, I'm not but my 2080ti, on air, runs about 2000MHz.

Gamers Nexus did some good tests (here). It's troubling though how hot it gets under water when the volts are ramped up. I'd be wary about longtime OC's like that.

I still think water cooling is best suited to quieter operations, instead of higher performance. That's why I gave up on WC and went for a decent air-cooled card.
Posted on Reply
#12
chapstickbomber
looncraz said:
And I have a pretty bad sample - 1146mv stock voltage. Many people are reporting stock voltage under 1050mv and can hit 2200MHz at 1200mv or under, which is perfectly safe (max safe is about 1220mv - where I can only hit 2075MHz).

Basically.. Radeon VII loves water-cooling!
Can confirm. Mine has a stock voltage of 1034mV. It will take 1950 as the peak clock (1900 avg) for 1000mV. 1200mV will do 2200 peak (2150 avg). I never got behavior this sexy from the stock cooler. Not even close. Temp moves the clock/voltage curve upward more on 7nm than 12/14/16nm FinFET, it looks like.
Posted on Reply
#13
turbogear
As always for EKWB this looks great.
I have been using EKWB blocks on few generations of GPUs.
Vega 64 nickel block was really great. The performance was supper. My Vega never got hotter than 42°C.

Unfortunately the price has gone up since then. :cry:
Vega EKWB nickel plexi block cost me 117€ for block and 29€ for backplate. It was without RGB lighting.
Now similar combination will cost 187€.

I think I will keep my pre-order on Alphacool Eisblock GPX-A Plexi. That costs 127€ including backplate.
What I am not sure of is if it will perform as good as EKWB. I never used Alphacool before. :ohwell:

https://www.aquatuning.de/water-cooling/gpu-water-blocks/gpu-full-cover/eisblock-gpx/24452/alphacool-eisblock-gpx-a-plexi-light-amd-radeon-vii-mit-backplate
Posted on Reply
#14
looncraz
kapone32 said:
It might be a dumb question but have you updated to the latest drivers? Apparently there were updates in there to let the cards run even higher with stock voltage.
Running 19.3.2, ATM, which was the driver that improved stability at a set voltage (my guess is that it actually just smoothed out the voltage drop when dropping frequency - slowing how quickly the card would drop voltage, thus allowing stability to be better).
Posted on Reply
#15
turbogear
chapstickbomber said:
Can confirm. Mine has a stock voltage of 1034mV. It will take 1950 as the peak clock (1900 avg) for 1000mV. 1200mV will do 2200 peak (2150 avg). I never got behavior this sexy from the stock cooler. Not even close. Temp moves the clock/voltage curve upward more on 7nm than 12/14/16nm FinFET, it looks like.
Wow I think you got a great card. Mine has default voltage of 1084mV.
Posted on Reply
#16
Mescalamba
turbogear said:
As always for EKWB this looks great.
I have been using EKWB blocks on few generations of GPUs.
Vega 64 nickel block was really great. The performance was supper. My Vega never got hotter than 42°C.

Unfortunately the price has gone up since then. :cry:
Vega EKWB nickel plexi block cost me 117€ for block and 29€ for backplate. It was without RGB lighting.
Now similar combination will cost 187€.

I think I will keep my pre-order on Alphacool Eisblock GPX-A Plexi. That costs 127€ including backplate.
What I am not sure of is if it will perform as good as EKWB. I never used Alphacool before. :ohwell:

https://www.aquatuning.de/water-cooling/gpu-water-blocks/gpu-full-cover/eisblock-gpx/24452/alphacool-eisblock-gpx-a-plexi-light-amd-radeon-vii-mit-backplate
Performance unsure. But it will last probably lifetime. :D
Posted on Reply
#17
John Naylor
I love EK's stuff but I'm now hating their site .... the configurator has become cumbersome and answering user questions about their aluminum and copper AIOs has become a nightmare as the modules are not well identified and they keep changing their names.
Posted on Reply
#18
turbogear
looncraz said:
My water-cooled Radeon VII, with stock settings, routinely hits near 1900MHz and sometimes peaks well above that - to nearly 2000MHz.

It overclocks to 2200MHz rather easily, but requires more than 1.3V to be stable. Hot spot hits 80C at those settings and the +20% power limit is insufficient to keep it fed so it backs down pretty readily.

And I have a pretty bad sample - 1146mv stock voltage. Many people are reporting stock voltage under 1050mv and can hit 2200MHz at 1200mv or under, which is perfectly safe (max safe is about 1220mv - where I can only hit 2075MHz).

Basically.. Radeon VII loves water-cooling!
Which waterblock are you using on your Radeon VII?
Is it Bykski?
That is the only one that I know about is available at the moment.
Alphacool and EKWB will become available from start of April.
Posted on Reply
#20
EKJake
EKWB Rep
EK is doing the Classic Line, so at one point a cheaper Radeon block should emerge with less design features and simpler RGB implementation.

John Naylor said:
I love EK's stuff but I'm now hating their site .... the configurator has become cumbersome and answering user questions about their aluminum and copper AIOs has become a nightmare as the modules are not well identified and they keep changing their names.
What issues are you having with the configurator and what confusion with the names? I'm happy to pass along feedback! :)
Posted on Reply
#21
looncraz
turbogear said:
Which waterblock are you using on your Radeon VII?
Is it Bykski?
That is the only one that I know about is available at the moment.
Alphacool and EKWB will become available from start of April.
I am using the Bykski block. I believe I got the first one.
Posted on Reply
#22
turbogear
looncraz said:
I am using the Bykski block. I believe I got the first one.
Thanks for info.
What are your temperatures like during gaming at default setting?

I am still not 100% sure if I keep pre-order of Alphacool or go for EKWB.
I had always very good experince with EKWB components.
A large part of my water loop is made of EKWB components. :D
Recently replaced all Noctua fans with Vardars on the Rads.
Posted on Reply
#23
looncraz
turbogear said:
Thanks for info.
What are your temperatures like during gaming at default setting?

I am still not 100% sure if I keep pre-order of Alphacool or go for EKWB.
I had always very good experince with EKWB components.
A large part of my water loop is made of EKWB components. :D
Recently replaced all Noctua fans with Vardars on the Rads.
I hit about 45C on the GPU and about 60C on the junction... probably need to reapply the TIM.
Posted on Reply
#24
turbogear
looncraz said:
I hit about 45C on the GPU and about 60C on the junction... probably need to reapply the TIM.
Compairing to air cooling, that's great result.
I am running mine at 1035mV @1802MHz on air and junction temperature hit 100°C during gaming.
My default voltage was 1082mV.

I will use Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut for TIM when I move to water cooling.
Posted on Reply
#25
skline00
looncraz, thank you for the information. I also ordered the Bykski Rad VII waterblock and it shipped yesterday from Boise, Idaho. Tentatively supposed to be delivered Monday. I'll post my results after I get it.

BTW, what thermal paste did you use?

I had ordered Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut to use with it due to the slight variance between the cpu and HBM2 heighths.

Did you have any problem with that?

looncraz said:
I am using the Bykski block. I believe I got the first one.
LUCKEE!:laugh:
Posted on Reply
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