News Posts matching #Radeon VII

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Control Can Use Up to 18.5GB of Video Memory

"Control" by Remedy is the season's hottest AAA release, not just because it's an above-average story-driven action RPG, but also because it's an eye candy-shop. With the ability to use NVIDIA RTX real-time raytracing across a multitude of features, the game is particularly heavy on graphics hardware. Tweaktown tested the game's stability at extremely high display resolutions, including 8K, and found that the game can use up to 18.5 GB of video memory, when running in DirectX 12 with RTX enabled. There's only one client-segment graphics card capable of that much memory, the $2,499 NVIDIA TITAN RTX, which ships with 24 GB of GDDR6 memory. Its nearest client-segment neighbor is the AMD Radeon VII, but it only packs 16 GB of HBM2.

When a game needs more video memory than your graphics card has, Windows has an elaborate memory management system that sheds some of that memory onto your system's main memory, and the swap file progressively (at reduced performance, of course). Video memory usage drops like a rock between 8K and 4K UHD (which is 1/4th the pixels as 8K). With all RTX features enabled and other settings maxed out, "Control" only uses 8.1 GB of video memory. What this also means is that video cards with just 8 GB of memory are beginning fall short of what it takes to game at 4K. The $699 GeForce RTX 2080 Super only has 8 GB. The RTX 2080 Ti, with its 11 GB of memory has plenty of headroom and muscle. Find other interesting observations in the source link below.

The Coalition's Gears 5 Is Filled to the Brim With AMD DNA, System Requirements Outed

Gears 5, the next upcoming installment in the Gears of War series of video games, is launching this September 10th. In anticipation, developer The Coalition has announced the games' close partnership development with AMD, optimizing it for the company's cadre of GPU and CPU solutions. The game will make extensive use of Asynchronous Compute - one of AMD's most relevant technologies in gaining the upper hand against NVIDIA on performance terms. According to the developer, post-processing effects are being run exclusively on Asynchronous Compute, which means that the games' rendering is being run as close to a clockwork as possible. FidelityFX also makes an appearance again, as one of the latest AMD technologies for improving visual fidelity and sharpness. Multithreaded Command Buffering is the technical implementation for a system that improves AMD's Ryzen CPUs' processing of the game, specifically geared towards taking advantage of that CPU architecture's strong points.

The game seems to be a pretty scalable affair, with minimum requirements making do with just 2 GB of VRAM and an AMD RX 560 or NVIDIA GTX 1050. The ideal system requirements, however, call for a much beefier setup, with an AMD Radeon VII or NVIDIA RTX 2080 being called for, including 16 GB of system memory and a whopping 100 GB+ install footprint - preferably on an SSD. The game, like Gears of War 4, has been developed with the PC market in mind - there are more than 35 different graphical options for users to tweak. Here's hoping the games' writing is as much a technical achievement as its engine development seems to be.

AMD Releases Radeon Software Adrenalin 19.7.3

AMD today posted the latest version of Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition. Version 19.7.3 beta comes in the nick of time with optimization for "Wolfenstein: Youngblood," with up to 13 percent higher frame-rates on offer compared to 19.7.2. The release also adds Radeon GPU Profiler and Microsoft PIX for Radeon RX 5700 series. AMD also expanded its Vulkan API support by adding six new extensions, two of which are AMD-exclusive, and four standard. These include VK_EXT_display_surface_counter, VK_AMD_pipeline_compiler_control, VK_AMD_shader_core_properties2, VK_EXT_subgroup_size_control, VK_KHR_imageless_framebuffer, and VK_KHR_variable_pointers.

Among the fixed issues are "League of Legends" failing to launch with RX 5700-series on Windows 7; RX 5700 series experiencing application crashes with DirectX 9 applications after an Express Upgrade, Windows Mixed Reality not launching with Radeon Image Sharpening enabled on RX 5700-series; out-of-sync audio with ReLive VR; incorrect Radeon Wattman power gauge values for Radeon VII; AMD Log Utility not correctly installing; performance drops with Radeon Anti-Lag; minor stutter noticed in the first few minutes of "Fotnite" gameplay on RX 5700-series; Radeon Overlay flickering over Vulkan apps with Image Sharpening enabled; and some corruption noticed when running Adobe Premier Pro 2019 benchmarks. Grab the driver from the link below.
DOWNLOADS: AMD Radeon Software Adrenalin 19.7.3

The change-log follows.

AMD Retires the Radeon VII Less Than Five Months Into Launch

AMD has reportedly discontinued production of its flagship Radeon VII graphics card. According to a Cowcotland report, AMD no longer finds it viable to produce and sell the Radeon VII at prices competitive to NVIDIA's RTX 2080, especially when its latest Radeon RX 5700 XT performs within 5-12 percent of the Radeon VII at less than half its price. AMD probably expects custom-design RX 5700 XT cards to narrow the gap even more. The RX 5700 XT has a much lesser BOM (bill of materials) cost compared to the Radeon VII, due to the simplicity of its ASIC, a conventional GDDR6 memory setup, and far lighter electrical requirements.

In stark contrast to the RX 5700 XT, the Radeon VII is based on a complex MCM (multi-chip module) that has not just a 7 nm GPU die, but also four 32 Gbit HBM2 stacks, and a silicon interposer. It also has much steeper VRM requirements. Making matters worse is the now-obsolete "Vega" architecture it's based on, which loses big time against "Navi" at performance/Watt. The future of AMD's high-end VGA lineup is uncertain. Looking at the way "Navi" comes close to performance/Watt parity with NVIDIA on the RX 5700, AMD may be tempted to design a larger GPU die based on "Navi," with a conventional GDDR6-based memory sub-system, to take another swing at NVIDIA's high-end.

Bitspower Intros 15mm-thick Full-Coverage Water Block for Radeon VII

Bitspower formally launched its Brizo BR-VGRVIIRD full-coverage water block for the AMD Radeon VII graphics card. The block combines a nickel-plated copper primary material with a clear acrylic top that has brushed metal embellishment with laser-etched Bitspower and Radeon VII logos. The top has a factory-fitted addressable-RGB LED setup that plugs in direct to a 3-pin aRGB header. The block features a large micro-fin lattice that covers all chiplets on the "Vega 20" MCM, the 7 nm GPU die, and the four HBM2 stacks. The block is single-slot capable, measuring 266.2 mm x 136 mm x 15.22 mm (WxDxH). It features standard G1/4" threads for up to four fittings (multi-GPU capable). The company didn't reveal pricing.

Phanteks Announces Glacier Radeon VII Full-coverage Water Block

Phanteks today announces its first AMD waterblock designed specifically for the AMD Radeon VII graphic card. Engineered to deliver high cooling performance, the Glacier Radeon VII is the latest addition to the Glacier Series. Like all our Glacier Series products, the waterblock comes with anodized or chrome plated cover plates, polished acrylic surface, and a high-quality nickel finish copper base. The water block features minimalist design that covers the entire PCB and is compatible with the original Radeon VII backplate to highlight your hardware.

The integrated Digital-RGB lighting illuminates the whole waterblock evenly and can be synced with other D-RGB products and motherboards. The full cover waterblock directly cools the GPU, RAM and VRM efficiently thanks to the optimized high flow routing design. This ensures optimal performance and cooling to keep the GPU stable even at high clock speeds or massive workloads.

Bitspower at COMPUTEX 2019: New CPU, GPU Blocks and Conceptual Products

Bitspower at COMPUTEX 2019 showcased new products and conceptual, advanced looks at products that are still being developed. The company showcased GPU waterblocks for both the NVIDIA RTX 20-series of graphics cards, as well as AMD's current top of the line Radeon VII. On the GPU waterblock side of things, they also showcased an in-development block with a rugged texture and design that carries Bitspower's logo, which would certainly look great on a vertically-mounted GPU.

TechPowerUp Releases GPU-Z v2.21.0

TechPowerUp GPU-Z is a handy graphics subsystem information, diagnostic, and monitoring utility no enthusiast can leave home without, and today we bring you its latest version. The new TechPowerUp GPU-Z v2.21.0 adds support for NVIDIA Quadro P500. More importantly, it fixes sensor data readouts being broken for the Radeon VII with Radeon Software 19.5.1 (or later) installed. A broken GPU load sensor for AMD "Raven Ridge" APUs has also been fixed. Lastly, OpenCL support detection has been added for Radeon VII and other graphics cards based on the "Vega 20" MCM. Grab it from the link below.
DOWNLOAD: TechPowerUp GPU-Z

The change-log follows.

AMD Releases Radeon Software Adrenalin 19.5.2 Beta

AMD today posted its latest version of the Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition. Version 19.5.2, signifying the second release for the month of May 2019, comes with release-date optimization for "Total War : Three Kingdoms." Among the issues fixed are multi-display screen flickering problems noticed on Radeon VII, incorrect maximum temperature values reported by Radeon WattMan for certain GPUs, GPU Utilization showing up for unsupported products on Radeon Performance Metrics Overlay; and HDR video freezing or experiencing corruption on certain Ryzen APUs. Grab the drivers from the link below.

DOWNLOAD: AMD Radeon Software Adrenalin 19.5.2 beta

The change-log follows.

Windows 10 May 2019 Update 1903 Gaming Performance Tested in 21 Titles, with RTX 2080 Ti and Radeon VII

Microsoft earlier today released to market its latest version of Windows 10, the May 2019 Update (version 1903). There was quite some talk about Microsoft tweaking the kernel to improve CPU performance. Other gamer-relevant changes include updates to WDDM (display driver model), and an updated DirectX 12, which now supports variable-rate shading. A similar technology is available on Vulkan, and has already been implemented in games such as "Wolfenstein: The New Colossus." With much talk about the latest Windows being better for games than the previous Windows 10 Fall 2018 Update (1809), we decided to take it for a spin.

After backing-up our 1809 installation onto a disk image, we updated to 1903 using Windows Update, with the same driver- and game versions as our recently-updated setup (details here). We then put the machine through our entire selection of 21 games, and two high-end graphics cards, the AMD Radeon VII and the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti. We used driver versions 19.5.1 for AMD, and 430.64 for NVIDIA, both of which support Windows 1903. Our tests span 1920x1080 (Full HD), 2560x1440 (1440p), and 3840x2160 pixels (4K) resolutions. We present our data as percentage gain/loss over Windows 1809, with three data-points per game, each representing the three resolutions in the order "Full HD", "1440p", and "4K". The first graph below covers the RTX 2080 Ti, and the second one Radeon VII.

Sapphire Reps Leak Juicy Details on AMD Radeon Navi

A Sapphire product manager and PR director, speaking to the Chinese press spilled the beans on AMD's upcoming Radeon Navi graphics card lineup. It looks like with Navi, AMD is targeting the meat of the serious gamer market, at two specific price points, USD $399 with a "Pro" (cut-down) product, and $499 with an "XT" (fully-fledged) product. AMD has two NVIDIA products in its crosshairs, the GeForce RTX 2070, and the RTX 2060. In the interview, the Sapphire rep mentioned "stronger than 2070", when talking about performance numbers, which we assume is for the Navi XT variant - definitely promising. The $399 Navi "Pro" is probably being designed with a performance target somewhere between the RTX 2060 and RTX 2070, so you typically pay $50 more than you would for an RTX 2060, for noticeably higher performance.

Sapphire also confirmed that AMD's Navi does not have specialized ray-tracing hardware on the silicon, but such technology will debut with "next year's new architecture". They also suggested that AMD is unlikely to scale up Navi for the enthusiast segment, and that the Vega-based Radeon VII will continue to be the company's flagship product. On the topic of Radeon VII custom designs, Sapphire commented that "there is no plans for that". On the other hand, Sapphire is actively working on custom designs for the Navi architecture, and mentioned that "work on a "Toxic" version of Navi is complete, and it is watercooled". Many people have speculated that AMD will unveil Navi at its Computex keynote address on May 27. Sapphire confirmed that date, and also added that the launch will be on 7th of July, 2019.

AMD Releases Radeon Software Adrenalin 19.5.1 Drivers

Just in time for the release of Bethesda's open-world first-person shooter Rage 2 (find our performance analysis here), AMD has released their latest installment of the Radeon Adrenalin 2019 edition drivers for their graphics cards to make the most of the game. Indeed, AMD claims an improvement in game performance of up to 16% on the Radeon VII relative to last month's 19.4.3 drivers, and this is in addition to added support for the big Windows 10 May 2019 update and instruction tracing for AMD's GPU Profiler version 1.5.X. There is a plethora of fixed issues listed as well, and the usual list of known bugs, all of which can be seen past the break. We have also hosted the drivers installer for your convenience, which can be found at the link below.
DOWNLOAD: AMD Radeon Software Adrenalin 19.5.1

AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 50th Anniversary Edition (Gold Edition) Isn't Just a Fancy Box

Canada Computers put out details of Ryzen 7 2700X 50th Anniversary Edition, officially known as the Ryzen 7 2700X Gold Edition, a commemorative SKU of the 2700X which has been pictured in our older story. At the time we reported that the new SKU commands a roughly $50 premium over the regular 2700X with a fancy new box design and a facsimile of AMD CEO Lisa Su's signature on the processor's IHS. Turns out, you get a whole lot more.

The Ryzen 7 2700X 50th Anniversary Edition includes not just the processor and a Wraith Prism RGB cooling solution, but also two AAA games: Tom Clancy's "The Division 2" Gold Edition, and "World War Z," a black cotton T-shirt with AMD 50 artwork on both sides, and a special case-badge with another signature of the CEO, besides the Ryzen 7 case-badge. The 2 Free Games offer is being extended to the entire Ryzen 2000 AM4 desktop processor family, and several Radeon GPU models, including Radeon VII, RX 500 series, and RX Vega series. The offer is subject to retailer participation.

AMD Readying Commemorative 50th Anniversary Editions of Radeon VII, Ryzen 7 2700X

AMD is going to celebrate their 50th anniversary in a big way, with commemorative editions of both its highest performance GPU and CPU in the form of the Radeon VII and Ryzen 7 2700X, respectively. This isn't so surprising - after all, if partners are readying their own special editions, it would be amiss for the red team not to do the same. It's a time to lavish their lineup with something that marks the fifty years of the company's existence - alongside its bright (and not so bright) spots.

The Radeon VII will apparently bring the red up to 11, with a red-colored shroud and LED lighting - and apart from that, we simply don't know. It's speculated the Ryzen 7 2700X will be packaged in a prettier box, with increased core clocks to boot - perhaps through core binning and a higher maximum boost threshold. It would make sense for AMD to do the same on their own Radeon VII - celebrating a 50th anniversary with increased performance across the board seems an easy conclusion to come to. We'll just have to wait a few more days, though - apparently, the company will be introducing these products next week, come April 29th. If you want a piece of AMD's history, this could be your chance - albeit a limited one when it comes to actual production numbers for these limited edition GPU and CPU.

AMD Releases Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition 19.4.1 Drivers

AMD today released their Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition 19.4.1 Drivers. This beta release features no performance enhancements, and it also doesn't add any support for new games. Instead, it is centered around fixing various issues seen within AMD's software and a couple of games. The biggest of these fixes is the elimination of crashes and application hang in World of Warcraft with Patch 8.1.5 or later when using MSAA. They have also eliminated graphical corruption seen in World of Tanks when in-game settings are set to the minimum when using Radeon RX Vega graphics products. Considering how popular both of these titles are it is likely more than a few gamers will be quite happy with these fixes. AMD has made sure to note a few unresolved problems as well. The most annoying of which is likely going to be screen flicker with multiple displays at the desktop or with applications running on AMD's Radeon VII.
DOWNLOAD: AMD Radeon Adrenalin Edition 19.4.1 Beta
The change-log follows.

EK Water Blocks Releases EK-Vector Series Water Blocks for AMD Radeon VII

EK Water Blocks, the leading premium computer liquid cooling gear manufacturer, is releasing EK-Vector Radeon VII water blocks that are compatible with reference design AMD Radeon VII graphics cards. This kind of efficient cooling will allow your high-end graphics card to reach higher boost clocks, thus providing more overclocking headroom and more performance during gaming or other GPU intense tasks.

This water block directly cools the GPU, 16GB of HBM2 memory, and VRM (voltage regulation module) as cooling liquid is channeled directly over these critical areas. These newly developed water blocks feature a redesigned cooling engine that has a larger footprint compared to the previous generation of EK Full Cover water blocks. This results in a larger surface area for heat transfer which increases the thermal performance of these water blocks.

AMD Releases Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition 19.3.3 Drivers

AMD today released the latest version of their Radeon Adrenalin 2019 Drivers with beta version 19.3.3. This release adds support for Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice and Generation Zero. In regards to performance improvements AMD made no mention of any with this release; however, a few fixes were implemented. Up first is Rainbow Six Siege which should no longer have texture flickering or intermittent corruption issues. Meanwhile, in DOTA 2 VR AMD has managed to eliminate stutter problems on HMD devices when the game is utilizing the Vulkan API. They also made mention of two known issues as well. The first issue impacts AMD Ryzen mobile processors with Radeon Vega Graphics, on which the mouse cursor can disappear or go beyond the top boundary of a display. While the second problem pertains to WattMan gauges along with the performance metrics, overlay being inaccurate on systems with an AMD Radeon VII installed.
DOWNLOAD: AMD Radeon Adrenalin Edition 19.3.3 Beta

AMD Releases Radeon Adrenalin Edition 19.3.2 Drivers - Offers New Vulkan Extensions

AMD has released the latest version of their Radeon Adrenalin 2019 Drivers. Beta version 19.3.2 is a significant update as it delivers support for Tom Clancy's The Division 2 and Sid Meier's Civilization VI: Gathering Storm. AMD also claims up to 4% gain in regards to average performance on the Radeon VII when compared to the previously released 19.2.3 drivers. To go with the added game support and performance boost this release also supports DirectX 12 on Windows 7 for select titles. The Vulkan API also gets some love with this release with the addition of various extensions with the most notable one being the VK_EXT_depth_clip_enable extension which allows for depth clipping operations to be controlled by the application rather than the driver thus making it useful for Developers translating Direct3D content to the Vulkan API. For the full details for this release, you can check the changelog after the break.
DOWNLOAD: AMD Radeon Adrenalin Edition 19.3.2 Beta

Alphacool Announces Presale for Eisblock Plexi Light for Radeon VII

The dream of addressable Digital RGB
The Eisblock GPX Plexi Light cooler comes from Alphacool's high-end series and perfectly reflects Alphacool's philosophy. High performance, outstanding aesthetics, and the latest technology are all bundled together to create a fantastic cooler.

The Alphacool Plexi Light graphic cards water cooler is characterized by several design features. The clear Plexiglas allows you to see the water flow. The cooling block is made of solid copper, and is then completely nickel-plated. The generous water flow covers all important components of the graphics card. Not only the GPU, but also the voltage converters, the V-Ram and other components that generate heat are actively cooled with water.

Bykski Rolls Out Radeon VII Full-coverage Water-block with RGB LED Lighting

Chinese liquid cooling major Bykski rolled out one of the first full-coverage water-blocks for AMD Radeon VII, the Bykski A-Radeon VII-X. This block uses nickel-plated copper as its main material, with a clear-acrylic top. The metal part doesn't span the entire length of the block, since AMD has concentrated all heat on the Radeon VII through its multi-chip module approach, and hot VRM components surrounding the MCM in close proximity. The acrylic top spans the entire length of the reference PCB for cosmetic reasons. The top is studded with nine addressable RGB diodes that take in a standardized 3-pin aRGB header input. The block supports standard G 1/4" fittings. The company didn't reveal pricing.

TechPowerUp Releases GPU-Z v2.17.0

TechPowerUp today released the latest version of TechPowerUp GPU-Z, the graphics subsystem information, monitoring, and diagnostic utility no enthusiast can leave home without. Version 2.17.0 adds support for new GPUs, and fixes a number of issues. To begin with, GPU-Z adds support for AMD Radeon VII, NVIDIA TITAN RTX, GeForce GTX 1660 Ti, GeForce RTX 20-series Mobile, Quadro RTX 4000, Intel "Amber Lake" GT2 graphics, among several other rare GPU models detailed in the change-log. Support is also added for AMD Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition drivers.

Among the several issues fixed are improved monitoring on Radeon RX 580 2048-SP, default boost frequency reporting on GTX 1660 Ti and certain "Pascal" GPUs, missing fan sensors on RTX 20-series cards with no display connected, a start-up crash and DXVA 2.0 report crash noticed on Windows XP machines; power-limit reporting and BIOS extraction crashes on certain older NVIDIA GPUs, various general crashes caused by physical memory access, and video memory reporting on "Vega" based graphics cards with 16 GB memory. There are numerous user-experience improvements, including simplified sensor labels, improved memory usage readouts, a more functional crash-reporter that lets you describe the problem along with an e-mail address input so we could directly get back to you; memory timings readouts only appearing in compatible environments, etc. Grab GPU-Z from the link below.
DOWNLOAD: TechPowerUp GPU-Z v2.17.0

The complete change-log follows.

AMD Speeds up Ryzen APU Support with Radeon 19.2.3 Drivers

AMD today released their latest Radeon Software Adrenaline 2019 Edition drivers. This latest beta, version 19.2.3, brings with it support for AMD Ryzen mobile processors with Vega graphics which see up to a 10% performance boost on average versus the 17.40 launch drivers. Titles included in the performance testing were; Destiny 2, Shadow of War, Rise of the Tomb Raider, Civilization 6, and the Witcher 3. Furthermore, various eSports title have seen performance gains of up to 17%, again when compared to the older 17.40 launch drivers. The games AMD used for testing were; Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, Fortnite, Player Unknown's Battleground, and World of Warcraft. The only other performance gains specifically mentioned in this driver release is a 3% boost in Dirt Rally 2 on the Radeon RX Vega 64.

AMD has fixed a few issues with this release as well including player character outlines being stuck on screen after being revived in Battlefield V being the most significant fix. Otherwise, all other fixes or changes are related to AMD software or features such as ReLive wireless VR, FreeSync, and fan tuning. That said, a few prominent issues remain some of which have been around for some time like mouse lag on multi-monitor systems when one display is turned off. Other problems include Radeon WattMan not applying settings changes on the AMD Radeon VII. Meanwhile, the performance metrics overlay may fluctuate giving inaccurate readings on the previously mentioned Radeon VII. For full details, you can check the changelog after the break.
DOWNLOAD: AMD Radeon Software Adrenalin 19.2.3

AMD Radeon VII Retested With Latest Drivers

Just two weeks ago, AMD released their Radeon VII flagship graphics card. It is based on the new Vega 20 GPU, which is the world's first graphics processor built using a 7 nanometer production process. Priced at $699, the new card offers performance levels 20% higher than Radeon RX Vega 64, which should bring it much closer to NVIDIA's GeForce RTX 2080. In our testing we still saw a 14% performance deficit compared to RTX 2080. For the launch-day reviews AMD provided media outlets with a press driver dated January 22, 2019, which we used for our review.

Since the first reviews went up, people in online communities have been speculating that these were early drivers and that new drivers will significantly boost the performance of Radeon VII, to make up lost ground over RTX 2080. There's also the mythical "fine wine" phenomenon where performance of Radeon GPUs significantly improve over time, incrementally. We've put these theories to the test by retesting Radeon VII using AMD's latest Adrenalin 2019 19.2.2 drivers, using our full suite of graphics card benchmarks.

Modding a 2x 140 mm All-in-One CPU Watercooler onto the AMD Radeon VII

Reddit user CarbonFireOC wasn't happy with the temperatures he's been seeing on his Radeon VII, and decided he wanted watercooling. Unfortunately, that early since product release no GPU waterblocks are available for the Radeon VII. What he figured out was that the waterblock of EVGA's CLC 280 all-in-one cooler will fit. This cooler, which is made by Asetek and licensed by EVGA is designed for Intel & AMD motherboards and many similar variants exist from vendors like Fractal Design, NZXT and others.

While performing such a mod on a $700 graphics card is not for the faint-hearted, it shows that with a little bit of creative ingenuity you can achieve amazing results without wasting top dollar.

His 24/7 stable settings on Radeon VII are 2122 MHz core, 1265 mV, and 1252 MHz memory, resulting in a 3DMark Firestrike graphics score of around 33,000. Even at such a high voltage, the watercooling keeps temperatures very low at 40°C GPU, 60°C Hotspot.

AMD Releases Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition 19.2.2 Beta Drivers

AMD today made available the latest version of their Radeon software drivers, Adrenalin Edition 19.2.2, for supported graphics solutions. This brings with it support for the recently released Radeon VII graphics card, in addition to equally new and upcoming game titles including Metro Exodus, Far Cry New Dawn, the Civ VI: Gathering Storm expansion, and Crackdown 3. More pleasing to many users no doubt will be the large list of fixed issues, including a timely Alt + Tab shortcut on a DisplayPort monitor and plenty of bug fixes related to Radeon Wattman as it pertains to the Radeon VII. The drivers are up for download at the link below, hosted directly on TechPowerUp for your convenience, and the full change log is available past the break for those interested.

DOWNLOAD: AMD Radeon Software Adrenalin 19.2.2
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