Tuesday, April 16th 2019

EK Unveils Momentum CPU+VRM Monoblock for ASUS Maximus XI Extreme

EK Water Blocks, premium computer liquid cooling gear manufacturer from Europe, is releasing a new Intel LGA1151 socket based monoblock from the Quantum Line. The EK-Momentum Maximus XI Extreme is tailor-made for the ROG Maximus XI Extreme motherboard. The monoblock is equipped with a 3-pin D-RGB LED strip and it offers unparallel aesthetical customization alongside superior performance with VRM cooling. The RGB LED in the monoblock is compatible with ASUS AURA RGB control, thus offering a full lighting customization experience for every single diode separately.

This is a complete all-in-one (CPU and motherboard) liquid cooling solution for motherboards that supports the 8th and 9th generation of Intel Core processors. It is compatible with the ASUS ROG Maximus XI Extreme Z390 motherboard. Designed and engineered in cooperation with ASUS , this monoblock uses the latest generation of EK cooling engine used on the Quantum lineup to ensure the best possible CPU cooling while not reducing flow to other components. This water block directly cools the LGA1151 socket type CPU, as well as the voltage regulation (MOSFET) module.
Liquid flows directly over all critical areas, providing the enthusiasts with a great solution for high and stable overclocks. Like with every EK monoblock, EK-Momentum ROG Maximus XI Extreme D-RGB features high flow design and it can be easily used with the system using a weaker water pump or lower pump speed settings as well. The Momentum monoblock also comes with sophisticated D-RGB (addressable) lightning which connects to a standard 3-pin 5V D-RGB header.

This Z390 monoblock also comes with a special cold plate which ensures that the monoblock has better mechanical contact with the IHS of 8th and 9th gen Intel 1151 socket based processors, thus enabling better thermal transfer. The base of the monoblock is made of nickel-plated electrolytic copper while the top is made of quality acrylic glass material. The nickel plated brass screw-in standoffs are pre-installed and allow for easy installation.

A Digital (addressable) 3-pin 5V D-RGB LED strip is installed in the monoblock that connects to the motherboard's 3-pin LED header or it can be connected to any other supported 5V 3-pin LED controller. This product is compatible with ASUS Aura RGB control software. The arrow marking on the 3-pin LED connector is to be aligned with the +5V marking on the RGB header.

Availability and Pricing
EK-Momentum ROG Maximus XI Extreme D-RGB - Plexi Monoblock is made in Slovenia, Europe and is readily available for purchase through the EK Webshop and Partner Reseller Network. It is priced at 141.90€, including VAT.
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8 Comments on EK Unveils Momentum CPU+VRM Monoblock for ASUS Maximus XI Extreme

#1
Vlada011
I don't like these transparent blocks... I like mine EK RVE10 RGB Monoblock and Heatkiller MB-X Kit for RVE.
But this block is best because have 3 active cooling component. CPU-VRM-PCH. My only have CPU and VRM.
And then it's better if Monoblock cover only CPU and VRM.




Monoblocks are expensive investment, not only because cost twice as CPU cooler, but because you can't use them few years for 2-3 computers as CPU Block.
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#2
Object55
Would like one for APEX, I doubt they will make it though.
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#3
Tsukiyomi91
super niche block for super niche motherboard.
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#4
bogami
Whether this CPU elment is designed to cool the processor with a removed thermal energy distributor ? Way then reduce the contact surface? It's true that many exaggerate with the thermal paste and this would somehow push the excess paste to the edges. Somehow I do not understand this interference in the field of contact. Way the lack of cooling chipsets? Everyone decided that 4 TPD is too small for additional liquid cooling for chipset and forget that they could cool all over M2 connections on motherboard with liquid and incrise preformance of loading . Complications, Price a.s.o. . The edging of the edges with r1mm is too much for today's CNC. This decline in flow is penalized. ignorance for the look, so 5 w will cover it ,more for the look! Only rocket fires are missing and everything will be cooler . Oh ,product is not Chinese ! This was naughty ,sory , hf .
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#5
Valantar
Vlada011, post: 4031234, member: 110294"
I don't like these transparent blocks... I like mine EK RVE10 RGB Monoblock and Heatkiller MB-X Kit for RVE.
But this block is best because have 3 active cooling component. CPU-VRM-PCH. My only have CPU and VRM.
And then it's better if Monoblock cover only CPU and VRM.




Monoblocks are expensive investment, not only because cost twice as CPU cooler, but because you can't use them few years for 2-3 computers as CPU Block.
There's no reason to watercool a modern PCH, no matter how much one might like to - they barely produce heat, and can be passively cooled with a moderately sized heatsink even with near-zero airflow.
bogami, post: 4031296, member: 102090"
Whether this CPU elment is designed to cool the processor with a removed thermal energy distributor ? Way then reduce the contact surface? It's true that many exaggerate with the thermal paste and this would somehow push the excess paste to the edges. Somehow I do not understand this interference in the field of contact. Way the lack of cooling chipsets? Everyone decided that 4 TPD is too small for additional liquid cooling for chipset and forget that they could cool all over M2 connections on motherboard with liquid and incrise preformance of loading . Complications, Price a.s.o. . The edging of the edges with r1mm is too much for today's CNC. This decline in flow is penalized. ignorance for the look, so 5 w will cover it ,more for the look! Only rocket fires are missing and everything will be cooler . Oh ,product is not Chinese ! This was naughty ,sory , hf .
What on earth are you trying to say here? What is a "removed thermal energy distributor"? A radiator? As for chipset cooling, as said above, it's utterly meaningless on modern chipsets. As is watercooling an m.2 drive - the thermal load for any but the most over-the-top server-like workload is nowhere near enough to require a complex water cooling setup. Most don't even need a heatsink as long as they have a modicum of airflow.
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#6
bogami
Valantar, post: 4031328, member: 171585"
There's no reason to watercool a modern PCH, no matter how much one might like to - they barely produce heat, and can be passively cooled with a moderately sized heatsink even with near-zero airflow.

What on earth are you trying to say here? What is a "removed thermal energy distributor"? A radiator? As for chipset cooling, as said above, it's utterly meaningless on modern chipsets. As is watercooling an m.2 drive - the thermal load for any but the most over-the-top server-like workload is nowhere near enough to require a complex water cooling setup. Most don't even need a heatsink as long as they have a modicum of airflow.
I'm sorry if this gogle translator is so poorly translating my thoughts.
that I do not understand where wisdom is in reducing the surface of the contact with the processor, that I did not remark for the first time and the answer was the same. Sufficient .for me - excuse ! Please forgive me for a poor translation. Chipsets do not encroach on the liquid cooling due to very low heating, and here they could extend cooling throughout the maderboard, including on M2 seats. I also mentioned poor attention to the edges, as friction could be reduced by processing them .
Posted on Reply
#7
Valantar
bogami, post: 4031377, member: 102090"
I'm sorry if this gogle translator is so poorly translating my thoughts.
that I do not understand where wisdom is in reducing the surface of the contact with the processor, that I did not remark for the first time and the answer was the same. Sufficient .for me - excuse ! Please forgive me for a poor translation. Chipsets do not encroach on the liquid cooling due to very low heating, and here they could extend cooling throughout the maderboard, including on M2 seats. I also mentioned poor attention to the edges, as friction could be reduced by processing them .
Ah, Google translate. That explains things. Indeed, it is translating your thoughts very poorly. If I understand you correctly you're asking why they don't expand "full-cover" blocks like these to cover more of the motherboard. There are multiple reasons for that. 1: no need - only the CPU and VRM produce enough heat to require water cooling. 2: cost. This is already an expensive product, and increasing the size would make it even more expensive. 3: complexity. The bigger and more complex the block, the higher the chance of leaks, and the more flow restriction it'll cause. Also, the bigger the area you want to cover on the motherboard, the more components
you have to make sure you're not colliding/interfering with.

If adding an extra SSD to your system required a full system teardown including removing the motherboard (as is required to remove a full-cover block as it mounts from the back), nobody would ever use this. Ever.

As for the round CPU contact pad, it's a bit weird. I'm guessing it has to do with mounting pressure, as monobloks often struggle with that.

Lastly I don't understand what you mean about rounding the edges for "friction" - the edges of the block don't touch anything. Why add more expensive CNC work if it doesn't do anything?
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#8
Vlada011
I know that PCH cooling is not necessary today.
Maybe situation is little hotter when people OC Cache and increase voltage for CPU on HEDT platform, but even than heatsink on good ASUS ROG boards is enough.
For Z390 even VRM is not so important, but on X299 example is recommended if you have watercooling to go with some option of VRM cooler.

I don't like Bitspower layout and mechanism for some Monoblock, with some rubbers and installing partially. Looks like more risky than EKWB. Example Bitspower Monoblock for RVE.
For me he is worse option then separate parts.
6 terminals with rubber than you put block over CPU VRM PCH blocks and connected them all with 6 rubbers and one plate 0.5mm above motherboard surface for nothing.
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