Thursday, May 16th 2019

Scythe Announces the Fuma 2 Dual Tower-type CPU Cooler

Scythe announces the release of new dual-towers cooler, Fuma 2, the successor of the Fuma family. With enlarged fins of heatsink and two Kaze Flex 120 mm fans, Fuma 2 increases 15 percent cooling efficiency compared to the first version. Asymmetrical design and cutout allow unlimited access to RMA module, and HPMS III mounting system guarantees convenient and secure installation as well as perfect contact pressure of most modern sockets and platform. The Scythe Fuma 2 is now available in North America at an MSRP of USD $59.95.
The specifications follow.

Scythe Fuma 2 CPU Cooler Product Specifications:
  • Model number: SCFM-2000
  • CPU Socket:
    o Intel LGA: 775/115X/1366/2011(V3)/2066
    o AMD: AM2(+)/AM3(+)/AM4/FM1/FM2(+)
  • Dimension: 137 mm x 131 mm x 154.5 mm (WxDxH)
  • Fan Size: 120 mm x 120 mm x 15 mm (Fan1), 120 mm x 120 mm x 25 mm(Fan2)
  • Fan Speed: 300~1200 RPM (Fan1), 300~1200 RPM (Fan2)
  • Air Flow: 8.28~33.86 CFM (Fan1), 16.6~51.17 CFM (Fan2)
  • Static Pressure: 0.23~0.9 mm H2O (Fan1), 0.0762~1.05 mm H2O (Fan2)
  • Noise: 2.7~23.9 dBA (Fan1), 4.0~24.9 dBA (Fan2)
  • Weight: 1.00 kg (with fan)
For more information, visit the product page.
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38 Comments on Scythe Announces the Fuma 2 Dual Tower-type CPU Cooler

#1
hat
Enthusiast
@John Naylor might like this, always recommending the Fuma to everybody...
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#2
Mats
One 15 mm fan, not really expected. Running in opposite directions?
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#3
Xzibit
Mats said:

One 15 mm fan, not really expected. Running in opposite directions?
Looks like its 15mm to clear the memory and it runs properly (Blades are switched to match the direction).
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#4
Mats
Yeah, I'm sure they're doing it right, it's just that I don't know if I've seen fans running in the other direction before on a heatsink.
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#5
ShurikN
It looks fairly beefy for a $60 cooler. Kudos to Scythe
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#6
SN2716057
If it works on aircraft it will work on cpu coolers...?

One disadvantage of contra-prop aircraft is that they are more noisier than one prop aircraft.
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#7
enxo218
concerned about getting holes in my mobo but it looks capable, will there be a performance review?
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#8
Valantar
SN2716057 said:

If it works on aircraft it will work on cpu coolers...?

One disadvantage of contra-prop aircraft is that they are more noisier than one prop aircraft.
That's because the propellers are right next to each other, creating extreme turbulence when the rearmost propeller cuts through the airflow path from the front one. This won't be an issue on a heatsink when there's a thick aluminium fin stack in between the two.
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#9
Caring1
Won't the differing airflows affect performance?
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#10
IceShroom
Caring1 said:

Won't the differing airflows affect performance?
We need to test it to see that.
Is TPU gonna review it?
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#11
delshay
That's interesting, I wonder if it's doing vortices with the reverse fan. It looks like it's trying to twist the air, allowing the air to be more attached to the surface of the radiator longer (stupid wild guess).
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#12
RH92
Valantar said:

That's because the propellers are right next to each other, creating extreme turbulence when the rearmost propeller cuts through the airflow path from the front one.
Also because the propeller tips are moving at supersonic speeds wich is obviously not the case with these fans !
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#13
bonehead123
Hopefully, they did their (eginering) homework on these & didn't just slap something together so they could say "look at us, we came out with something really cool & innovative"

Because to me it just looks like 2 Hyper 212 clone-joners back to back, hahaha :slap:
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#14
tigger
I'm the only one
I think there is a massive difference twixt a small contra fan setup and a contra airplane setup. Cooler looks good though, price aint bad either
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#15
asmotan
This cooler is already available in Japan and here is the review article tested with Core-i9 9900K.
http://www.gdm.or.jp/review/2019/0501/300092

With CPU temp of 9900K running stock with room temp at 20.4C, it was 33C at idle and 85C at heavy load.
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And with fan noise, it was 34.8dBA at idle and 38.6dBA at heavy load so this cooler isn't that noisy as some of you are concerned.
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They've also ran the test with 9900K OC'd to 5Ghz on all 8 cores and the following are the results.
[ATTACH type="full" alt="123092"]123092[/ATTACH]
[ATTACH type="full" alt="123093"]123093[/ATTACH]

As you can see, the temp is under 90C and the noise is under 40dBA even running at heavy load so this cooler is quite a beast IMO.
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#16
Caring1
Those test figures don't look that good to me, also:
Air Flow: 8.28~33.86 CFM (Fan1), 16.6~51.17 CFM (Fan2) means that Fan 1 is basically ineffectual and Fan 2 is sucking air through the first tower then blowing it through tower 2.
To be effective it needs twin 25mm fans with the same air flow (cfm).
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#17
Valantar
RH92 said:

Also because the propeller tips are moving at supersonic speeds wich is obviously not the case with these fans !
That probably has an effect, yeah :p I can't imagine a propeller hitting a turbulent airflow of that velocity at a 90-degree or higher angle to be a quiet affair. Quite the opposite.
Caring1 said:

Won't the differing airflows affect performance?
Why would they? Airflow is still in the same direction through the fin stack, after all. All this will do is break up the airflow, which can be beneficial both for flow and noise.
Caring1 said:

Those test figures don't look that good to me, also:
Air Flow: 8.28~33.86 CFM (Fan1), 16.6~51.17 CFM (Fan2) means that Fan 1 is basically ineffectual and Fan 2 is sucking air through the first tower then blowing it through tower 2.
To be effective it needs twin 25mm fans with the same air flow (cfm).
Not quite true: first off, those numbers are unobstructed, and with a design like this fan 2 is clearly obstructed more than fan 1, so it makes sense for it to be more powerful. Fan 2 even helps fan 1 overcome said resistance, while fan 2 only gets the same "help" in front, and not behind, which again makes it sensible for it to be more powerful. Second, the fin stack isn't crimped on the sides, meaning a strong middle fan will ensure that air doesn't escape out the sides but rather passes through the entire fin stack - improving thermals. Removing fan 1 would not have as large an effect as removing fan 2, obviously, but it will undoubtedly contribute to overcoming resistance in the fin stack and provide a more orderly airflow path.
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#18
John Naylor
hat said:

@John Naylor might like this, always recommending the Fuma to everybody...
So your position is that we should recommending products that cost more, make more noise and perform worse ? If you can show us something that performs better , makes less noise and costs less and I'll recommend that instead. For me, it's always gonna be about the numbers.

As to the lead post, I notice that no dimension is shown on the product page giving the dimension to the bottom of the heat sink. On their product page they show how it works with the ridiculously tall heat sinks that have no value or purpose, but what about sensible selections ? The image in the post above leaves it unclear if it would clear or why if that heat sink cut out is necessary.

When TPU does the review, I hope they include the original Fuma Rev B for comparison

bonehead123 said:

Because to me it just looks like 2 Hyper 212 clone-joners back to back, hahaha :slap:
The last Fuma topped the Hyper 212 by 11-12C in TPUs testing and the 212 was 23% louder. Interesting design ... the numbers will tell if it pans out
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#19
Mistral
Scythe is on of the companies that know well what they are doing, let's see the benchmarks!
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#20
Axaion
this with 2x nf-a25 fans would be pretty damn good for the space used

but how good compared to the u12A?
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#21
hat
Enthusiast
John Naylor said:

So your position is that we should recommending products that cost more, make more noise and perform worse ? If you can show us something that performs better , makes less noise and costs less and I'll recommend that instead. For me, it's always gonna be about the numbers.
I think you read my comment wrong. I was simply calling your attention to the thread because I know you like the Fuma, so I thought you'd be interested in the Fuma 2. :)
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#22
GreiverBlade
Axaion said:

this with 2x nf-a25 fans would be pretty damn good for the space used
why would you mess up the price and swap 2 perfectly capable fans bundled with the Heatsink for 2 fans from an overpriced brand ...

Axaion said:
but how good compared to the u12A?
you can bet it can be only good ... at 40$ less :laugh: even +5° non OC and -5° OC differences would make the Scythe a better deal (although can't take number from 2 reviews ... after all the -5° difference on OC was on a 4.8 8700K for the u12A and the Fuma 2 had a 9900K at 5.0 to cool down instead, same for the +5° ... 8700K 9900K ... who's the hotest :ohwell: )

John Naylor said:
So your position is that we should recommending products that cost more, make more noise and perform worse ?
i do agree strongly with you and also if it cost more and perform only slightly better : not worth it either.

John Naylor said:
If you can show us something that performs better , makes less noise and costs less and I'll recommend that instead.
and that's what most brand are to Noctua they all cost less perform on par or slightly under/over and noise is same +/-

asmotan said:
With CPU temp of 9900K running stock with room temp at 20.4C, it was 33C at idle and 85C at heavy load.

it's written 73° ... just in case ;)

but reading that review ... it seems more than decent for the price (and it's not a 120 for nearly 100$/€ )
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#23
Valantar
GreiverBlade said:

and that's what most brand are to Noctua they all cost less perform on par or slightly under/over and noise is same +/-
I don't know what your hearing is like, but that statement is pure nonsense. Yes, Noctua is expensive - nobody is denying that - but nobody comes even remotely close for noise normalised performance. Period. That's what the premium is paid for - not balls-to-the-wall performance, and not absolute silence, but the best combination of both. Sure, there are more powerful fans, like EK's Vardar, Sunon/Corsair MagLev or the fast version of the Gentle Typhoon - but they are also very noticeably noisier. Reviews show this quite clearly, but also miss the crucial fact of the audio profile, which is where Noctua always wins out for me - even when they're tied in terms of dBA, Noctua's fans generally sound more pleasant than the competition due to the sound frequency and patterns. There are also quieter fans, but none that match Noctua (at least not the NF-A12x25) in terms of performance. Usually the quiet competitors are slower, lower pressure, and perform worse on heatsinks and radiators alike.

Am I saying Noctua fans are always worth it? Of course not. If you're on a tight budget, spending $100 or more on a handful of fans is silly. But if you can afford it and want the best low-noise performance available, they can't be beat.
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#24
GreiverBlade
well ... the new u12A ... is ... on par with that one (even slightly noisier :p )
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indeed the 40$ premium over it make it worth it, i do agree ... (well that's a 120 versus a 140 although i would take a TR Macho 120 SBM over the u12A any time ... )

the only 2 sensible pros in favor of Noctua would be 1. warranty 2. customer service, although, that would be ... if i ever need any of those 2 ... i can recall one time with Thermalright and even out of warranty they replaced the piece and even gave me an extra set at the time (2 TY-147 and fixation + holding bracket) ... so, i am not 100% sure
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#25
RH92
Valantar said:

Yes, Noctua is expensive - nobody is denying that - but nobody comes even remotely close for noise normalised performance. Period. That's what the premium is paid for - not balls-to-the-wall performance, and not absolute silence, but the best combination of both. Sure, there are more powerful fans, like EK's Vardar, Sunon/Corsair MagLev or the fast version of the Gentle Typhoon - but they are also very noticeably noisier.Reviews show this quite clearly, but also miss the crucial fact of the audio profile, which is where Noctua always wins out for me
To be fair this is not totally true . Corsair ML120s and BeQuiet SW3s perform almost identical to NF-A12x25 ( wich is by far Noctuas best fan and one of the best 120mm fans we have ever seen ) when it comes to noise normalised ! Also when it comes to audio profile ( wich most of the time falls under bearing noise , although the shape of the blades plays aswell ) Maglevs have an advantage over any other type of bearing . NF-A12x25 really shines as a watercooling radiator fan at speeds above 1500rpm where it manages to be quieter by 2-3db ( or even more ) than the ML120 and SW3 but yeah that's a niche segment and certainly doesn't justify the huge price difference objectively speaking ! Don't get me wrong Noctua produces excellent products but sometimes peoples tend to exaggerate their effectiveness ( coming from a Noctua owner ) .
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