Monday, July 8th 2019

Intel Appoints Claire Dixon as Corporate Vice President and Chief Communications Officer

Intel Corporation today announced the appointment of Claire Dixon as corporate vice president and chief communications officer (CCO), effective July 1. Dixon will oversee Intel's global communications organization, including corporate communications and events, product public relations, employee communications and analyst relations. "Claire is a world-class communications leader and team-builder," said Bob Swan, Intel CEO. "She brings with her a wealth of global experience across enterprise technology and consumer industries and will be a tremendous addition to Intel's leadership team."

"I'm delighted to be joining the management team at this critical moment in the company's history," Dixon said. "Intel has an amazing heritage and a tremendous opportunity ahead. Communications has a vital role to play in Intel's continuing transformation, from evolving the culture to building reputation and trust with key stakeholders and creating a compelling narrative. "
Dixon joins Intel from VMware, where she was senior vice president and chief communications officer since 2017. At VMware, Dixon served on the company's executive committee and was responsible for leading the global communications organization. Prior to VMware, Dixon spent four years as vice president of global communications at eBay, where she worked with Swan on the spin out of PayPal. Dixon has also held senior roles at GlaxoSmithKline and Unilever when based in U.K.

She will report to Michelle Johnston Holthaus, Intel senior vice president and general manager of the Sales and Marketing Group and interim chief marketing officer.

Dixon is a British national and graduate of Cambridge University.
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8 Comments on Intel Appoints Claire Dixon as Corporate Vice President and Chief Communications Officer

#1
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
"....and creating a compelling narrative. "
"compelling narrative" is interchangeable with "bovine defecation."
Posted on Reply
#2
Vayra86
Hang on, Let me fix this

"Intel has an amazing heritage and a tremendous opportunity challenge ahead. Communications has failed miserably a vital role to play in Intel's continuing transformation, [..]"

btarunr, post: 4077169, member: 43587"
"compelling narrative" is interchangeable with "bovine defecation."
LOL so you get that urge to vomit, too? :D
Posted on Reply
#3
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
Vayra86, post: 4077170, member: 152404"
LOL so you get that urge to vomit, too? :D
Yeah, the same kind of nausea I get when accidentally watching CNN.
Posted on Reply
#4
lynx29
This article made me want to buy Ryzen 3000 and Navi. Screw waiting one more years boys!!! Time to support the red team!!! YEEEHAWWW
Posted on Reply
#5
B-Real
lynx29, post: 4077181, member: 153071"
This article made me want to buy Ryzen 3000 and Navi. Screw waiting one more years boys!!! Time to support the red team!!! YEEEHAWWW
So funny blue-green troll you are! lol.
Posted on Reply
#6
lynx29
B-Real, post: 4077226, member: 170068"
So funny blue-green troll you are! lol.
Keep it real dawg!
Posted on Reply
#7
R-T-B
btarunr, post: 4077169, member: 43587"
"compelling narrative" is interchangeable with "bovine defecation."
Maybe, but they call it "marketing" where I'm from and every company still needs it, as BS like as it may be.
Posted on Reply
#8
dyonoctis
Marketing got such a bad rep and it's often reduced to the communication aspect when it's much larger than that. Marketing is also doing an analysis to see what people want/need, what are the opportunities in the market, and therefore make sure that a company is going to make a product that's actually sellable.

Now, usually the communication part shouldn't be about doing huge sales figures, by trying to manipulate the clients whith half-truth (Hi Nvidia). It's actually a practice that's frowned upon in communication school because nowadays, the truth can come out easily from third party media outlet (Hi Nvidia, Hi Volskwagen). A good communication is supposed to be transparent, credible with the actual facts, and not bite you in the ass at any point.

The issue is that for a huge amount of people the hard truth isn't enough to convince them, so you need something else than numbers to make them buy your product, and that's where the fancy stuff comes into play. Even then it should only be a way to make the truth look more appealing for people who are more sensible than pragmatic, but never change the hard cold data.

And my personal experience showed me that when there's a foul play, it's not always the fault of the communication service, but rather the people higher in the hierarchy who are willing to take a risk if it means making more money, or because they think that they understand how to communicate, when they don't. If the heads of the company itself are shady, it's will be hard for the communication to get away from the shadyness... there's a lot to say about how the internal mindset of a company end up leaking to the outside world.
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