Wednesday, August 7th 2019

PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil Pictured

Here are some of the first pictures of the PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil graphics card. This is the company's most premium custom-design product based on the RX 5700 XT, and combines a custom-design PCB with a large triple-slot cooling solution that features an aluminium fin-stack heatsink that's ventilated by a trio of 80 mm spinners.

The card offers idle-fan stop, dual-BIOS, voltage measurement points, and addressable-RGB LED embellishments along the card's top and back-plate. The card is also expected to feature the company's highest factory-overclock. The card pulls power from a pair of 8-pin PCIe power connectors, while display outputs include three DisplayPorts and an HDMI.

Update: PowerColor hopes to launch the RX 5700 XT Red Devil graphics card by August 13th.

Update Aug 15th: Our review of the Powercolor RX 5700 XT Red Devil is posted now.
Source: VideoCardz
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17 Comments on PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil Pictured

#1
Aldain
Hopes??

It launches August 13..
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#2
raptori
The shroud looks amazing but the glossy fans are straight awful.
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#3
ShurikN
Damn that thing is huge...
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#4
Chrispy_
raptori, post: 4093858, member: 50662"
The shroud looks amazing but the glossy fans are straight awful.
Yeah, but glossy fans are supposed to be quieter than textured fans, and you can't really see them when they're spinning anyway.
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#5
deu
I see some ASUS STRIX design inspiration?
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#6
RainingTacco
Looks sexy, but seriously why are GPUs getting bigger and bigger?
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#7
IceShroom
Even though this is a Devil card, but dosen't the heatsink looks overkill for a 225W card??
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#8
Suka
IceShroom, post: 4094115, member: 175457"
Even though this is a Devil card, but dosen't the heatsink looks overkill for a 225W card??
Competition is the dictator and 2.1Ghz overclock
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#9
sam_86314
Red Devil... but it isn't red anymore...

I'd probably choose this over an ASUS Strix card. The heatsink looks beefier and the shroud doesn't look like it'll block as much airflow. I also like that the heatsink is longer than the PCB like the Red Dragon Vega cards. That'd probably help cooling a bit.
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#10
Rivage
Black is new red.
Looks horrible tho
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#11
Dave65
Can't wait for some benchies:toast:
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#12
moob
sam_86314, post: 4094249, member: 178042"
Red Devil... but it isn't red anymore...

I'd probably choose this over an ASUS Strix card. The heatsink looks beefier and the shroud doesn't look like it'll block as much airflow. I also like that the heatsink is longer than the PCB like the Red Dragon Vega cards. That'd probably help cooling a bit.
Speaking as someone who has a Red Dragon Vega 56, I really like this design too. Not only does it keep the card quite cool, it's incredibly quiet as well. The only real problem with the design is the position of the power connectors. It isn't quiet as extreme as with my card, where it ends up being almost in the middle of the card since the PCB is so short, but if you want a super clean look it does ugly things up just a bit. Definitely not a deal breaker though, since the performance is fantastic.
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#13
Chrispy_
RainingTacco, post: 4094021, member: 188847"
Looks sexy, but seriously why are GPUs getting bigger and bigger?
Two reasons.
  1. OEMS like Powercolor pay vendors like AMD for chips based on bin. Not all 5700XT chips are equal - there is ASIC quality and chips that are 'leaky' with a low ASIC quality will need bigger heatsinks and perversely, may have a better tolerance for higher voltages and overclocking. The cost savings on these lower-quality bins of GPU outweigh the extra cost of a larger cooler, and the bonus of factory overclocking and overvolting the card looks more appealing to sell because higher speeds are worth more money to consumers, right?
  2. People don't buy loud cards anymore. Some people will, but then the user reviews on the retail sites will be 3-star ratings that point out the noise problem and everyone else will buy the competitor's product that has 5-star reviews praising how quiet the card is. Making the heatsink bigger and cooling better is very cheap for OEMs, so they do this rather than stick to the spec, even if that means that the cooling is completely overkill.
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#14
yakk
That is huge indeed for such a small GPU! :eek:

PowerColor competing with Asus on size apparently...
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#15
kapone32
Suka, post: 4094208, member: 131919"
Competition is the dictator and 2.1Ghz overclock
Is that the clock speed on this card?
Posted on Reply
#16
RainingTacco
Chrispy_, post: 4097559, member: 185623"
Two reasons.
  1. OEMS like Powercolor pay vendors like AMD for chips based on bin. Not all 5700XT chips are equal - there is ASIC quality and chips that are 'leaky' with a low ASIC quality will need bigger heatsinks and perversely, may have a better tolerance for higher voltages and overclocking. The cost savings on these lower-quality bins of GPU outweigh the extra cost of a larger cooler, and the bonus of factory overclocking and overvolting the card looks more appealing to sell because higher speeds are worth more money to consumers, right?
  2. People don't buy loud cards anymore. Some people will, but then the user reviews on the retail sites will be 3-star ratings that point out the noise problem and everyone else will buy the competitor's product that has 5-star reviews praising how quiet the card is. Making the heatsink bigger and cooling better is very cheap for OEMs, so they do this rather than stick to the spec, even if that means that the cooling is completely overkill.

Thanks but my question was, why with smaller transistors, GPUs are getting bigger, and their PCB grow larger. Also power consumption is getting lower and power efficiency is getting higher, and yet the GPUs needs more cooling. I though that with smaller process, we will get smaller electronics.
Posted on Reply
#17
Chrispy_
RainingTacco, post: 4098384, member: 188847"
Thanks but my question was, why with smaller transistors, GPUs are getting bigger, and their PCB grow larger. Also power consumption is getting lower and power efficiency is getting higher, and yet the GPUs needs more cooling. I though that with smaller process, we will get smaller electronics.
Smaller process and lower power consumption would result in physically smaller graphics cards if the design stayed the same, but as each new process becomes harder to make and develop, manufacturers compensate by using more transistors and shoving more power through them to get faster clockspeeds.

If you want a real idea of what a decade of GPU progress looks like, this is the 2007 Nvidia 8800 Ultra - a 171W full-length, dual-slot beast of a card:
https://www.techpowerup.com/gpu-specs/geforce-8800-ultra.c195

And here is the 2017 Geforce GT 1030. It comes in a variety of configurations but the cheapest one uses just 20W in a tiny half-height, half-length, single-slot card. Despite this, it's around 3x faster than the 8800Ultra:
https://www.techpowerup.com/gpu-specs/geforce-gt-1030.c2954
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