Monday, September 23rd 2019

Power Matters with EVGA PowerLink - Clean up your Power and System!

Everyone knows that the EVGA PowerLink does wonders to improve your cable management for your graphics card. But did you know that the EVGA PowerLink also stabilizes the power going into your graphics card? The EVGA PowerLink is designed to provide both a more stable power source and reduce ripple and noise, compared to connecting your power supply directly to the graphics card. The EVGA PowerLink features two solid state capacitors that help to filter/suppress ripple and noise from the power supply.

The practical impact can be seen in power graphs. The 12V line going into graphics card without a PowerLink under load rates a Peak-to-Peak voltage of 1,008mV, while the 12V line going into the graphics card with a PowerLink is only 728mV. That's nearly a 28% reduction in voltage variation from the external power source!
Revolutionized Cable Management
The EVGA PowerLink has another function: to make your PC look even more awesome. This adapter allows you to reroute the power inputs for your graphics card, giving you improved case airflow, a lower profile height, and best of all, cleaner wiring setup. It even supports a unique configuration system allowing you to mix and match power input types to match your graphics card.
Available Now
The EVGA PowerLink is a great investment to not only improve the way your PC looks, but also protect your graphics card. Source: EVGA PowerLink
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36 Comments on Power Matters with EVGA PowerLink - Clean up your Power and System!

#1
ncrs
So it's just 2 capacitors inside all that plastic? Pretty sure there's enough of those on the cards already...
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#2
LocutusH
What if they just dont put the power connectors on the top, but at the end of the card, by default?
I know, they couldnt sell an additional piece of plastic, for shameless high price.
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#3
Chomiq
LocutusH
What if they just dont put the power connectors on the top, but at the end of the card, by default?
I know, they couldnt sell an additional piece of plastic, for shameless high price.
Since EVGA uses reference pcb for their basic cards this would require changes by Nvidia, or a complete switch to custom pcb across their entire lineup.
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#4
Basard
What's the point if there is no RGB......
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#5
phill
I do like these connections from EVGA, surprised they aren't bundled with any of the cards they sell to be honest.... Well for the cards that need it anyways :)
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#6
xkm1948
I got one for $5 free shipping last uear. Good for cable management. And yeah you can paint that EVGA logo to match your case theme for sure. I like it
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#7
ZoneDymo
"The EVGA PowerLink is a great investment to not only improve the way your PC looks, but also protect your graphics card. "

Jeez, not getting an EVGA psu any time soon....
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#8
bogami
In order for this element to be 50% narrower and even more beautifully made, there is no mention here of an element adapted to difoult cards, and it is in this picture that you can see how much higher the output port is. This product has been on the market for some time now and anyone who has acquired a little bit of reason can do it alone. Unfortunately, a good idea is given in the bad-looking miserable looks. And that's not what sells this product ! All for quick and mega profit .
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#9
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
xkm1948
I got one for $5 free shipping last uear. Good for cable management.
I was just thinking this actually. cables coming out of the bottom of the card rather than the side would make for a cleaner nicer looking build. Sadly it currently costs about $20-25 here so its currently a waste of money for something that does little to nothing.
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#10
Nuckles56
I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned the crazy peak to peak voltages that EVGA were using for this test, no decent modern PSU should be coming anywhere near those numbers
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#11
xkm1948
FreedomEclipse
I was just thinking this actually. cables coming out of the bottom of the card rather than the side would make for a cleaner nicer looking build. Sadly it currently costs about $20-25 here so its currently a waste of money for something that does little to nothing.
Deals on this pops up every now and then on Amazon.

Nuckles56
I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned the crazy peak to peak voltages that EVGA were using for this test, no decent modern PSU should be coming anywhere near those numbers
IMO this thing’s main sale point is cable management.
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#12
jonnyGURU
Nuckles56
I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned the crazy peak to peak voltages that EVGA were using for this test, no decent modern PSU should be coming anywhere near those numbers
Probably an EVGA "W" Series. :D
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#13
Ferrum Master
They are measuring voltage sag or transient response. They state 1V on the 12V rail... the 1.2V are the ATX spec 10% max there should be. Basically I don't know where they found such shit PSU with hair thick wires attached to it. Even vintage supplies doesn't deviate that much.

I understand PR crap and so on... but... man... this is schizophrenia coming out of EVGA. Snake oil at its finest... or even more, like false claims.
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#14
Valantar
Nuckles56
I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned the crazy peak to peak voltages that EVGA were using for this test, no decent modern PSU should be coming anywhere near those numbers
Yeah, that's nearly 10x the ATX spec for 12V ripple. Ridiculous.
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#15
Ferrum Master
Valantar
Yeah, that's nearly 10x the ATX spec for 12V ripple. Ridiculous.
Nah nah. It is not ripple. It is just voltage sag.
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#16
Valantar
Ferrum Master
Nah nah. It is not ripple. It is just voltage sag.
You mean voltage drop over the power cables? That doesn't measure like what we see in those graphs (those are spruced-up scope shots of riople/noise), and capacitors in the cables does nothing to combat that. You need sense wires and a PSU capable of monitoring them to combat wire voltage drop. And speaking of peak-to-peak voltages makes zero sense if you're talking about voltage drop.
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#17
Ferrum Master
Valantar
You mean voltage drop over the power cables? That doesn't measure like what we see in those graphs (those are spruced-up scope shots of riople/noise), and capacitors in the cables does nothing to combat that. You need sense wires and a PSU capable of monitoring them to combat wire voltage drop. And speaking of peak-to-peak voltages makes zero sense if you're talking about voltage drop.
It states. Well it is written totally in awkward manner, but the numbers only make sense about voltage sag(Transient Response), when doing instant high burst current loads for the GPU. Crmaris does this always, albeit in different manner, without capacities at all. In reality the GPU itself has those caps, also making these claims a fairy tail. Unless the PSU is bad/old such sag doesn't happen.
The 12V line going into graphics card without a PowerLink under load rates a Peak-to-Peak voltage of 1,008mV, while the 12V line going into the graphics card with a PowerLink is only 728mV. That's nearly a 28% reduction in voltage variation from the external power source!
Also some rubbish, there is no power graph.
seen in power graphs
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#18
randomUser
xkm1948
I got one for $5 free shipping last uear. Good for cable management. And yeah you can paint that EVGA logo to match your case theme for sure. I like it
Please give a link or a name. I couldn't find anything on aliexpress.
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#19
zlobby
jonnyGURU
Probably an EVGA "W" Series. :D
I bow down to only 2 men - JonnyGURU and Johnny Sins!
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#20
randomUser
I have a seasonic PSU and it states it has 0.5% ripple on primary 12V rail and +2% ripple on secondary rail.
So its 60mV on primary rail and 240mV on secondary. Will this thing reduce ripple even more?
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#21
xkm1948
randomUser
Please give a link or a name. I couldn't find anything on aliexpress.
??? This is the SKU i got. It was on sale for just $5 and free shipping

buildapcsales/comments/9vm00l
Posted on Reply
#22
Chloe Price
LocutusH
What if they just dont put the power connectors on the top, but at the end of the card, by default?
I know, they couldnt sell an additional piece of plastic, for shameless high price.
Back in the day they were at the back, though we need to go over 10 years back to the Radeon HD 4000 era.
Posted on Reply
#23
Valantar
Ferrum Master
It states. Well it is written totally in awkward manner, but the numbers only make sense about voltage sag(Transient Response), when doing instant high burst current loads for the GPU. Crmaris does this always, albeit in different manner, without capacities at all. In reality the GPU itself has those caps, also making these claims a fairy tail. Unless the PSU is bad/old such sag doesn't happen.



Also some rubbish, there is no power graph.
I disagree with your interpretation. They clearly state that this is supposed to be "under load" (I interpret this as a gaming load or similar relatively even and high CPU+GPU load) in which case significant transient loads are relatively unlikely and not likely to make much of a difference due to the significant stress already on the PSU. Also, again, the stylized "see the difference" PR shots can only be interpreted as stylized representations of scope shots of ripple/noise - they certainly don't show any transient response, but rather try to show that one has less ripple than the other. Thirdly, mVp-p is normally a term used for noise and ripple, not other voltage fluctuations in DC. Transient response is generally not described in those terms. Heck, the PR copy even explicitly says this is to filter/suppress noise/ripple. They just went with some downright stupid numbers trying to demonstrate this.

ncrs
So it's just 2 capacitors inside all that plastic? Pretty sure there's enough of those on the cards already...
Well, two capacitors, four PCIe power connectors (two male, two female) and some wires to be precise. But yes, essentially. The main point of this is definitely cleaning up cabling.
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#24
Ferrum Master
Valantar
I disagree with your interpretation. They clearly state that this is supposed to be "under load"
Have a peek in our PSU review section I linked, and what graphs are there. You can draw it also like that if you look through a scope.

There cannot be a 1V ripple anyways... they aren't taking mushrooms or LSD...

Oh wait...
Posted on Reply
#25
Tomorrow
Everyone here focusing on the capacitors. But you all miss the mark. Does this new PowerLink have the ability to reverse polarity? Problably not.

I will explain why this matters. You see PowerLink is only compatible with cards that have power connectors facing one specific way. Im speaking about wheter the release latch is at the top or at the bottom.
Im pretty sure all EVGA cards have the latch at the bottom (when the card is installed).

However not all cards from ather manufacturers do. For example at one point i ordered PowerLink for my Zotac GTX 1080 only to discover that since it had latches at the top i was unable to use PowerLink.
There's actually a topic on EVGA forums where someone modded theirs to reverse polarity: https://forums.evga.com/EVGA-powerlink-polarity-modification-m2619471.aspx

So while i really like this concept im afraid it has limited compatibility. Just FYI if you do plan on buying it - do your research.
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