Friday, November 15th 2019

NEC Launches the MultiSync PA311D Monitor: 31" IPS, 4K, 10-bit color, 100% AdobeRGB Coverage

NEC today announced the launch of the MultiSync PA311D, a new 31-inch IPS wide color gamut display with a 4K (4096x2160) resolution. "The MultiSync PA311D will take its place as our flagship monitor in the PA Series of professional desktop displays," said Kevin Christopherson, Director of Product Marketing at NEC Display Solutions. "It provides higher resolution, along with better black levels and contrast. Further, the PA311D includes USB-C connectivity with 65 W charging and several new cutting-edge features to meet the color-critical needs of professional graphic designers, photographers and video producers."
The PA311D provides incredibly accurate color due to each unit's individual factory calibration. It features true 10-bit color with a 14-bit 3D LUT for impeccable accuracy, and supports all professional color spaces (sRGB, Adobe RGB and DCI-P3) and standard video color spaces (Rec. 709, Rec. 2100). Additionally, it supports the HLG and PQ HDR standards. This model also includes NEC's custom color processor, the SpectraView II Engine, an always-on backlight sensor for stable color and brightness for the life of the display, as well as a low-latency mode when working with live video. Additionally, Picture in Picture, Picture by Picture and ICC profile support simplify color-critical workflows.
  • 100% coverage of AdobeRGB color space
  • Superior screen performance (1400:1 contrast ratio, 4096x2160 true 4K native resolution, 350cd/m2 brightness)
  • HDR support
  • 14-bit 3D internal programmable lookup tables (LUTs) for calibration
  • Picture in Picture and Picture by Picture modes increase productivity by displaying two sources simultaneously
  • MultiProfiler software provides complete control over the five picture modes, including the loading of any ICC profile directly into the monitor for optimal color space matching
  • DisplaySync ProTM controls three computers with only one keyboard and mouse
  • Wide connectivity includes both regular and Mini DisplayPort with 10-bit support, 10-bit HDMI, and USB Type-C with 65W of power delivery
  • Human Sensor saves power when not in use
  • DisplayPort cable compatibility notice
  • NaViSet Administrator 2: Free software solution that greatly eases administration and management of larger display device installations
  • Available with SpectraViewII Color Calibration Kit (PA311d-BK-SV)
The PA311D is touch capable and comes equipped with a 150 mm adjustable stand with tilt and swivel capabilities. It is also available with an optional hood (HD2PA31). For the first time in its category, the PA311D offers USB-C connectivity, capable of 65 W charging. Combined with USB-C, it also offers best-in-class connectivity with DisplayPort 1.2 (2), HDMI (2), and a USB 3.1 hub (2 up/3 down).

Designed and manufactured to last, the MultiSync PA311D is backed by a 4-year warranty. It is available November 2019 at a minimum advertised price of $2,999 and in a SpectraView bundle for $3,249. The optional HD2PA31 hood is available for $299. Source: Guru3D
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23 Comments on NEC Launches the MultiSync PA311D Monitor: 31" IPS, 4K, 10-bit color, 100% AdobeRGB Coverage

#1
lynx29
For only 1 grand more you can have the Mini-LED that Asus just launched, and if you have 3 grand, you prob have 4 grand... so yeah if I was in the market for that which I am not, better off going with the new Mini-LED tech from Asus for 4 grand.

gg NEC.
Posted on Reply
#2
bug
lynx29
For only 1 grand more you can have the Mini-LED that Asus just launched, and if you have 3 grand, you prob have 4 grand... so yeah if I was in the market for that which I am not, better off going with the new Mini-LED tech from Asus for 4 grand.

gg NEC.
Because Asus is just as known for professional monitors as NEC :wtf:

On another note, did anyone else read "Kris Christopherson"?
Posted on Reply
#3
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Now if they would release a gaming monitor tailored for true light/color
Posted on Reply
#4
bug
eidairaman1
Now if they would release a gaming monitor tailored for true light/color
NEC doesn't do gaming displays ;)
Posted on Reply
#5
Sicofante
bug
Because Asus is just as known for professional monitors as NEC
Actually Asus is well known for its monitors for video post-production. This monitor from NEC is great for photographers or graphics artists, but useless for HDR video with its 350 nits.
Posted on Reply
#6
bug
Sicofante
Actually Asus is well known for its monitors for video post-production. This monitor from NEC is great for photographers or graphics artists, but useless for HDR video with its 350 nits.
Really? The only "professional" monitors I know from Asus is their ProArt line and that started only recently.
Posted on Reply
#7
Sicofante
bug
Really? The only "professional" monitors I know from Asus is their ProArt line and that started only recently.
Yes, really. It doesn't matter when it started. They are right now the best monitors for HDR video in its class and price range. The next step (Flanders Scientific, Sony reference OLEDs, etc. ) are in another price league. The upcoming Mac Pro monitor is just slightly better at twice the price. Nothing beats the ProArt's price/performance ratio these days and everyone knows that in the video world.
Posted on Reply
#8
lynx29
bug
Because Asus is just as known for professional monitors as NEC :wtf:

On another note, did anyone else read "Kris Christopherson"?
this new Mini-LED is, and has better specs than this in regards to color accuracy... if you actually read the new Asus Mini-LED product description.
Posted on Reply
#9
TheLostSwede
This does have one selling point, it's a real full frame 4K display with 4096x2160 resolution.
This is also part of the reason for the stupid price tag.
Posted on Reply
#10
mohammed2006
i had past nec monitor they have internal upscaler. which was nice the new asus although 4k$ over shadow this. and why i cant find any website talk about canon DP-V3210 monitor this thing is a killer.
Posted on Reply
#11
lynx29
TheLostSwede
This does have one selling point, it's a real full frame 4K display with 4096x2160 resolution.
This is also part of the reason for the stupid price tag.
Monoprice also sells a 4096x2160 monitor, 27" - for around $299. i mean yeah color calibration not even close to this one, but just saying, they do exist in the wild.
Posted on Reply
#12
spooh
Professional displays are not about features or performance.
The Devil is in the detail:
- aging control
- spectral composition of colors
- metamerism control
- programmable LUT
- high screen brightness uniformity
- small differences across units
....and so on

Among photo/graphic grade monitors there are only two manufacturers who cover most of the above (and Asus or Apple are not among them).
Posted on Reply
#13
lynx29
spooh
Professional displays are not about features or performance.
The Devil is in the detail:
- aging control
- spectral composition of colors
- metamerism control
- programmable LUT
- high screen brightness uniformity
- small differences across units
....and so on

Among photo/graphic grade monitors there are only two manufacturers who cover most of the above (and Asus or Apple are not among them).
You underestimate Mini and Micro LED technology, enjoy your old tech folks, see ya.
Posted on Reply
#14
Chomiq
lynx29
You underestimate Mini and Micro LED technology, enjoy your old tech folks, see ya.
Here's a pro tip. This is what's used for studio reference video production:

Only €37,000
Where's your Mini and Micro LED now?

This NEC will be used by professionals for photo editing etc. This is not a gaming display. This is also not a studio reference monitor for video editing so no point in complaining about 350 cd/m2 max brightness. This will be used in controlled lighting conditions.
Posted on Reply
#15
lynx29
Chomiq
Here's a pro tip. This is what's used for studio reference video production:

Only €37,000
Where's your Mini and Micro LED now?

This NEC will be used by professionals for photo editing etc. This is not a gaming display. This is also not a studio reference monitor for video editing so no point in complaining about 350 cd/m2 max brightness. This will be used in controlled lighting conditions.
Well Micro LED isn't even here yet... so can't really compare yet... lol

I highly doubt anything rivals OLED, I'd have to see it to believe it.



also timestamped the video for you, that LCD is actually worse than OLED, has yellow tint and horrible viewing angles according to that youtube guy. LOL no thanks OLED is still king.
Posted on Reply
#16
Chomiq
lynx29
Well Micro LED isn't even here yet... so can't really compare yet... lol

I highly doubt anything rivals OLED, I'd have to see it to believe it.

also timestamped the video for you, that LCD is actually worse than OLED, has yellow tint and horrible viewing angles according to that youtube guy. LOL no thanks OLED is still king.
OLED isn't a king of anything, especially not with its limited peak brightness.
Posted on Reply
#17
jabbadap
spooh
Professional displays are not about features or performance.
The Devil is in the detail:
- aging control
- spectral composition of colors
- metamerism control
- programmable LUT
- high screen brightness uniformity
- small differences across units
....and so on

Among photo/graphic grade monitors there are only two manufacturers who cover most of the above (and Asus or Apple are not among them).
EIZO perhaps? Kind of inline with almost similar spec'ed "old" EIZO ColorEdge CG319X, pricing is quite there too...
Posted on Reply
#18
lynx29
Chomiq
OLED isn't a king of anything, especially not with its limited peak brightness.
I saw OLED at Best Buy on display before, seemed plenty bright to my eyes. also if you gaming at like 400+ nits and max brightness you prob are damaging your eyes in long term.
Posted on Reply
#19
TheLostSwede
lynx29
Monoprice also sells a 4096x2160 monitor, 27" - for around $299. i mean yeah color calibration not even close to this one, but just saying, they do exist in the wild.
Looks like it was discontinued, only thing I could find was this.
https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=34419
Posted on Reply
#20
Khonjel
Don't saturated colors seem more vibrant, more colorful to us laymans vs color-accurate ones? That's why most people love V shaped sounding headphones. Sounds more fun than flat signature studio headphones.
Posted on Reply
#21
lynx29
TheLostSwede
Looks like it was discontinued, only thing I could find was this.
https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=34419
no, they have one that is $299, listed as regular 3840 x 2160 or w.e 4k, but when you actually hook it up it lets you switch to 4096 x 2160, i know i own it. forget exact model though. it might cost more now, I got mine on sell like a year ago
Posted on Reply
#22
bug
lynx29
this new Mini-LED is, and has better specs than this in regards to color accuracy... if you actually read the new Asus Mini-LED product description.
Oh, I've been looking for a good 32" HDR capable monitor, believe I've read about ProArt. The problem with Asus is while they can tick almost any number of boxes, their QC is all over the place. So yeah, while I know good mini-LED is supposed to be (this is actually more of a joke: we were first fed crappy HDR monitors with a handful of dimming zones and now that someone managed to up the number of dimming zones - still nowhere near where they need to be - people get all excited), I still have to see studios using ProArt for post production and such.
Posted on Reply
#23
Chomiq
lynx29
I saw OLED at Best Buy on display before, seemed plenty bright to my eyes. also if you gaming at like 400+ nits and max brightness you prob are damaging your eyes in long term.
I'm talking about localized peak brightness. I.e. 1000 nits for sun and everything else is much much lower. Or the scene in the original Matrix with white background where white is white, not a dimmed white. LG E9 can barely pull off 700 nits and it will dim to prevent damage to the OLED. That's why that reference LCD with monochrome layer in between can pull it off and OLED fails.
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