Monday, February 3rd 2020

Mushkin Launches PILOT-E Series NVMe SSDs

Mushkin has announced availability of their updated PILOT-E NVMe M.2 SSDs, which build upon their previously released PILOT family of SSDs. The PILOT-E are offered in the M.2 2280 form-factor, and make use of the PCIe 3.0 x4 interface to achieve speeds of up to 3,500 MB/s sequential reads and 3,100 MB/s sequential writes. The PILOT-E SSDs make use of Silicon Motion's SM2262EN" controller, which supports up to 8 NAND channels for increased throughput which connects to the PILOT-E's 3D TLC NAND.

The PILOT-E family of NVMe SSDs will be available in capacities ranging from 500 GB up to 2 TB, which seems about right for current market trends. The 500 GB model will feature the lowest performance figures at 3,500 MB/s sequential reads,2,300 MB/s sequential writes, random reads at 344,400 IOPS, random writes at 343,000 IOPS, and a write endurance rated at 350 TBW. The PILOT-e counts with SLC cache for improved performance, as well as LDPC ECC, end-to-end protection, global wear leveling, static data refresh, HMB, and AES 256-bit encryption. MTBF is set at 1.5 million hours, and typical warranty is set at three years. I'm seeing pricing starting at $74,99 for the 500 GB version and $249.99 for the 2 TB one.
Sources: via Guru3D, Amazon.com
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22 Comments on Mushkin Launches PILOT-E Series NVMe SSDs

#1
EarthDog
You may want to have this edited...typos galore.
Posted on Reply
#2
kapone32
Why are there no sub $200 2TB NVME drives?
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#3
Tomorrow
kapone32
Why are there no sub $200 2TB NVME drives?
There almost are but they are QLC. Frankly QLC needs to be cheaper. If i am already buying a ~200'ish SSD then i will rather pay a little extra for TLC.
Posted on Reply
#4
kapone32
Tomorrow
There almost are but they are QLC. Frankly QLC needs to be cheaper. If i am already buying a ~200'ish SSD then i will rather pay a little extra for TLC.
Especially now that they have gone to 96 layer. I am looking directly at the 665P but it is more expensive than the 660P which was 64 layer.

www.newegg.ca/intel-660p-series-1tb/p/N82E16820167462?Description=Intel%20660P&cm_re=Intel_660P-_-20-167-462-_-Product

www.newegg.ca/intel-665p-series-1tb/p/N82E16820167469?item=N82E16820167469&source=region&nm_mc=knc-googleadwordsca-pc&cm_mmc=knc-googleadwordsca-pc-_-pla-_-solid+state+disk-_-N82E16820167469&gclid=Cj0KCQiApt_xBRDxARIsAAMUMu-uIO11gZw97SuaKsne4CbjSC5rWRf-auOpglhHFqtbmtnduelhOvAaAmQKEALw_wcB
Posted on Reply
#5
Tomorrow
Indeed. Makes no logical sense that 96L is more expensive than 64L. Not sure what Intel is thinking.
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#6
kapone32
Tomorrow
Indeed. Makes no logical sense that 96L is more expensive than 64L. Not sure what Intel is thinking.
My guess is the R&D costs of 96 layer. I do believe they developed 96 layer with Crucial/Micron.
Posted on Reply
#7
jsfitz54
ERROR:
"The PILOT-e counts with SLC cache for improved performance,"

I think the drive "comes" with SLC cache.
Posted on Reply
#8
EarthDog
jsfitz54
ERROR:
"The PILOT-e counts with SLC cache for improved performance,"

I think the drive "comes" with SLC cache.
One... of many...
Raevenlord
Mushkin has announces availability
Should be announced
Raevenlord
The PILOT-E are offered
...is offered... (Pilot-E is a single thing as written, so 'is' should be used). That is also passive voice.
Raevenlord
and make use of the
...makes use of the.... (?)
Raevenlord
sequential reads,2,300
sequential reads, 2,300....
Raevenlord
which supports up to 8 NAND channels for increased throughput which connects to the PILOT-E's 3D TLC NAND.
...throughput and connects to...... (this sentence is awkward).
Raevenlord
The PILOT-e counts
Pilot-E

Not even getting into the comma use. Feels gratuitous. :p
Posted on Reply
#9
bonehead123
At this point in time, I will absolutely not pay anything even close to $250 for a pcie 3 drive..... $175 maybe, but even thats pushing it IMHO.....

As with other things, like USB-C, DDR5, etc, the sooner moar mfgr's start making moar of the newer gen devices (pcie 4), the sooner we will get moar mobos, gpu's ect that can utilize the increased bandwidth & performance.....

Chicken & egg concept, I know, but just sayin :)
Posted on Reply
#10
kapone32
bonehead123
At this point in time, I will absolutely not pay anything even close to $250 for a pcie 3 drive..... $175 maybe, but even thats pushing it IMHO.....

As with other things, like USB-C, DDR5, etc, the sooner moar mfgr's start making moar of the newer gen devices (pcie 4), the sooner we will get moar mobos, gpu's ect that can utilize the increased bandwidth & performance.....

Chicken & egg concept, I know, but just sayin :)
Well PCI_E 4.0 drives have been out for a while and have no impact on 3.0 pricing. I fully agree with your sentiment though.
Posted on Reply
#11
R-T-B
lolwut, I have had one of these since last November (2TB version), what kind of timewarp is this where you are claiming they just announced these things... TPU what even?

Heck, here is the review I read, from October:

www.tomshardware.com/reviews/mushkin-pilot-e-m.2-nvme-ssd,6345.html

This is one of the only drives to feature OPAL support on decent SMI controllers. I know, I did my research. They feature either Micron or SK Hynix DRAM chips, for the curious.

They are also double sided in the 2TB variant, which makes heatsinks interesting...
Tomorrow
Indeed. Makes no logical sense that 96L is more expensive than 64L. Not sure what Intel is thinking.
I mean more layers is likely more reliable because they use a larger node, so technically there is some value to the consumer.
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#12
EarthDog
Mushkin is a bit odd. I've reviewed a couple of their drives and had them in hand and reviewed well before launch/availability (Helix-L for example). Maybe that is what's going on? Now they are available? No idea.
Posted on Reply
#13
R-T-B
EarthDog
Mushkin is a bit odd. I've reviewed a couple of their drives and had them in hand and reviewed well before launch/availability (Helix-L for example). Maybe that is what's going on? Now they are available? No idea.
Maybe. But I mean... Amazon.com sold it to me. Not some market vendor. It sure confuses me, lol.
Posted on Reply
#14
EarthDog
Oh..you've had it in hand? Lol
Posted on Reply
#15
R-T-B
EarthDog
Oh..you've had it in hand? Lol
Yeah, been using it and talked about it here briefly way back in like November. That's when I bought it.

She's been in my main system seeing quite a bit of writes, since then:

Posted on Reply
#16
MKRonin
Haven't seen an M.2 drive mounted to a mobo like that before. I wonder if it gets better airflow and runs cooler in that config. Anybody know what board that is?
Posted on Reply
#17
EarthDog
MKRonin
Haven't seen an M.2 drive mounted to a mobo like that before. I wonder if it gets better airflow and runs cooler in that config. Anybody know what board that is?
Likely an Asus of some sort...and an older one? They are the only ones I recall offhand that had the vertical mounting.
Posted on Reply
#18
Ciric
MKRonin
Haven't seen an M.2 drive mounted to a mobo like that before. I wonder if it gets better airflow and runs cooler in that config. Anybody know what board that is?
Asus X99 have these, (At least my old X99 Deluxe II did).
Posted on Reply
#19
timta2
MTBF is set at 1.5 million hours, and typical warranty is set at three years.
Saying that these are "set" is pretty weird, especially when you're talking about something that's averaged or in the middle of two extremes, without a specific number.
Posted on Reply
#20
bonehead123
MKRonin
Haven't seen an M.2 drive mounted to a mobo like that before. I wonder if it gets better airflow and runs cooler in that config. Anybody know what board that is?
I don't recall ever seeing a vertical mounted m.2 drive, but if you have the room in your case, it would surely be better, airflow/tempwise, than all the others that are (stupidly) stuck under your gpu (which is why I put all of mine on pcie riser cards)....
Posted on Reply
#21
kapone32
bonehead123
I don't recall ever seeing a vertical mounted m.2 drive, but if you have the room in your case, it would surely be better, airflow/tempwise, than all the others that are (stupidly) stuck under your gpu (which is why I put all of mine on pcie riser cards)....
Asus has some on their MBs. I have seen one on the X399 Prime. I agree with you though. I actually like As Rock boards for putting the first NVME before the 1st x16 slot on their AM4 boards.
Posted on Reply
#22
EarthDog
kapone32
Asus has some on their MBs. I have seen one on the X399 Prime. I agree with you though. I actually like As Rock boards for putting the first NVME before the 1st x16 slot on their AM4 boards.
Yep, said that earlier (and someone else after me too)... the only one I can think of offhand.

I just don't think there is a good spot for these, honestly. I prefer BELOW the GPU. Heat rising off the GPU tends to warm these things up. Whereas if it is below the GPU, it doesn't get as much heated air across it. All depends on airflow too of course... but generally, I would imagine below it (far below it) is best for not sucking up GPU heat.
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