Thursday, February 20th 2020

Intel 10th Gen Core "Comet Lake-S" IGP-Disabled Processor Lineup Detailed

With its 9th generation Core processor series, Intel adapted an interesting strategy to maximize its yields and increase competitiveness of its desktop processors. The "F" model number extension would go on to denote a lack of integrated graphics. It could be used in conjunction with other extensions such as "K" (unlocked base-clock multiplier). Completely disabling integrated graphics would allow Intel to salvage dies on which the iGPU component, which takes up a large chunk of the die area, doesn't clear validation. Intel refers to this as "GT0" (graphics tier zero), to fit into its iGPU tier differentiation scheme. The company also tends to price its "F" SKUs slightly lower, letting it compete with AMD Ryzen chips better. A case in point is the Core i5-9400F, often found under $160, and proving a strong alternative to the Ryzen 5 series for gaming PCs. With the 10th generation "Comet Lake-S" family, the company is planning several new "F" and "KF" SKUs.

According to a company slide leaked to the web by InformaticaCero, there are at least three each of "F" and "KF" SKUs in the works. The lineup includes the 10-core/20-thread i9-10900KF and i9-10900F; the 8-core/16-thread i7-10700KF and i7-10700F; and the 6-core/12-thread i5-10600KF and i5-10600F. Clock speeds and cache sizes of these chips are identical to their corresponding non-F SKUs (eg: i7-10700KF clock-speeds being identical to those of the i7-10700K). Provided they're sold at slightly lower prices, the lack of an iGPU doesn't affect target buyers of these chips - PC gamers or creative professionals who use graphics cards and don't need an iGPU. Competing Ryzen processors lack iGPUs by design. Intel is expected to debut its 10th generation Core "Comet Lake-S" processors in April.
Sources: InformaticaCero, VideoCardz
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14 Comments on Intel 10th Gen Core "Comet Lake-S" IGP-Disabled Processor Lineup Detailed

#1
GlacierNine
I'm pressing X to doubt until we get this information from a less suspicious source. That slide just SCREAMS fabricated to me, with the way it's obviously been blurred/messed with to make sure the letters are legible but the fonts aren't too recognisable.

The site itself also bought into the "RX 3080 will arrive in 2019" rumour, and various other bits of poorly sourced bullshit.
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#2
ShurikN
If the pricing is good (and this info correct), that locked i9 could be a solid performer.
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#3
theoneandonlymrk
Well seems like a reasonable way to reduce power use, hopefully they will price these competitively.
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#4
TheLostSwede
The poll kind of asks the wrong question.
It's not a matter of needing the iGPU as such, but it's a handy feature if it doesn't cost anything extra. However, as this is Intel, nothing is free...
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#5
efikkan
The integrated GPU is there because OEMs expect it. But it's wasted die space for most PC builders; "nobody" buys a K-SKU to use integrated graphics.

I'm looking forward to future generations where the graphics may be a separate die, so they can simply skip it for most models.

The argument of a "backup GPU" is a fairly weak one; to waste ~30% die space just in case your GPU dies? By that reason we should have spare hardware for everything. Most PC builders have a stash of old hardware anyway, and keeping graphics cards as spares is probably one of the most easy things to do; a 10 year old GPU will still fit in there, while old CPUs, RAM, motherboards etc. wouldn't.
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#6
freeagent
The onboard comes in handy for diagnostics, but outside of that I don’t use it.
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#8
Beastie
theoneandonlymrk
Well seems like a reasonable way to reduce power use, hopefully they will price these competitively.
Would an otherwise identical chip with IGP use more power if the IGP is unused?
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#9
TheUn4seen
efikkan
The integrated GPU is there because OEMs expect it. But it's wasted die space for most PC builders; "nobody" buys a K-SKU to use integrated graphics.
Well, I do. I have two 9700k machines, of which one has a dedicated GPU and an 9600k - wife's PC. I use the "k" CPUs because of higher base clocks, and I don't even overclock them besides maxing boost limits so they keep maximum frequencies indefinitely. Two of the three machines use iGPUs exclusively, and I know a few other grown-ups who don't play games but need or want some nice CPU horsepower.

Personally I wouldn't buy a CPU with no iGPU because, in a few years, I might want to repurpose the machine as a home server (NAS, CCTV recorder and such, I did exactly that with the 6700k), PC for my mother or what have you. I like to keep my options open and the iGPU doesnt seem to waste a lot of power when not in use.
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#10
TheLostSwede
Beastie
Would an otherwise identical chip with IGP use more power if the IGP is unused?
Possibly, but it would be fairly marginal. As long as that part of the chip is enabled, there's a current going through it. I guess it would draw very little power if disabled in the UEFI, but I haven't actually measured it. If enabled, but unused, it's likely to use a bit more power, since it needs to be "available" so to speak.
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#11
voltage
ShurikN
If the pricing is good (and this info correct), that locked i9 could be a solid performer.
what I was thinking as well.
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#12
Darmok N Jalad
theoneandonlymrk
Well seems like a reasonable way to reduce power use, hopefully they will price these competitively.
The thing is, they are raising power consumption on the 10 series vs 9 series. What used to be 95W SKUs are moving up to 125W.
efikkan
The integrated GPU is there because OEMs expect it. But it's wasted die space for most PC builders; "nobody" buys a K-SKU to use integrated graphics.

I'm looking forward to future generations where the graphics may be a separate die, so they can simply skip it for most models.

The argument of a "backup GPU" is a fairly weak one; to waste ~30% die space just in case your GPU dies? By that reason we should have spare hardware for everything. Most PC builders have a stash of old hardware anyway, and keeping graphics cards as spares is probably one of the most easy things to do; a 10 year old GPU will still fit in there, while old CPUs, RAM, motherboards etc. wouldn't.
I don’t know about nobody, but if you don’t need a fast GPU but still want the best CPU, then these are the ticket (for Intel). Apple employs K-series CPUs, and I believe they still leverage the iGPU for certain tasks, even if a dedicated GPU is also present.
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#13
theoneandonlymrk
Darmok N Jalad
The thing is, they are raising power consumption on the 10 series vs 9 series. What used to be 95W SKUs are moving up to 125W.

I don’t know about nobody, but if you don’t need a fast GPU but still want the best CPU, then these are the ticket (for Intel). Apple employs K-series CPUs, and I believe they still leverage the iGPU for certain tasks, even if a dedicated GPU is also present.
well if the 10 series is MCM as believed, them not having to produce that many (possibly unable to produce That many) Gpu's would also relieve supply strain on Xe which it would seem(to me likely) one tile of which Could be the GPU in the 10 series that do have a IGPU, if that is the case(using Xe tiles in 10 series) then recent reports of Xe being an inefficient chip would align but regardless Xe will be similar to 10 series GPU, both not great with power.

You don't put a 15-75Watt GPU next to a 65-125 watt CPU and not have more heat or without effectively controlling the power use of both.

As for raising the power limit, They already Beta tested that with the 9900K And KF/ special edition, people will indeed buy an inefficient design if they just want Ghz, so why not adopt that ideology across the range, more watts, no one will notice its not like that ever stopped a sale?.

Indeed , Video encode decode and some other use cases should suffer.
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#14
gamefoo21
efikkan
The integrated GPU is there because OEMs expect it. But it's wasted die space for most PC builders; "nobody" buys a K-SKU to use integrated graphics.

I'm looking forward to future generations where the graphics may be a separate die, so they can simply skip it for most models.

The argument of a "backup GPU" is a fairly weak one; to waste ~30% die space just in case your GPU dies? By that reason we should have spare hardware for everything. Most PC builders have a stash of old hardware anyway, and keeping graphics cards as spares is probably one of the most easy things to do; a 10 year old GPU will still fit in there, while old CPUs, RAM, motherboards etc. wouldn't.
Glad to hear you speak for everyone.

I have K series, I use the iGPU for OpenCL tasks, as well as a low power display driver.

I know a few people who use the Quicksync functionality that's part of the iGPU on Intel.

Oh wait, even myself means 'somebody' does. ;)
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