Tuesday, March 3rd 2020

EIZO Releases World's First True HDR Reference Monitor with Built-In Calibration Sensor for Professional Color Grading

EIZO Corporation today announced the release of the ColorEdge PROMINENCE CG3146, a 31.1-inch, DCI-4K (4096 x 2160) HDR (high dynamic range) reference monitor for the professional post production and color grading workflow. It is the successor model to EIZO's flagship HDR reference monitor, the ColorEdge PROMINENCE CG3145, and is the first to incorporate a built-in calibration sensor.

Like its predecessor, the ColorEdge PROMINENCE CG3146 correctly shows both very bright and very dark areas on the screen without sacrificing the integrity of either - a process which cannot be achieved with SDR (standard dynamic range) monitors. The monitor achieves 1000 cd/m^2 (typical) high brightness and 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio for true HDR display.

The ColorEdge PROMINENCE CG3146 adds to its predecessor's impressive resume by being the world's first true HDR reference monitor to incorporate a built-in calibration sensor. EIZO utilized its extensive experience in hardware calibration solutions to integrate its unique calibration technology into its now highest spec HDR model. Hardware calibration ensures the screen stays color accurate over time and streamlines color management, so users can stay more focused on the creative process.

Furthermore, with EIZO's ColorNavigator 7 color management software, users can regularly calibrate and quality control their monitor quickly and reliably. Users can calibrate all color modes simultaneously, setup regular recalibration intervals, and maintain quality control in multi-monitor environments, all with a single software application.

ColorEdge PROMINENCE are the first HDR reference monitors to overcome the severe drawbacks of other HDR technologies available to the market - ABL (Auto Brightness Limiter) and local dimming. They achieve a true HDR visual experience without the limitations of these technologies to ensure users always see accurate colors and brightness in every pixel.

The ColorEdge PROMINENCE CG3146 supports HLG (hybrid log-gamma) and the PQ (perceptual quantization) curve for displaying and editing broadcast, film, and other video content in HDR. The optimized gamma curves render images to appear truer to how the human eye perceives the real world compared to SDR (standard dynamic range).

The color and brightness of an LCD monitor can shift due to changes in ambient temperature and the temperature of the monitor itself. The ColorEdge PROMINENCE CG3146 is equipped with a temperature sensor for accurately measuring the temperature inside the monitor, as well as estimating the temperature of the surrounding environment. With this temperature sensing and estimation technology, the monitor adjusts in real time, so gradations, color, brightness, and other characteristics continue to be displayed accurately. Furthermore, EIZO uses AI (artificial intelligence) in the estimation algorithm of the monitor so it can distinguish between various temperature changing patterns to calculate even more accurate correction. EIZO's patented digital uniformity equalizer (DUE) technology also counterbalances the influences that a fluctuating temperature may have on color temperature and brightness for stable image display across the screen.

Additional Features
  • Single-Link 12G/6G/3G/HD-SDI and Dual- or Quad-Link 3G/HD-SDI
  • VPID support for SDI connections
  • HDMI and DisplayPort inputs
  • 99% reproduction of DCI-P3
  • 3D LUT for individual color adjustment on an RGB cubic table
  • 10-bit simultaneous display from a 24-bit LUT for smooth color gradations
  • Quick adjustment of monitor settings via front bezel dial
  • Light-shielding hood included
  • 5-year manufacturer's warranty
EIZO will be showing the ColorEdge PROMINENCE CG3146 for the first time at NAB 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA from April 19 to 22. Visit South Hall Lower, Booth SL10010 to see a live demo.

Availability
The ColorEdge PROMINENCE CG3146 will begin shipping in April 2020. Date of availability varies by country so contact the EIZO group company or distributor in your country for details.
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20 Comments on EIZO Releases World's First True HDR Reference Monitor with Built-In Calibration Sensor for Professional Color Grading

#2
Chomiq
Wonder if it uses dual layer setup like the ones from Sony and Panasonic.
Posted on Reply
#3
bug
That's what I'd like to have on my desk. But it will cost as much as a car.

Also, I wonder what overcoming the shortcoming of local dimming means.
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#4
Chomiq
bug
Also, I wonder what overcoming the shortcoming of local dimming means.
Basically that's what I mentioned in my post. If this indeed uses Panasonic panel it will be pixel accurate, with no haloing whatsoever.
This basically matches OLED when it comes to black levels and surpasses it when it comes to brightness.
Posted on Reply
#5
bug
Chomiq
Basically that's what I mentioned in my post. If this indeed uses Panasonic panel it will be pixel accurate, with no haloing whatsoever.
This basically matches OLED and surpasses it when it comes to brightness level.
It's probably not good news for power draw and, possibly, viewing angles.
I wish someone figured out Quantum Dot for consumers. It would basically be OLED without the drawbacks. But I'm not holding my breath, these day barely anyone talks about the tech anymore.
Posted on Reply
#6
Chomiq
bug
It's probably not good news for power draw and, possibly, viewing angles.
It's a reference monitor for studio mastering. As for viewing angle, it's an IPS panel so no problems there. Beside, you won't be viewing it off angle from x meters away. Nobody cares about power draw, it must be able to provide 1000 nitt. Same as Dolby Vision reference display must be able to reach 4000 nitt.

Similar to this:
Posted on Reply
#7
bug
Chomiq
It's a reference monitor for studio mastering. As for viewing angle, it's an IPS panel so no problems there. Beside, you won't be viewing it off angle from x meters away. Nobody cares about power draw, it must be able to provide 1000 nitt. Same as Dolby Vision reference display must be able to reach 4000 nitt.

Similar to this:

Well, yes, I realize that would be perfectly fine for pro usage. But since I won't buy into that, I was just looking at the tech from a consumer's point of view.
Posted on Reply
#8
Chomiq
bug
Well, yes, I realize that would be perfectly fine for pro usage. But since I won't buy into that, I was just looking at the tech from a consumer's point of view.
One thing that comes close to this is micro led but it's heavily limited by number of zones and dimming speed. TCL sells their TVs in US and EU but you can still notice blooming on dark scenes.
Apple tried to deliver something similar to dual layer but from what I heard it's not that great.
Posted on Reply
#9
bug
Chomiq
One thing that comes close to this is micro led but it's heavily limited by number of zones and dimming speed. TCL sells their TVs in US and EU but you can still notice blooming on dark scenes.
Apple tried to deliver something similar to dual layer but from what I heard it's not that great.

And now I remembered about Samsung's XL20(?). Didn't pan out as planned :(
Posted on Reply
#10
medi01
Why can LG sell 55" OLED TVs for about 1k, but can't roll out 24-28"-ish screens for $500 or so?
Posted on Reply
#11
jmcslob
I bet this will be bested by a $400 gaming monitor within 5 years...
But if you need something like this for work none of that matters....You pay whatever you need to.
Full HDR10...I wanna see it.
Posted on Reply
#12
bug
medi01
Why can LG sell 55" OLED TVs for about 1k, but can't roll out 24-28"-ish screens for $500 or so?
For the same reason they don't sell 40" OLED panels at all: they can't make OLEDs that small without your choice of tiny lifespan or breaking the bank.
Posted on Reply
#13
danbert2000
medi01
Why can LG sell 55" OLED TVs for about 1k, but can't roll out 24-28"-ish screens for $500 or so?
Smaller screens require more pixel density or lower resolution. For an LCD screen, this isn't much of a problem. However, for a TV, this adds complexity. Especially with OLED screens putting out quite a bit of heat per pixel. I don't doubt they could do it, but it would likely be more expensive than you would want. Also, OLED is pretty bad for computers. The uneven pixel wear in a desktop environment will make obvious burn in over a short period of time. LCD with LED local dimming is much more preferable for screens that will see static elements regularly.
Posted on Reply
#14
bug
danbert2000
Smaller screens require more pixel density or lower resolution. For an LCD screen, this isn't much of a problem. However, for a TV, this adds complexity. Especially with OLED screens putting out quite a bit of heat per pixel. I don't doubt they could do it, but it would likely be more expensive than you would want. Also, OLED is pretty bad for computers. The uneven pixel wear in a desktop environment will make obvious burn in over a short period of time. LCD with LED local dimming is much more preferable for screens that will see static elements regularly.
Seeing how poorly local dimming is done on monitors, you'd be better off paying for a new OLED monitor every 3-5 years :D
I mean, mini-LED is very expensive and it only does ~1,000 dimming zones. At 4k resolution, that's 8,000 pixels per zone, it's still going to halo from time to time. And I've seen monitors having 6(!) dimming zones. Totally useless for the buyer, but it will net you that DisplayHDR certification because now you meet the contrast ratio requirement.
Posted on Reply
#15
medi01
danbert2000
Especially with OLED screens putting out quite a bit of heat per pixel
Uh, even actual TVs are putting out less heat than, say, Samsung's TFT QLED, when you sit next to it, brightness would be even lower.

In my humble opinion, both 1440p and 1080p OLED monitors for about $500 would be viable.
Posted on Reply
#16
bug
medi01
Uh, even actual TVs are putting out less heat than, say, Samsung's TFT QLED, when you sit next to it, brightness would be even lower.

In my humble opinion, both 1440p and 1080p OLED monitors for about $500 would be viable.
So why can't you buy them? Do the manufacturers avoid making $$$?
Posted on Reply
#17
RoutedScripter
and is the first to incorporate a built-in calibration sensor
Wooow! That's a step in the right direction, holy smokes!!!

The days of monitor miscalibration saga finally seeing the light at the end of the tunnel !?!?!?!?

Still this is just the veeery beginning, they want to get to 10k nits for true HDR, so this is really not true HDR, and there's no mention of WCG and the higher Rec. 2100 gamut. (succ. Rec. 2020)

The emerging DCI-P3 gamut is kinda another thing they pushed in to stretch out the whole journey to real HDR and WCG (cow milking). DCI-P3 does not specify any increases in the blue side of the gamut triangle almost at all, the purple and cyan areas also get a relatively small amount.

DCI-P3



sRGB vs DCI-P3





ITU-R Rec. BT.2020 / Rec. RT.2100
Posted on Reply
#19
danbert2000
bug
Seeing how poorly local dimming is done on monitors, you'd be better off paying for a new OLED monitor every 3-5 years :D
I mean, mini-LED is very expensive and it only does ~1,000 dimming zones. At 4k resolution, that's 8,000 pixels per zone, it's still going to halo from time to time. And I've seen monitors having 6(!) dimming zones. Totally useless for the buyer, but it will net you that DisplayHDR certification because now you meet the contrast ratio requirement.
I have a backlit TV with 100 zones and it is generally pretty acceptable as long as the base LCD layer has decent contrast on its own. Vizio puts 6000:1 screens in their TVs with local dimming, and at that point the bloom isn't too bad. It's a lot down to the algorithm too. Really agressive algorithms will trade blooming for peak brightness levels. Vizio generally does a middle of the road approach, where overall brightness of the scene informs whether or not to crank the backlight up all the way. Clearly a TV is generally more forgiving. I hope monitors get up to at least 3000 or more.
Posted on Reply
#20
bug
danbert2000
I have a backlit TV with 100 zones and it is generally pretty acceptable as long as the base LCD layer has decent contrast on its own. Vizio puts 6000:1 screens in their TVs with local dimming, and at that point the bloom isn't too bad. It's a lot down to the algorithm too. Really agressive algorithms will trade blooming for peak brightness levels. Vizio generally does a middle of the road approach, where overall brightness of the scene informs whether or not to crank the backlight up all the way. Clearly a TV is generally more forgiving. I hope monitors get up to at least 3000 or more.
We're talking monitors, you're talking TVs. Not the same thing.
Equipment for consumption (TVs) can get away with much more than equipment for mastering (monitors).
Posted on Reply
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