Thursday, March 5th 2020

In Win Intros SR24 AIO CPU Cooler with Twin Turbine Pump

In Win today rolled out the SR24, an all-in-one liquid CPU cooler featuring a patented "twin turbine pump" feature. These are basically two pump turbines attached on both ends of the DC motor's shaft, which in turn are located on either ends of the CPU block. One of the turbine pushes coolant into the block, while the other pulls heated coolant from it. In Win claims that even if one of the two fails over time, the other will provide sufficient coolant pressure to cool your CPU, while a warning LED lights up. With both turbines operational, the SR24 offers double the coolant pressure, and a markedly superior P-Q curve. The pump block is capped off with an RGB illuminated In Win logo.

The innovative pump-block of the In Win SR24 is tubed to a 240 mm x 120 mm aluminium radiator. Ventilating it are a pair of included In Win Jupiter 120 mm fans that each spin at speeds of 500 to 2,500 RPM, with up to 101.5 CFM of air-flow, and as low as 23 dBA of noise output. The fans feature double ball bearings and feature addressable RGB LEDs in their hubs. A single 3-pin ARGB connection handles lighting for the two fans and the pump-block. The company didn't mention thermal load numbers, but among the CPU socket types supported are TR4, sTRX4, LGA2066, AM4, and LGA115x. The company didn't reveal pricing.
Add your own comment

20 Comments on In Win Intros SR24 AIO CPU Cooler with Twin Turbine Pump

#1
bogami
If they make a good rotor, with snail (funnel), we would have a pamp beyond the results of both these pumps! I suggest taking a look at how the rotors and pump housings of today's rocket motors are made, and study the behavior of liquids (to compare and see the difference between the aquarium pump and the pump). Good idea poor performance .
Posted on Reply
#3
gamefoo21
I hate to be a downer but there's a big issue with one of their claims...

As both rotors are tied to the same shaft, the same motor, the chances of only one 'pump' or side failing is stupidly small. If the rotor breaks apart, you'll likely have a catastrophic failure as the bits plug the system.

Though the gains from running push-pull are well documented. It's actually how I tend to arrange the pumps in my loops. One pushes from the reservoir into the components, the other pulls from the components and pushes into the radiators, feeding back into the first pump.

I guess a simpler comparison is fan orientation on radiators. Push-pull gets a decent bump in performance compared to push only.
Posted on Reply
#5
Animalpak
Speeding the water to crush the waterblock fins may can help to cool down a bit, like 2-3 degrees.

Aesthetically not very pleasant but the target here is the performance and i would prefer to see it with a bigger radiator to really make difference compared other AIO's.
Posted on Reply
#6
Valantar
gamefoo21
I hate to be a downer but there's a big issue with one of their claims...

As both rotors are tied to the same shaft, the same motor, the chances of only one 'pump' or side failing is stupidly small. If the rotor breaks apart, you'll likely have a catastrophic failure as the bits plug the system.

Though the gains from running push-pull are well documented. It's actually how I tend to arrange the pumps in my loops. One pushes from the reservoir into the components, the other pulls from the components and pushes into the radiators, feeding back into the first pump.

I guess a simpler comparison is fan orientation on radiators. Push-pull gets a decent bump in performance compared to push only.
Are they tied to the same shaft though? There looks like there's some sort of shaft in the middle, but it seems very odd for there to be one given that both impellers face inwards - a shaft there would in essence mean that there's a leak between the two, lowering pressure and causing turbulence. I don't know what that little shiny thing in the middle is, but I would be very surprised if it was a shaft connecting the two impellers. From looking at the diagram, each impeller is entirely separate, with separate housings and motors.

I would seriously wonder about the efficacy of such a setup in a low-resistance system like a single-rad, single-block AIO, though.
Posted on Reply
#7
ZoneDymo
madness777
VTEC AIOs coming soon :rockout:
Rotary with a Turbo son, and some NOS
Posted on Reply
#8
Object55
One tube at the top, one at the bottom. No, just one. My OCD can't take that mess in a case.
Posted on Reply
#9
thesmokingman
Wow, look at the mess of parts that make up that pump.
Posted on Reply
#10
John Naylor
Iffy .. several dubious claims here:

1. If one rotor jams, how does the shaft continue to rotate ? If the rotor shears off the shaft, it leaves the stationary rotor inn the flow path which will cause a significant flow restriction.

2. Double the coolant pressure ? Compared to what ? If Corsair claimed that it's new CLC proviuded double the water flow ... as they are now 0.11 gpm, double would mean 0.22. still inadequate for a properly designed coolant system. A dr would deliver 1.0 gpm +

3. Markedly superior curver ? Again, compared to what ? In an electric car, is two 50 HP motors better than a 200 HP motor ?

4. Aluminum radiator ? Well at least it provides a science project, you can do "galvanic corrosion" for your school science fair.

5. 2500 rpm is quite noisy, not choice really with aluminum rads. Leaves it a bit weak on the low speed control
Posted on Reply
#11
kapone32
If the price is right I will get one of these to test and see what happens
Posted on Reply
#13
gasolina
Coming from inwin, i expect it to be 200$. In win products are good but the price is too over the moon
Posted on Reply
#14
gamefoo21
Valantar
Are they tied to the same shaft though? There looks like there's some sort of shaft in the middle, but it seems very odd for there to be one given that both impellers face inwards - a shaft there would in essence mean that there's a leak between the two, lowering pressure and causing turbulence. I don't know what that little shiny thing in the middle is, but I would be very surprised if it was a shaft connecting the two impellers. From looking at the diagram, each impeller is entirely separate, with separate housings and motors.

I would seriously wonder about the efficacy of such a setup in a low-resistance system like a single-rad, single-block AIO, though.
It all depends if it uses pumps like the DDC or Swiftech 50X. If it's a bearing with a sealed magnetic sections to whirl the pumps. I wonder if it's using two actual motors.

The wear point is still the bearings, expect similar life span, you might see a few days of extra life on the one pump.

I am excited to see one of these torn down.
Posted on Reply
#15
thesmokingman
Lmao, the advertising images are wrong? They call it "runs parallel" with each other but the flow is actually series.
Posted on Reply
#16
Totally
gamefoo21
I hate to be a downer but there's a big issue with one of their claims...

As both rotors are tied to the same shaft, the same motor, the chances of only one 'pump' or side failing is stupidly small. If the rotor breaks apart, you'll likely have a catastrophic failure as the bits plug the system.
That is statistically unlikely i.e. never happen. Impeller with integrated rotor is made out of ceramic or plastic for it to fail as you describe it have to a) encounter a severe enough physical shock b) spin to the point where ther material can no longer maintain it's integrity
Posted on Reply
#17
gamefoo21
Totally
That is statistically unlikely i.e. never happen. Impeller with integrated rotor is made out of ceramic or plastic for it to fail as you describe it have to a) encounter a severe enough physical shock b) spin to the point where ther material can no longer maintain it's integrity
I was pointing out how unlikely it is for one to fail and for both to not go boom at or basically at the same time. Actually the pump closest to CPU cooking first. Heh
Posted on Reply
#18
Totally
gamefoo21
I was pointing out how unlikely it is for one to fail and for both to not go boom at or basically at the same time. Actually the pump closest to CPU cooking first. Heh
And I was saying they can't and won't fail that way you speak of. The more realistic failure and what they're referring is a failure of an electrical component killing a pump. One side dies but both impellers will keep spinning because of a common shaft. And both pumps are the same distance from from the CPU unless you're referring to them as the hot leg pump and cold leg pump but also doesn't bearing on failure since the circuitry doesn't come into contact with the coolant.
Valantar
Are they tied to the same shaft though? There looks like there's some sort of shaft in the middle, but it seems very odd for there to be one given that both impellers face inwards - a shaft there would in essence mean that there's a leak between the two, lowering pressure and causing turbulence. I don't know what that little shiny thing in the middle is, but I would be very surprised if it was a shaft connecting the two impellers. From looking at the diagram, each impeller is entirely separate, with separate housings and motors.

I would seriously wonder about the efficacy of such a setup in a low-resistance system like a single-rad, single-block AIO, though.
The impellers mirror one another. Crossflow is going to be negligible.
Posted on Reply
#19
Khonjel
madness777
VTEC AIOs coming soon :rockout:
ZoneDymo
Rotary with a Turbo son, and some NOS
I just came back from r/cars and I had to legit check if this was TPU or not after reading the title.

BTW I'll really miss engine sounds when EVs take over.
Posted on Reply
#20
thesmokingman
Khonjel
I just came back from r/cars and I had to legit check if this was TPU or not after reading the title.

BTW I'll really miss engine sounds when EVs take over.
No problem mate! :rockout:

Posted on Reply
Add your own comment