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ASUS Sneaks Out ROG Strix TRX40-XE Gaming Motherboard

ASUS silently updated its socket sTRX4 motherboard lineup with the ROG Strix TRX40-XE Gaming. Whispers of this board along with a "Prime TRX40 PRO-S" model date back to February, when a Hardware Info report described them as near-identical successors of the ROG Strix TRX40-E Gaming and Prime TRX40-PRO, with upgraded CPU VRM setups, as ASUS probably felt the two needed an improved VRM to cope with the rigors of a 64-core/128-thread Ryzen Threadripper 3990X processor, particularly overclocking it.

The company had already upgraded its flagship ROG Zenith II Extreme to the beefed-up Zenith II Extreme Alpha. The ROG Strix TRX40-XE Gaming is identical to the original ROG Strix TRX40-E Gaming, right until you pop open its VRM heatsink. ASUS is using beefier 70 A phases with the XE, carried over from the original ROG Zenith II Extreme. The Extreme Alpha which now tops the lineup, uses even stronger 90 A power stages. The original ROG Strix TRX40-E Gaming still very much does support the Threadripper 3990X, including overclocking it, though not as well as the ROG Strix TRX40-XE Gaming. The Prime TRX40 PRO-S remains elusive. ASUS is pricing the ROG Strix TRX40-XE Gaming at USD $549.
ASUS ROG Strix TRX40-XE Gaming

Distant Blips on the AMD Roadmap Surface: Rembrandt and Raphael

Several future AMD processor codenames across various computing segments surfaced courtesy of an Expreview leak that's largely aligned with information from Komachi Ensaka. It does not account for "Matisse Refresh" that's allegedly coming out in June-July as three gaming-focused Ryzen socket AM4 desktop processors; but roadmap from 2H-2020 going up to 2022 sees many codenames surface. To begin with, the second half of 2020 promises to be as action packed as last year's 7/7 mega launch. Over in the graphics business, the company is expected to debut its DirectX 12 Ultimate-compliant RDNA2 client graphics, and its first CDNA architecture-based compute accelerators. Much of the processor launch cycle is based around the new "Zen 3" microarchitecture.

The server platform debuting in the second half of 2020 is codenamed "Genesis SP3." This will be the final processor architecture for the SP3-class enterprise sockets, as it has DDR4 and PCI-Express gen 4.0 I/O. The EPYC server processor is codenamed "Milan," and combines "Zen 3" chiplets along with an sIOD. EPYC Embedded (FP6 package) processors are codenamed "Grey Hawk."

Bitspower Unveils Summit ELX CPU Water Block for AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3000

Bitspower unveiled the Summit ELX line of CPU water blocks optimized for 3rd generation AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors. The block's coolant channel is designed keeping in mind the layout of the "Castle Peak" MCM, such that coolant flows over even the CCDs farthest away from the center, which has the I/O controller die. This design should particularly benefit users of the Threadripper 3990X, which has eight CCDs. The block supports both sTRX4 and older TR4 sockets.

The primary material is nickel-plated copper, with a mirror finish at the base. There are three variants based on the type of top. The first one called "DRGB," (BP-CPUELXTRX40-DRGB), features a clear acrylic top with embedded addressable-RGB LEDs that plug into a standard 3-pin ARGB header. The second variant is called "Metal" (BP-CPUELXTRX40-MT), and features a metal alloy top with a chrome finish. The third variant, called "POM," (BP-CPUELXTRX40-POM), features a matte-black POM acetal top. The Summit ELX supports standard G 1/4" fittings, and measures 115 mm x 75 mm x 18 mm (LxWxH). The DRGB variant is priced at NTD 2,800, the Metal variant NTD 3,255, and the POM variant NTD 2,635.

EK Unveils EK-Quantum Momentum TRX40 Aorus Master D-RGB Monoblock

EK Water Blocks, the European premium computer liquid cooling gear manufacturer, unveiled another sTRX4-based monoblock made for TRX40 AORUS MASTER motherboard. This time, during the development of the monoblock, EK's engineering team went for a more elaborate approach, which can be seen from the shape of the monoblock. This is a complete all-in-one (CPU and motherboard) liquid cooling solution for the Aorus motherboard that is based on AMD TRX40 chipset for AMD Ryzen 3rd generation Threadripper processors.

In Win Intros SR24 AIO CPU Cooler with Twin Turbine Pump

In Win today rolled out the SR24, an all-in-one liquid CPU cooler featuring a patented "twin turbine pump" feature. These are basically two pump turbines attached on both ends of the DC motor's shaft, which in turn are located on either ends of the CPU block. One of the turbine pushes coolant into the block, while the other pulls heated coolant from it. In Win claims that even if one of the two fails over time, the other will provide sufficient coolant pressure to cool your CPU, while a warning LED lights up. With both turbines operational, the SR24 offers double the coolant pressure, and a markedly superior P-Q curve. The pump block is capped off with an RGB illuminated In Win logo.

The innovative pump-block of the In Win SR24 is tubed to a 240 mm x 120 mm aluminium radiator. Ventilating it are a pair of included In Win Jupiter 120 mm fans that each spin at speeds of 500 to 2,500 RPM, with up to 101.5 CFM of air-flow, and as low as 23 dBA of noise output. The fans feature double ball bearings and feature addressable RGB LEDs in their hubs. A single 3-pin ARGB connection handles lighting for the two fans and the pump-block. The company didn't mention thermal load numbers, but among the CPU socket types supported are TR4, sTRX4, LGA2066, AM4, and LGA115x. The company didn't reveal pricing.

ID-Cooling Rolls Out Zoomflow 360X Snow AIO Liquid CPU Cooler

ID-Cooling today updated its Zoomflow line of all-in-one liquid CPU cooler series with the new Zoomflow 360X Snow. As with most PC hardware names that use the term "snow," the 360X Snow is a white trim of the Zoomflow 360. White dominates the pump-block's body, the nylon sleeve around the tubing, the radiator (including its fins), and the three included fans. ID-Cooling claims the cooler is capable of handling thermal loads of up to 350 W thanks to its high coolant pressure and large 360 mm x 120 mm radiator.

The three included 120 mm hydraulic-bearing fans each spin at speeds ranging between 700 to 1,500 RPM, pushing up to 62 CFM of air, with noise output ranging between 18 to 26.4 dBA. A single 3-pin ARGB connection from the motherboard lights up the three fans and the RGB ornament on the pump-block. Among the CPU socket types supported are AMD TR4, sTRX4, and AM4; and Intel LGA2066 and LGA115x. The company didn't reveal pricing, although we expect it to be priced around the $130-mark.

AMD Gives Itself Massive Cost-cutting Headroom with the Chiplet Design

At its 2020 IEEE ISSCC keynote, AMD presented two slides that detail the extent of cost savings yielded by its bold decision to embrace the MCM (multi-chip module) approach to not just its enterprise and HEDT processors, but also its mainstream desktop ones. By confining only those components that tangibly benefit from cutting-edge silicon fabrication processes, namely the CPU cores, while letting other components sit on relatively inexpensive 12 nm, AMD is able to maximize its 7 nm foundry allocation, by making it produce small 8-core CCDs (CPU complex dies), which add up to AMD's target core-counts. With this approach, AMD is able to cram up to 16 cores onto its AM4 desktop socket using two chiplets, and up to 64 cores using eight chiplets on its SP3r3 and sTRX4 sockets.

In the slides below, AMD compares the cost of its current 7 nm + 12 nm MCM approach to a hypothetical monolithic die it would have had to build on 7 nm (including the I/O components). The slides suggest that the cost of a single-chiplet "Matisse" MCM (eg: Ryzen 7 3700X) is about 40% less than that of the double-chiplet "Matisse" (eg: Ryzen 9 3950X). Had AMD opted to build a monolithic 7 nm die that had 8 cores and all the I/O components of the I/O die, such a die would cost roughly 50% more than the current 1x CCD + IOD solution. On the other hand, a monolithic 7 nm die with 16 cores and I/O components would cost 125% more. AMD hence enjoys a massive headroom for cost-cutting. Prices of the flagship 3950X can be close to halved (from its current $749 MSRP), and AMD can turn up the heat on Intel's upcoming Core i9-10900K by significantly lowering price of its 12-core 3900X from its current $499 MSRP. The company will also enjoy more price-cutting headroom for its 6-core Ryzen 5 SKUs than it did with previous-generation Ryzen 5 parts based on monolithic dies.

be quiet! Announces Shadow Rock 3 CPU Cooler

be quiet!, the market leader in PC power supplies in Germany since 2007, announces Shadow Rock 3. This addition to the mid-range CPU cooler lineup of be quiet! features a redesigned heat sink and heat pipe layout and a Shadow Rock 2 fan to increase the rated cooling capacity to 190 W TDP while its asymmetrical design improves compatibility with tall RAM modules.

Compared to its predecessor, Shadow Rock 3 has undergone a substantial redesign. The previous model relied on four 8 mm heat pipes to cool the CPU, while Shadow Rock 3 now implements five 6 mm heat pipes with heat pipe direct touch (HDT) technology. The heat pipes are in direct contact with the processor surface, which results in fast heat transfer from the CPU to the heat sink. The fan has been upgraded to a Shadow Wings 2 120 mm PWM high-speed, which is decoupled from the heatsink and offers a silent operation at no higher than 24.4 dB(A), even at maximum speed. Users who are looking for even higher cooling performance have the option to attach a second fan to the heatsink.

ASUS Unveils ROG Zenith II Extreme Alpha Motherboard: Improved CPU VRM

ASUS updated its AMD socket sTRX4 motherboard series with the new ROG Zenith II Extreme Alpha, a slight step-up from the original ROG Zenith II Extreme that debuted with AMD's 3rd gen Ryzen Threadripper family. Although ASUS' entire sTRX4 motherboard lineup will support the upcoming 64-core Threadripper 3990X, the new Extreme Alpha is better designed for overclocking it. The new board looks visually identical to the original ROG Zenith II Extreme, and has an almost-identical feature-set, with the only difference being the CPU VRM solution. The new ROG Zenith II Extreme Alpha implements a 16-phase CPU VRM with Infineon TDA21490 power-stages replacing the TDA21472 power-stages on the original ROG Zenith II Extreme (possibly increase output current or I-out from 70 A to 90 A). This could marginally increase the product price. The rest of the feature-set is identical.

Cooler Master MasterLiquid ML360P Silver Edition Pictured

Cooler Master updated the MasterLiquid ML360P premium AIO liquid CPU cooler with a new Silver Edition variant that sees a silver-gray color-scheme dominate the radiator, tubing sleeves, and the pump-block. Rather than including three 120 mm fans, Cooler Master packs a 3x 120 mm compound-fan. ARGB LED illumination dominate the three fans and subtle lighting accents on the pump-block. You can use a single 3-pin ARGB connection to control lighting of the entire cooler, or use the included LED controller that lets you customize color, and cycle between lighting presets.

Each of the three 120 mm fan subunit spins at speeds of up to 1,800 RPM, pushing up to 45 CFM of air, with noise output ranging between 8 to 30 dBA. The cold-plate is made of copper, and the radiator aluminium. The MasterLiquid ML360P supports nearly all modern CPU socket types, including AM4, LGA115x, LGA2066, TR4, and sTRX4. For Threadripper sockets, you need to use the round AIO retention module AMD includes in the box of all retail Threadripper processors. The company didn't reveal pricing.

EK Water Blocks Announces sTRX4 Compatibility with EK Velocity sTR4 Series Blocks

The EK Velocity sTR4 series water blocks that are specifically designed for HEDT AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors are compatible with all newly released AMD TRX40 based motherboards equipped with socket sTRX4 which supports Ryzen Threadripper 3000 Series Processors.

With the release of 32 core count HEDT computer processors and potential for even more cores, the requirement for the top of the line cooling has never been bigger. The sTR4 Lineup of EK-Velocity water blocks, designed for the sTR4 socket, is perfectly compatible with the newly released AMD TRX40 motherboards that are using the sTRX4 socket. The only difference between the sTR4 and sTRX40 sockets is the pin layout, thus it has no effect on the cooling performance or the mounting itself.
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