Thursday, April 9th 2020

EVGA Introduces the GeForce RTX 2080 & 2070 SUPER KO Graphics Cards

EVGA today announced availability of their GeForce RTX 2080 & 2070 SUPER KO graphics cards. Much like their original RTX 2060 KO graphics card, which came in an attractive price point that undercut NVIDIA's own $299 MSRP for the graphics card, the new graphics cards also carry a new, lower price point than the company's (previous) cheapest offerings, the Black series. The EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER KO will be retailing for $499.99 (2560 CUDA cores, 1770 MHz Boost Clock, 8 GB GDDR6 memory @ 14 GHz over a 256-bit bus), while the EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER KO (3072 CUDA cores, 1815 MHz Boost Clock, 8 GB GDDR6 memory @ 15.5 GHz over a 256-bit bus) can be had for $699.99. This is a lower pricing than most competitor's offerings in this market for a custom-designed RTX 2070 SUPER or RTX 2080 SUPER.

To achieve this pricepoint, some cuts have had to be made. The cards ship without a backplate, and the cooling solution seems to be slightly less dense than the company's other, more expensive designs based on NVIDIA's chips. The PCB in these graphics cards is a custom design - and going to the trouble of redesigning what was an originally beefy engineering feat means that some cuts were likely done in this area as well. The new SUPER KO graphics cards also drop the Virtual Link port, featuring only 3x DisplayPort and 1x HDMI as display outputs. EVGA's Precision X1 overclocking utility is bundled with the graphics cards.
Source: EVGA
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30 Comments on EVGA Introduces the GeForce RTX 2080 & 2070 SUPER KO Graphics Cards

#1
neatfeatguy
I like the shimmering lighter blue color on the chart - that shimmer means better. Yes. The shimmer told me it's better. I need to get my shimmer on!
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#2
xkm1948
You can get an additional 5% off with the associates code
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#3
Cheeseball
Not a Potato
These are just less-premium (no black pate, subpar fans) versions of the reference cards. The Black edition series were the same. You might as well get the Founder's Edition versions off Best Buy for the same price (and sometimes discounted $50 to $100 off).
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#4
RH92
Cheeseball
These are just less-premium (no black pate, subpar fans) versions of the reference cards.
What are you talking about ? EVGA runs these fans on all their cards even on the XC Ultra models ( 3 slots ) which are their higher end models , so what makes you think those fans are subpar ? Don't get me wrong im not saying they are great , i haven't seen proper testing or comparisons with other fans used by other brands , hence why i don't understand what makes you think they are subpar ..........

Generaly speaking these low end coolers perform as well as the FE but they give you fan stop which the FE doesn't www.techpowerup.com/review/evga-geforce-rtx-2080-super-black/31.html
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#5
Cheeseball
Not a Potato
RH92
What are you talking about ? EVGA runs these fans on all their cards even on the XC Ultra models ( 3 slots ) which are their higher end models , so what makes you think those fans are subpar ?

Generaly speaking these low end coolers perform as well as the FE but they give you fan stop which the FE doesn't www.techpowerup.com/review/evga-geforce-rtx-2080-super-black/31.html
Yes, both support iCX2 control and stopping the fans at low temps, but the plastic material used on fans themselves feel tacky, compared to the harder/solid-feeling ones on the stock FEs (and the ASUS STRIX ones). I know this because I tried both the Black and XC Ultras before settling for the FE.

Aside from having a beefier cooler (for the XC Ultra) and RGB, the FE was able to match it in load temps (~62C during 4 hours of PUBG and Fallen Order, at the time).
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#6
bug
Nice. First you read "lower price point" and then, bam! $499.99 and $699.99. Not cool.
10-15 years ago I could build a decent gaming rig for $699.99.
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#7
Cheeseball
Not a Potato
bug
Nice. First you read "lower price point" and then, bam! $499.99 and $699.99. Not cool.
10-15 years ago I could build a decent gaming rig for $699.99.
If both of these (including the original Black series) were... $50(??) cheaper, then I believe they would be competitive, especially if you're not getting a back plate, USB-C and settling for the plastic-y shroud.
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#8
bug
Cheeseball
If both of these (including the original Black series) were... $50(??) cheaper, then I believe they would be competitive, especially if you're not getting a back plate and settling for the plastic-y shroud.
The 2070 might be in a tough spot, but the 2080 is certainly competitive, because AMD can't touch it. I was just saying, it feels strange to talk about GPUs and put "lower price point" and sums over $500 in the same sentence.
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#9
Cheeseball
Not a Potato
bug
The 2070 might be in a tough spot, but the 2080 is certainly competitive, because AMD can't touch it. I was just saying, it feels strange to talk about GPUs and put "lower price point" and sums over $500 in the same sentence.
Eh, well, welcome to 2020, where market inflation pushed everything up. Although, $699 wouldn't be enough for the 6800 Ultra ($500, but I remember getting it for like $440 due to shop loyalty) back in 2005. Which video card did you have back then?
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#10
Manoa
don't buy, not worth, mybe in cuple month you will have 5950xt and if it cost 700$ you will mybe have 15% more performance than 2080 ti for the price of one of this, they know it that is whay they make this "duble super" KO
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#11
EarthDog
Manoa
don't buy, not worth, mybe in cuple month you will have 5950xt and if it cost 700$ you will mybe have 15% more performance than 2080 ti for the price of one of this, they know it that is whay they make this "duble super" KO
If you're willing to wait 6 months for something new, you'll never buy anything, lol.
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#12
bug
Cheeseball
Eh, well, welcome to 2020, where market inflation pushed everything up. Although, $699 wouldn't be enough for the 6800 Ultra ($500, but I remember getting it for like $440 due to shop loyalty) back in 2005. Which video card did you have back then?
6600GT, my first Nvidia card.
Also, keep in mind, $500 back then was getting you the best of the best. Though, factoring in the inflation, that may come close to the price of a 2080 Super today (Idk, I don't have the numbers and I need to get some sleep, won't dig them up now).
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#13
Cheeseball
Not a Potato
bug
6600GT, my first Nvidia card.
Also, keep in mind, $500 back then was getting you the best of the best. Though, factoring in the inflation, that may come close to the price of a 2080 Super today (Idk, I don't have the numbers and I need to get some sleep, won't dig them up now).
I had a 128MB 6600GT (GDDR3) briefly and remember paying $180 for it in 2006. I sold it for $150 so I can use it for the 6800 Ultra because of UT2004 and HL2. :laugh:
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#14
Gmr_Chick
Call me picky, but for $500 and $700, my fking GPU sure as hell better come with a backplate and beefy cooling capability :rockout:
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#15
QUANTUMPHYSICS
So now you have a GPU without a Virtual Link port being sold at near the same price as the regular models?

I guess the choice couldn't be clearer.

BUY A 2080Ti.
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#16
Chloe Price
QUANTUMPHYSICS
So now you have a GPU without a Virtual Link port being sold at near the same price as the regular models?

I guess the choice couldn't be clearer.

BUY A 2080Ti.
A graphics card which costs about the same as a good 1080p gaming PC isn't everyone's choice. I've never paid over 200EUR for a graphics card and still games run fine.
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#17
lexluthermiester
QUANTUMPHYSICS
So now you have a GPU without a Virtual Link port being sold at near the same price as the regular models?

I guess the choice couldn't be clearer.

BUY A 2080Ti.
Most people are NOT into VR. Not really a deal breaker. Let's not make mountains out of mole-hills.
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#18
Chloe Price
lexluthermiester
Most people are NOT into VR. Not really a deal breaker. Let's not make mountains out of mole-hills.
I don't even know what that connector is for..? At least Oculus CV1 connects to USB3.0 & HDMI.
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#19
lexluthermiester
Chloe Price
I don't even know what that connector is for..? At least Oculus CV1 connects to USB3.0 & HDMI.
It's a USB-C port geared toward VR. As most people don't have it on their video cards it's not in common use, which is why it's not a deal breaker..
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#20
QUANTUMPHYSICS
lexluthermiester
It's a USB-C port geared toward VR. As most people don't have it on their video cards it's not in common use, which is why it's not a deal breaker..
I have a 2080Ti on my desktop.

I have a HTC Vive.

I normally use it on my Alienware 17" laptop (GTX 1080) when I'm designing 3D models to print or game elements.
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#21
danbert2000
This seems to be more cost cutting for EVGA than cost cutting for the consumer. I think removing the VirtuaLink port is short sighted, as it was part of the reference spec, and there are plenty of Nvidia reference 2070 Supers for $500 exactly that have this port. If you buy one of these KO editions from EVGA, you're losing out on an extra 10 Gbps USB port for absolutely no cost savings. I didn't even have one until I put my EVGA 2070 Super Black in my PC, but it will future proof my GPU if a VR headset finally comes out with support, and it is a fast USB C port with video out from a desktop, which is pretty rare.

Hell, I even bought my 2070 Super Black from EVGA directly for $500 at release. So what they are saying here with this product launch is that their existing cut rate models, the Black line, is now going to be more expensive so they can shove this even further cost reduced model into the MSRP for the card. It's pretty disappointing. At least the 2060 KO was hitting a brand new price point. These should have been released at $480/$680, or even $490/$690. Something token that would account for the fact that EVGA thinks that they shouldn't have to put all the ports on the card that the Nvidia reference card already has. Just get the reference version. Or wait for Newegg to sell the Black version for below $500, which they've done repeatedly over the year:

pcpartpicker.com/product/88drxr/evga-geforce-rtx-2070-super-8-gb-black-gaming-video-card-08g-p4-3071-kr
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#23
tabascosauz
Chloe Price
I don't even know what that connector is for..? At least Oculus CV1 connects to USB3.0 & HDMI.
lexluthermiester
It's a USB-C port geared toward VR. As most people don't have it on their video cards it's not in common use, which is why it's not a deal breaker..
The FE's USB-C has saved me a couple of times with a couple of devices that just didn't want to play nice with the regular USB connections coming off the CPU/B450. It does require its own driver (automatically selected when an RTX card with it is detected by the Nvidia installer) as it runs off a separate USB 3.1 controller in the TU106/104/102 die.

That, and it also provides a fair amount of power (27W? cant remember), which is pretty helpful for those who run portable monitors (a part of the market which has seen some expansion as of late), as many are relying on a sole C port for laptop users. Some monitor manufacturers like Dell are also catching on to the video-over-C trend, which mainly benefits ultrabooks, but RTX cards with the port can tap into that as well.

It's not the sole headlining feature on RTX, but it's definitely worth more than people usually give it credit for. I mean, if we're debating over the merits of having the Virtualink port, we're already in RTX territory; since you're the type never to spend more than $200 on a card, it would never be a consideration for you anyways.

These budget RTX cards really aren't budget enough to offset the loss of FE features and their shitty coolers - anyone remember the existing 2060 KO's blocky, pencil-eraser thermal pads that defeat the purpose of thermal pads?

@bug you and I both know that's not how that works. The 2060 and 2060 Super are already 1 x 8-pin. You can't knock it down to 1 x 6-pin just by omitting the C. 2070 Black has no C, yet it is still 1 x 8-pin just like the FE 2070, which has C. As for everything else, no AIB would remotely consider doing that for a 2070 Super and above. The TU106/104/102 dies themselves carry the USB controller regardless of whether you want to include the C port or not.
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#24
bug
tabascosauz
The FE's USB-C has saved me a couple of times with a couple of devices that just didn't want to play nice with the regular USB connections coming off the CPU/B450. It does require its own driver (automatically selected when an RTX card with it is detected by the Nvidia installer) as it runs off a separate USB 3.1 controller in the TU106/104/102 die.

That, and it also provides a fair amount of power (27W? cant remember), which is pretty helpful for those who run portable monitors (a part of the market which has seen some expansion as of late), as many are relying on a sole C port for laptop users. Some monitor manufacturers like Dell are also catching on to the video-over-C trend, which mainly benefits ultrabooks, but RTX cards with the port can tap into that as well.

It's not the sole headlining feature on RTX, but it's definitely worth more than people usually give it credit for. I mean, if we're debating over the merits of having the Virtualink port, we're already in RTX territory; since you're the type never to spend more than $200 on a card, it would never be a consideration for you anyways.

These budget RTX cards really aren't budget enough to offset the loss of FE features and their shitty coolers - anyone remember the existing 2060 KO's blocky, pencil-eraser thermal pads that defeat the purpose of thermal pads?
The thing is, as you noted, that link also delivers power. If you get rid of it, you may also get away with one less PCIe power connector.
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#25
gamefoo21
Wonder if these cards will also be packing failed cores and hard locked power limits too...

:pimp:
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