Monday, May 11th 2020

Intel Core i9-10900K Stressed, Package Power Reads 235W, Temperatures 93°C

A stock Intel Core i9-10900K 10-core processor was subjected to FPU stress by Chinese PC enthusiast @WolStame. The power and temperature values of the processor are inside HEDT territory. With a Furmark GPU stress running on the side, under AIDA64 FPU stress, the i9-10900K measured a package power draw of up to 235.17 W, as measured using HWInfo64. The CPU package temperature shot up to 93 °C. A 240 mm AIO liquid CPU cooling solution was used in the feat. Interestingly, the processor is able to sustain clock speeds of 4.77 GHz, which is close to the advertised 4.80 GHz all-core turbo boost frequency, called for by the multi-core FPU stress.

To show that the values weren't obtained in a few seconds of test, the AIDA64 Stability Test window keeps a timestamp log and displays time elapsed into the stress. In this particular case, the all-core stress has been running for close to 48 minutes; and yet the processor is keeping up with its advertised all-core boost speed, making this an impressive feat.
Sources: @WolStame (Weibo), @9550pro (Twitter)
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106 Comments on Intel Core i9-10900K Stressed, Package Power Reads 235W, Temperatures 93°C

#101
Vya Domus
It runs hot and consumes a lot of power because it's on a node that originates from 2014. Let's stop beating around the bush, TSMC went through two full nodes since then. Keep in mind this chip actually benefits from more surface area for dissipation and has lower power density per mm^2 than 7nm chips.
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#102
Berfs1
trparky
Unfortunately, that would result in all the major coolers needing to be redesigned due to the force that they exert onto the chip. That same force would more than likely break those chips and then Intel would be in an even worse situation.
Oh I didn't realize the force would be an issue... I was thinking just as long as the height from the PCB of the motherboard to the top of the IHS was the same, then it no other issues but I didn't realize the force may need to be adjusted.
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#103
trparky
Yes. A thinner IHS could be bent if the same amount of force is applied. Coolers would need to be redesigned.
Posted on Reply
#104
EarthDog
Berfs1
Oh I didn't realize the force would be an issue... I was thinking just as long as the height from the PCB of the motherboard to the top of the IHS was the same, then it no other issues but I didn't realize the force may need to be adjusted.
It would, but only in certain situations.

Direct die changes everything as it changes the height. Coolers need to be designed for this, or, as we saw some mfg do, offer a shim kit for delid/bare die cooling.

A thinner IHS with the same package dimensions (height) likely wouldn't be a worry all around. But all other things remaining the same, any cooler with hard stops it won't make a bit if difference.

I don't recall many convex cold plates, though they do exist. Those without hard stops and a convex cold plate could have an issue with a thinner ihs.
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#105
John Naylor
I still find it odd that such tests are in any way relevant ...... its the equivalent of testing an SUV's ability to toe tour new Sku-Doo 35 miles to the beach .... by trying to pull a 12,000m pond lous up and over the rockies in the wrong gear .... "I wonder how much heat I can generate by running a CPU under loading it will never be exposed to ?" I'm not really interested in which CPU can draw the most power or to determines if "mines bigger", only how it does the job I'm asking it to do.
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#106
Master Tom
John Naylor
I still find it odd that such tests are in any way relevant ...... its the equivalent of testing an SUV's ability to toe tour new Sku-Doo 35 miles to the beach .... by trying to pull a 12,000m pond lous up and over the rockies in the wrong gear .... "I wonder how much heat I can generate by running a CPU under loading it will never be exposed to ?" I'm not really interested in which CPU can draw the most power or to determines if "mines bigger", only how it does the job I'm asking it to do.
No it is not odd. Only because you are not running computationally demanding programs, does not mean that is true for everyone.
I have several applications, that run under full load on all threads of the cpu.
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