Thursday, July 30th 2020

GALAX Intros HOF OC Lab Diamond DDR4-5000 and HOF OC Lab Phantom Enthusiast Memory

GALAX on Thursday introduced the Hall of Fame (HOF) OC Lab Diamond and HOF OC Lab Phantom lines of enthusiast-segment memory. These kits are led by a DDR4-5000 memory kit with 19-26-26-46 timings. The company didn't put out voltages, but the DDR4-4800 + 19-22-22-46T variant in the same series pulls 1.5 V, so the DDR4-5000 kit is only expected to be equal or higher. Other high-voltage hits include DDR4-4600 18-26-26-42 @1.5 V; DDR4-4400 18-22-22-42 @1.50 V; and DDR4-4266 17-22-22-38 @1.50 V. The HOF OC Lab Diamond memory kits feature chunky aluminium heatspreaders with pearl-white finish and a gold-plated ornament.

The HOF OC Lab Phantom line is positioned a notch below the HOF OC Lab Diamond. It comes in enthusiast-segment memory frequencies of DDR4-4000 17-19-19-38 @1.45 V (19-25-25-25 @1.40 V); DDR4-3866 16-18-18-36 @1.40 V, and DDR4-3600 16-16-16-36 @1.35 V. These modules feature aluminium heatspreaders with an acrylic crown RGB diffuser. The aluminium heatspreader features diamond-cut edges. The company didn't reveal pricing of either kits. At this time only the Greater China regional division of GALAX released the two memory lines.
Source: Tom's Hardware
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8 Comments on GALAX Intros HOF OC Lab Diamond DDR4-5000 and HOF OC Lab Phantom Enthusiast Memory

#1
Berfs1
God damn those look so amazing... Finally a kit of ram that gives the TridentZ Royals a run for its money!
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#2
Aqeel Shahzad
Darn, i wonder which of the motherboards will push it.

P.S. JDEC announced DDR5 with 1.1v with speed starting from 6400mhz. DDR4 cannot reach those speeds.
Posted on Reply
#3
Anymal
Sheikh's son will upgrade his computer down in Arabia.
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#4
kayjay010101
Aqeel Shahzad
Darn, i wonder which of the motherboards will push it.

P.S. JDEC announced DDR5 with 1.1v with speed starting from 6400mhz. DDR4 cannot reach those speeds.
JEDEC's standard as laid out in JESD79-5 actually starts at 3200. The standard bins are 3200 / 3600 / 4000 / 4400 / 4800 / 5200 / 5600 / 6000 / 6400, with placeholder future bins of 6800 / 7200 / 7600 / 8000 / 8400. 6400 is actually where the standard tops out right now without going into placeholder bins.

But you're right, DDR4 can't reach the top speed of DDR5, but again, that's expected. 3200 was the highest speed JEDEC bin of DDR4, and no DDR3 module got there. But 2133 was the standard and many DDR3 modules could get there, just like many DDR4 modules get to 3200. The low end of one standard is usually the high end of the previous. High end DDR2 was 800 and some kits got to 1066, low end DDR3 was 800 (very rare) or more commonly 1066. High end DDR3 was 2133, which became low end DDR4. High end DDR4 was 3200, which will now become low end DDR5.
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#5
Aqeel Shahzad
kayjay010101
JEDEC's standard as laid out in JESD79-5 actually starts at 3200. The standard bins are 3200 / 3600 / 4000 / 4400 / 4800 / 5200 / 5600 / 6000 / 6400, with placeholder future bins of 6800 / 7200 / 7600 / 8000 / 8400. 6400 is actually where the standard tops out right now without going into placeholder bins.

But you're right, DDR4 can't reach the top speed of DDR5, but again, that's expected. 3200 was the highest speed JEDEC bin of DDR4, and no DDR3 module got there. But 2133 was the standard and many DDR3 modules could get there, just like many DDR4 modules get to 3200. The low end of one standard is usually the high end of the previous. High end DDR2 was 800 and some kits got to 1066, low end DDR3 was 800 (very rare) or more commonly 1066. High end DDR3 was 2133, which became low end DDR4. High end DDR4 was 3200, which will now become low end DDR5.
Thank you for clearing up but just to remind you that ddr2 maxed out at 1200mhz and ddr3 maxed out at 2800mhz. My point is ddr3 started from 1333 and ddr2 stopped at 1200mhz. However ddr3 stopped at 2800mhz where ddr4 started from 2133mhz. If we look similarly and as you explained this has been always the case from the release of ddr3. Bringing more headroom and XMP child’s play.
As now ddr4 is compromised with peak levels of 5000mhz where ddr5 would be starting at 3200mhz ?
I dont think thats going to happen. Ddr5 might end up producing clocks exceeding ddr4 clocks.
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#6
CandymanGR
And the performance gains compared to a 3600Mhz Ram will be... 0,5%.
Posted on Reply
#7
c2DDragon
CandymanGR
And the performance gains compared to a 3600Ghz Ram will be... 0,5%.
3600000Mhz ? :D
I hope there will be better than RAM modules in the future, neural systems ?
Posted on Reply
#8
CandymanGR
c2DDragon
3600000Mhz ? :D
I hope there will be better than RAM modules in the future, neural systems ?
Ooops.. sorry it was a typo. I was going to write Mhz, then i stopped to pick up a phone call and then.. i just kept it going but.. in Ghz. I will correct it.
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