Thursday, August 20th 2020

IBM Delivers Its Highest Quantum Volume to Date

Today, IBM has unveiled a new milestone on its quantum computing road map, achieving the company's highest Quantum Volume to date. Combining a series of new software and hardware techniques to improve overall performance, IBM has upgraded one of its newest 27-qubit client-deployed systems to achieve a Quantum Volume 64. The company has made a total of 28 quantum computers available over the last four years through IBM Quantum Experience.

In order to achieve a Quantum Advantage, the point where certain information processing tasks can be performed more efficiently or cost effectively on a quantum computer, versus a classical one, it will require improved quantum circuits, the building blocks of quantum applications. Quantum Volume measures the length and complexity of circuits - the higher the Quantum Volume, the higher the potential for exploring solutions to real world problems across industry, government, and research.

To achieve this milestone, the company focused on a new set of techniques and improvements that used knowledge of the hardware to optimally run the Quantum Volume circuits. These hardware-aware methods are extensible and will improve any quantum circuit run on any IBM Quantum system, resulting in improvements to the experiments and applications which users can explore. These techniques will be available in upcoming releases and improvements to the IBM Cloud software services and the cross-platform open source software development kit (SDK) Qiskit.

"We are always finding new ways to push the limits of our systems so that we can run larger, more complex quantum circuits and more quickly achieve a Quantum Advantage," said Jay Gambetta, IBM Fellow and Vice President, IBM Quantum. "IBM's full-stack approach gives an innovative avenue to develop hardware-aware applications, algorithms and circuits, all running on the most extensive and powerful quantum hardware fleet in the industry."

The IBM Quantum team has shared details on the technical improvements made across the full stack to reach Quantum Volume 64 in a preprint released on arXiv, today.

IBM Quantum Highlights
  • IBM has reached Quantum Volume 64 on a 27-qubit system deployed within the IBM Q Network
  • 28 quantum computing systems deployed on the IBM Cloud over the last four years with eight systems boasting a Quantum Volume of 32
  • The IBM Q Network has 115 client, government, startup, partner, and university members
  • 250,000+ registered users of the IBM Quantum Experience
  • Users routinely execute more than 1 Billion hardware circuits per day on IBM Quantum systems on the IBM Cloud
  • Researchers have published 250+ papers based on work on IBM Quantum systems
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46 Comments on IBM Delivers Its Highest Quantum Volume to Date

#1
Xex360
I'm struggling to understand quantum computing, how can you harness randomness of quantum mechanics??
Any suggestions of materials to better understand??
Posted on Reply
#3
Vayra86
Xex360I'm struggling to understand quantum computing, how can you harness randomness of quantum mechanics??
Any suggestions of materials to better understand??
This is a start...
I didn't get through the whole thing tbh with you :P
Wizardry, I say.

www.wikihow.com/Understand-Quantum-Physics
Posted on Reply
#4
Vya Domus
Xex360I'm struggling to understand quantum computing, how can you harness randomness of quantum mechanics??
Any suggestions of materials to better understand??
A quantum computer is just a controllable (that's the goal) quantum system. Thus it's primary function really is to simulate quantum events rather than classical computation.
Posted on Reply
#6
PowerPC
I'm not afraid of quantum computers breaking encryption as much as people in power have to be afraid of it.
Posted on Reply
#7
Xex360
Vayra86This is a start...
I didn't get through the whole thing tbh with you :p
Wizardry, I say.

www.wikihow.com/Understand-Quantum-Physics
I have read a few things about quantum mechanics, but I still don't understand how they can use it in computing, for randomness it's perfect like some commented it could revolutionise encryption.
Unless I missing the point, and it's rather used for some specific computing and not as a replacement for our normal binary system.
Posted on Reply
#8
Hemmingstamp
PowerPCI'm not afraid of quantum computers breaking encryption as much as people in power have to be afraid of it.
Quite the opposite. It can be abused by those in power.
Posted on Reply
#9
Easo
HemmingstampQuite the opposite. It can be abused by those in power.
Let's be more precise - it can be abused by anyone with enough skill and access to said systems.
Posted on Reply
#10
Hemmingstamp
EasoLet's be more precise - it can be abused by anyone with enough skill and access to said systems.
I doubt this technology will be available to the average Joe, do you? It's clearly in the hands of those running / or are part of the circus, hence my reply.
Posted on Reply
#11
PowerPC
HemmingstampI doubt this technology will be available to the average Joe, do you? It's clearly in the hands of those running / or are part of the circus, hence my reply.
Don't know what kind of conspiracy theory that is. By that logic, we wouldn't have access to modern digital CPUs because they're so much more powerful than any mechanical computation devices they had 100 years ago. Doubt it or not, if it's out and it's that powerful, it'll be out. What else are they (IBM and others) developing it exactly for in your mind?

It'll take at least the next 30 years of slow, but open to the public like this, incremental development. By that time, people will know exactly how to build one. It's not hard to figure out how to build a dual bit computer these days. And it was never really a secret before. Anyone can build a rudimentary computer from single transistors today if they know what they are doing. This won't be any different with quantum computers, once the components are readily available.
Posted on Reply
#12
Vayra86
HemmingstampI doubt this technology will be available to the average Joe, do you? It's clearly in the hands of those running / or are part of the circus, hence my reply.
Well no, in fact any single person can go to the top/subtop level of middle school and then study here.

Its a normal university like any other and the field of science is a field like every other.

www.tudelft.nl/en/faculty-of-applied-sciences/about-faculty/departments/quantum-nanoscience/

As for available to the average joe, there isn't a single commercial use case for it yet. So even if you had it... what would you do with it?

You have to realize this is a leap in technology especially, and first of all, in terms of cybersecurity. So what you want is broad knowledge of this stuff, because knowledge in this case truly, literally is power. And lacking knowledge will cause you (as a state, company, population) severe risk and trouble. The foremost use case right now that is envisioned is not only communication over distance but most notably cracking encryption, as quantum can do that many orders faster than any binary system.

So what you WILL get as lowly consumer/civilian is probably some form of security that mitigates quantum decryption methods.
Posted on Reply
#13
Hemmingstamp
PowerPCDon't know what kind of conspiracy theory that is.
I read that part and..MEH.
Posted on Reply
#14
Vayra86
HemmingstampWith the upside comes the downside.



www.hudson.org/research/14484-quantum-computing-how-to-address-the-national-security-risk
You said it, but is it a downside? Its a reality that is closely connected to technological progress. In the same vein, fire and gunpowder are up- and downsides, perhaps :) But I really only see the upside here. Its progress. The more we know, the more we can secure. More so than upsides or downsides, is this a technological race, an arms race if you consider states between each other, even.

So far all those arms races have been hugely beneficial to our progress. Think Space Race. This is really quite similar.

Additionally, if we're racing against each other, we aren't shooting.
Posted on Reply
#15
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
Xex360Unless I missing the point, and it's rather used for some specific computing and not as a replacement for our normal binary system.
This is exactly right. A quantum computer will never, ever make it into a PC (as in a Personal Computer) or anything that is supposed to be a generic number cruncher. One explanation (and I have no idea if this is accurate) is that a quantum machine is great at quantum calculations, meaning stuff that happens on a quantum level. Like accurately calculate properties of molecules or magnetism. Simulations. And a bunch of other very specific stuff. At this point it's hard to know exactly what they will be great at as they are still very much beta machines. So you won't use one as a personal computing device, but one day you might task one with work, especially if machine learning and quantum machines work well together, which .. I have no idea if they do or not, but I guess they might. Machine learning is going through endless data to reach a point and then go again and quantum computers can be exceptionally good at that. This is where the next decade or so gets really interesting.
Posted on Reply
#16
Vayra86
FrickThis is exactly right. A quantum computer will never, ever make it into a PC (as in a Personal Computer) or anything that is supposed to be a generic number cruncher. One explanation (and I have no idea if this is accurate) is that a quantum machine is great at quantum calculations, meaning stuff that happens on a quantum level. Like accurately calculate properties of molecules or magnetism. Simulations. And a bunch of other very specific stuff. At this point it's hard to know exactly what they will be great at as they are still very much beta machines. So you won't use one as a personal computing device, but one day you might task one with work, especially if machine learning and quantum machines work well together, which .. I have no idea if they do or not, but I guess they might. Machine learning is going through endless data to reach a point and then go again and quantum computers can be exceptionally good at that. This is where the next decade or so gets really interesting.
Seriously when QM meets ML, the Matrix is actually complete. We've launched systems we don't fully comprehend and are capable of self-iteration at that point.
Posted on Reply
#17
Hemmingstamp
Vayra86Well no, in fact any single person can go to the top/subtop level of middle school and then study here.
In a controlled environment.
Vayra86As for available to the average joe, there isn't a single commercial use case for it yet. So even if you had it... what would you do with it?
Already stated that.
Vayra86You have to realize this is a leap in technology especially, and first of all, in terms of cybersecurity. So what you want is broad knowledge of this stuff, because knowledge in this case truly, literally is power. And lacking knowledge will cause you (as a state, company, population) severe risk and trouble. The foremost use case right now that is envisioned is not only communication over distance but most notably cracking encryption, as quantum can do that many orders faster than any binary system.
?
Formerly an Engineer, I understand it perfectly well. I even used to make my own food to take to my former place of work. Aren't I clever :confused:
And we have a computer scientist in the family. God, she used to bore me to tears.
Look, I'm merely pointing out the pitfalls of new thechnology in the wrong hands. There really is no need to write an essay about it.
Just make your point brief and to the point, that's all I'm asking. :)
Vayra86You said it, but is it a downside?
I did. And yes, it does have it's downsides. Please read the link I posted earlier.
Posted on Reply
#18
Vayra86
HemmingstampIn a controlled environment.



Already stated that.



?
Formerly an Engineer, I understand it perfectly well. I even used to make my own food to take to my former place of work. Aren't I clever :confused:
And we have a computer scientist in the family. God, she used to bore me to tears.
Look, I'm merely pointing out the pitfalls of new thechnology in the wrong hands. There really is no need to write an essay about it.
Just make your point brief and to the point, that's all I'm asking. :)



I did. And yes, it does have it's downsides. Please read the link I posted earlier.
Sorry for being the school teacher. I do that too often I guess. Its not even so much particularly ever aimed at a single person I respond to, but more as an overall bit of knowledge on the subject, for those not in the know. I obviously don't know what you know :)

Another thing I'm fond of is trying to put a different perspective, or logic, on a subject. That's what I tried with the point of whether its a downside or not. It depends on how you look at it, sometimes.
Posted on Reply
#19
InVasMani
Xex360I'm struggling to understand quantum computing, how can you harness randomness of quantum mechanics??
Any suggestions of materials to better un
IDK Sorcery!!? It's probably a bit like being a really f*ckin good pinball wizard at the sub atomic level.
Posted on Reply
#20
r9
It's a gimmick, useful as 28 transistor CPU.
Posted on Reply
#21
Hemmingstamp
Vayra86Sorry for being the school teacher. I do that too often I guess. Its not even so much particularly ever aimed at a single person I respond to, but more as an overall bit of knowledge on the subject, for those not in the know. I obviously don't know what you know :)

Another thing I'm fond of is trying to put a different perspective, or logic, on a subject. That's what I tried with the point of whether its a downside or not. It depends on how you look at it, sometimes.
I was a shit for having a low level rant. My bad too. No harm done. :)
Posted on Reply
#22
lexluthermiester
HemmingstampWith the upside comes the downside.

www.hudson.org/research/14484-quantum-computing-how-to-address-the-national-security-risk
That article over-simplifies things to a great extent. It isn't meant to demonstrate an actual risk, only to present a theorized concept. A quantum processor would need to have a base algorithm for the compute needed to break any given encryption scheme. Each variation would need it's own algorithm. Such is not easily achieved as a directed attack on a cypher has to be built in a way similar to conventional methods. The more complex the cypher, the longer it will take to crack, even for a quantum processor. For example, a lone 256bit cypher would take a quantum processor with 128qbits approximately 3 days to break(using a proposed theory as a basis of estimation). Using a double cascade cypher set would take 8 years. A triple cascade, 73 years. Increase the cypher strength to 512bit or even 1024bit and the time needed still falls outside the range of a complete human lifetime. Increasing the number of qbits per quantum processor does not guarantee an equivalent reduction in time.

Cracking encryption does not become a breeze with a quantum computer, it just becomes faster depending on the parameters and requirements at play. Quantum computers do not and will not make today's modern encryption irrelevant. Things just don't work that way.
Posted on Reply
#23
PowerPC
HemmingstampI read that part and..MEH.
I'm totally surprised by your answer (from somebody who signed up 2 months ago and already has 182 posts)..NOT.
Posted on Reply
#24
Hemmingstamp
PowerPCI'm totally surprised by your answer (from somebody who signed up 2 months ago and already has 182 posts)..NOT.
When you reply using Don't know what kind of conspiracy theory that is. what sort of response did you expect?
It's a form of attack. Have some manners when responding in future, You might get a better response.
Posted on Reply
#25
PowerPC
HemmingstampWhen you reply using Don't know what kind of conspiracy theory that is. what sort of response did you expect?
It's a form of attack. Have some manners when responding in future, You might get a better response.
You literally wrote "they" won't let us have this technology. It's the pure definition of a conspiracy, and it's your theory...

Maybe actually read my whole post as I gave your post the same favor, before answering with MEH after only reading one sentence of what I wrote. Don't talk about manners, if you want to ignore the smallest criticism of what you wrote so quickly. This is a public forum, so be prepared that what you write will be scrutinized. And no need to take these things immediately as a personal attack.
Posted on Reply
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