Thursday, October 8th 2020

ViewSonic Introduces the XG270Q, the Latest 27-inch ELITE Gaming Monitor with G-SYNC Technology

ViewSonic Corp., a leading global provider of visual solutions, announced the launch of the newest addition to its award-winning ViewSonic ELITE line of gaming monitors with the XG270Q Designed to deliver an amazing gaming experience, the XG270Q features a 165Hz refresh rate, 1 ms (GtG) response time and NVIDIA's G-SYNC Compatible technology for a smooth and seamless gaming experience.

As part of its ELITE gaming portfolio, the ViewSonic XG270Q is a 27-inch monitor that can achieve true 1ms (GtG) response time. Along with the 165Hz* refresh rate and G-SYNC Compatible technology, the XG270Q ensures effortless gameplay within even the fastest scenarios. This gaming monitor also boasts a frameless IPS panel with native QHD (2560x1440) resolution and VESA DisplayHDR 400 certification that brings games to life with vibrant colors and incisive details.
"ViewSonic developed the ELITE XG270Q, as an option for those looking for a 27-inch screen that offers all the technology features that are important for gamers at a more affordable price range," said Jason Maryne, Product Marketing Manager for ViewSonic ELITE gaming monitors. "We brought in a monitor that can deliver the speed and vibrancy that gamers want, with design enhancements that fulfill the ambiance of a gaming environment. The XG270Q ensures greater visual fluidity and smooth, uninterrupted gameplay."

ELITE XG270Q Gaming Monitor
  • 27-inch gaming monitor with native 2560x1440 (QHD) resolution and a brightness of 400 nits
  • IPS panel certified for VESA DisplayHDR 400
  • 165Hz refresh rate and 1ms (GtG) response time
  • 165Hz refresh rate with DisplayPort
  • NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatible technology to eliminate screen-tearing and minimizing stutter and input lag
  • It features a frameless design and built-in speakers, along with an integrated mouse anchor, headphone hook, ELITE RGB ambient lighting and ultra-thin brushed aluminium base
  • Available in mid-October 2020 for an estimated street price of $479.99
For more information, visit the product page.
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13 Comments on ViewSonic Introduces the XG270Q, the Latest 27-inch ELITE Gaming Monitor with G-SYNC Technology

#2
TheLostSwede
That stand though... :rolleyes:
pat-roner
Another 400nits panel....
Because anything better equals a lot higher cost. Anything higher and you need not only local dimming, but a 10-bit panel.
displayhdr.org/
Posted on Reply
#3
Prime2515102
pat-roner
Another 400nits panel....
400 nits is brighter than a 100 watt incandescent lightbulb (it's nearly 1400 lumens). I wouldn't even want it that bright from a monitor. A TV might be different story...
Posted on Reply
#4
mtcn77
Prime2515102
400 nits is brighter than a 100 watt incandescent lightbulb (it's nearly 1400 lumens). I wouldn't even want it that bright from a monitor. A TV might be different story...
You just multiplied it by its surface area, didn't you?
Posted on Reply
#5
Prime2515102
No, I multiplied it by 3.426, which is an approximation. The real math for this is too complicated for my feeble mind, so I looked up the shortcut. lol

edit: However, since you mentioned surface area, it's probably not quite the same experience since all the lumens from a bulb are concentrated in a very small space whereas it's spread over the whole screen with a monitor. Still, it's too bright with the possible exception of an office environment (generally better lit than an average room in a home). This is just my opinion I reckon... My current non-HDR monitor (250 nits rated) is too bright except in the daytime with sun coming in.
Posted on Reply
#6
mtcn77
Prime2515102
No, I multiplied it by 3.426, which is an approximation.
I give in.
Posted on Reply
#7
Chomiq
TheLostSwede
That stand though... :rolleyes:


Because anything better equals a lot higher cost. Anything higher and you need not only local dimming, but a 10-bit panel.
displayhdr.org/
10-bit image processing. So 8-bit + FRC should cover it, right?
Posted on Reply
#8
mtcn77
Chomiq
10-bit image processing. So 8-bit + FRC should cover it, right?
Don't fancy the weak, wide gamut causes slower red decay.
Posted on Reply
#9
Chomiq
mtcn77
Don't fancy the weak, wide gamut causes slower red decay.
Sure, but that's true for LG NanoIPS tech.
Posted on Reply
#10
TheLostSwede
Chomiq
10-bit image processing. So 8-bit + FRC should cover it, right?
I guess so, but I can't say I've seen any HDR 500 displays at all and I think the HDR 600 ones are proper 10-bit ones, so far.
Posted on Reply
#11
pat-roner
Prime2515102
400 nits is brighter than a 100 watt incandescent lightbulb (it's nearly 1400 lumens). I wouldn't even want it that bright from a monitor. A TV might be different story...
Well, uniform and peak brightness are two different things. My MBP manages 500 nits just fine without me going blind.

I think it's time to get some decent HDR panels to the market without being crazy expensive.
Posted on Reply
#12
Ed_1
pat-roner
Well, uniform and peak brightness are two different things. My MBP manages 500 nits just fine without me going blind.

I think it's time to get some decent HDR panels to the market without being crazy expensive.
Alienware 27 Gaming Monitor (AW2721D)
IS coming out soon and according to spec supports HDR 600 but the price is listed at $1099.99. so not cheap for a 1440 panel.
Posted on Reply
#13
Chomiq
Key word:
Peak luminance of 600 cd/m2

You won't have 600 cd/m2 on a dark scene. Say you have a bright sky you might end up with elements of the scene that should reach 600 cd/m2. So HDR600 doesn't mean your display will always output at 600 cd/m2, comparison to a lightbulb is invalid here.

True HDR effect is about showing your lowest luminance together with the peak without screwing up anything in between.
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