Saturday, October 17th 2020

ClockTuner for Ryzen Version 1.1 Released

Yuri "1usmus" Bubliy released the latest version of ClockTuner for Ryzen (CTR), a utility for perfecting an AMD Ryzen-powered PC overclock. CTR lets you easily implement the most optimal clock, voltage, timing, and memory settings for your desktop, and squeezed out levels of performance previously not thought possible, with users reporting double-digit percentage performance gains for practically free.

Version 1.1 introduces a handful new features. For starters, the app's user interface comes with a separate profile management page, which can be accessed by clicking on the "profile management" button. It's now easier to reset the settings. Tool-tips across the app have been improved. CTR 1.1 also introduces additional internal checks to ensure a frequency step up doesn't run into voltage droop. Improvements have been made to the app's engine to ensure the correct commands are sent to the registers, and the "check stability" function.

DOWNLOAD: Clock Tuner for AMD Ryzen
The change-log follows.

  • The profile management buttons have moved to a separate page, which can be accessed by pressing the "PROFILE MANAGEMENT" button. The user now has 2 slot profiles to which he can record the results of the current experiment or make manual corrections.
  • A button has been added to reset the settings and pop-up tooltips have been added. The log has been slightly transformed and additional information can be displayed in it, which will allow the user to solve problems on his own without resorting to forum discussions. As an additional help, a button-link to the English video guide has been added to CTR 1.1 (Russian video guide will be added soon). It is located in the "ABOUT & HELP" tab.
  • In "Settings mode" user can include additional settings, which will be useful only for advanced users. That is, we have the concept of CTR in 2 clicks (DIAGNOSTIC - START).
  • CTR 1.1 got a new engine with some additional rules. Now, before making a step to a higher frequency, CTR checks the current frequency with reduced voltage relative to the reference one. In most cases, this can prevent BSOD during the frequency step or high Vdroop. It also helps to prevent the system from false pitch to a higher frequency if the CCX is on the edge of instability.
  • Another important advantage of the new CTR 1.1 engine is the new, secure method of controlling the frequency and voltage of the processor. This will protect user systems from sending incorrect commands to registers.
  • The load level of stress tests has been corrected for all processors and all modes. Now uses a more loyal value of FFT, which can protect the system from BSOD.
  • Load Line Calibration level requirements have been revised and thanks to the new CTR rules you can use LLC in Auto mode (in most cases you will not need to use LLC Mode 3). This also means that ASRock and Gigabyte motherboards are fully supported.
  • "Enhance accuracy" is a system of additional frequency step crushing using voltage. Depending on the reference voltage value, the CTR selects the optimal number of extra steps. Yes, the "tuning" process becomes longer, but the results are more accurate.
  • The diagnostic mode has received a number of improvements. Step time was increased and stress load was corrected using FFT. This significantly reduced the probability of BSOD. The evaluation of the cooling system allows to automatically offer the user the optimal mode. It can be an undervolting mode or an overclocking mode with the current PPT level saved. That is, if you use a BOX cooler, you will be automatically offered an undervolt mode, which has a chance to reduce the processor temperature in the load up to 15 degrees (and reduce the noise level).
  • The system of penalties for creating the final profile was redesigned. Now the penalty will depend on the maximum processor temperature during the diagnostics as well as the current Vdroop level. This allows the profile to have some additional stability reserve.
  • "Autoshare stats" allows you to send the result of successful system tuning to the server. The report contains all the information available on the "BENCHMARK" tab. After sending the result to the user, the window with the stored results on the server will automatically open. Access to the results is open for everyone.
  • "CHECK STABILITY" is an opportunity to check the system for stability. Basic time is 10 minutes if "Enhance accuracy" option is enabled - 20 minutes. If an error is found - the stress test will be stopped immediately. You may not be afraid to leave CTR unattended.
  • EDC, TDC, PPT and Max temperature values are corrected. Now the CTR protection system will not react so hard on user experiments.
  • Note. EDC, TDC, PPT and Max temperature values do not apply to PBO or telemetry settings, do not affect the CPU protection system and do not affect system performance.
  • The last important innovation is the ability to use CTR without SMT.
  • And, of course, numerous bugs have been fixed. Improved support for Ryzen 3 3100, Ryzen 5 3500 and Ryzen 5 3500X processors.
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34 Comments on ClockTuner for Ryzen Version 1.1 Released

#1
hsew
No love for Zen and Zen+ :(
Posted on Reply
#2
HD64G
Since the way of tuning for gains get through the chiplets, no need for the tool to exist for Zen and Zen+. Great effort from the dev. Many will use and benefit from it. Kudos! :clap::toast:
Posted on Reply
#3
gamefoo21
hsew
No love for Zen and Zen+ :(
PBO features this uses don't exist for Zen 1 and +.

So you'll likely never see this backported.
Posted on Reply
#4
PrEzi
Love it.
My Threadripper 3960X gained 1000 points in CB20 for free (within the same power envelope). 12900 vs 13876 points.
Posted on Reply
#5
DuxCro
I fail to see what is this program supposed to accomplish? Whenever i used it, it just lowered my CPU frequency and added a shitload of voltage. Ryzen master auto OC has set my CPU to 4.2GHz and 1.1V. 100% stable. This program sets it to 4075MHz and 1.250V. And ofc my CB20 score iss lower when this thing underclocks and overvolts my CPU.
Posted on Reply
#6
mtcn77
DuxCro
I fail to see what is this program supposed to accomplish? Whenever i used it, it just lowered my CPU frequency and added a shitload of voltage. Ryzen master auto OC has set my CPU to 4.2GHz and 1.1V. 100% stable. This program sets it to 4075MHz and 1.250V. And ofc my CB20 score iss lower when this thing underclocks and overvolts my CPU.
Might be because you didn't tailor LLC level to its specifications?

I don't get these programs, though, if they don't reflect how pbo works and only affectsmanual oc.
Posted on Reply
#7
DuxCro
mtcn77
Might be because you didn't tailor LLC level to its specifications?

I don't get these programs, though, if they don't reflect how pbo works and only affectsmanual oc.
"Load Line Calibration level requirements have been revised and thanks to the new CTR rules you can use LLC in Auto mode (in most cases you will not need to use LLC Mode 3). This also means that ASRock and Gigabyte motherboards are fully supported."
Posted on Reply
#8
mtcn77
DuxCro
"Load Line Calibration level requirements have been revised and thanks to the new CTR rules you can use LLC in Auto mode (in most cases you will not need to use LLC Mode 3). This also means that ASRock and Gigabyte motherboards are fully supported."
Well, doesn't say improved. You can omit LLC, that does not necessitate vdroop is mitigated. You can scale your power stability irregardless of the latest feature level, if you value stability over novelty.
Posted on Reply
#9
Nephilim666
I'm sure the app works great for some. My system is overall faster without it using PBO+ on my 3960x w/fclk at 1866 and RAM at 3733. System is not stable with those settings and CTR but is rock solid at those settings without CTR.
You lose a lot of single-core boost headroom in my experience with CTR v1.0 but will try again with 1.1
Posted on Reply
#10
mtcn77
Nephilim666
You lose a lot of single-core boost headroom in my experience
It is like saying "edc too low". I don't get these programs.
Posted on Reply
#11
Taotaisei
R5-3600 PBO wouldn't get past 4.15 ghz. Using 1.0b3 I was able to get 4.3 on both ccx at 1.275v and 67c using avx light. Definitely useful for me. I look forward to trying CTR 1.1 to see if it offers better or if I can get a better 1.3v.

Any suggestions on limits I should set? I'm running a Hyper 212 Black so better than stock but obviously not a big cooler or AIO.
Posted on Reply
#12
mtcn77
Taotaisei
R5-3600 PBO wouldn't get past 4.15 ghz. Using 1.0b3 I was able to get 4.3 on both ccx at 1.275v and 67c using avx light. Definitely useful for me. I look forward to trying CTR 1.1 to see if it offers better or if I can get a better 1.3v.

Any suggestions on limits I should set? I'm running a Hyper 212 Black so better than stock but obviously not a big cooler or AIO.
You might not be able to tell, but FID control doesn't let you overclock past your current rating above the temperature trigger zone. If you are above PPT/voltage>tdc, the chip doesn't clock further. It doesn't matter in manual mode or not, FID keeps it in line. You can either decrease the voltage, the llc level or the temperature for tdc, all the way up to constant edc current levels. Again, 4.15GHz is just how you approached things, this isn't a fixed solution.
Posted on Reply
#13
Taotaisei
mtcn77
You might not be able to tell, but FID control doesn't let you overclock past your current rating above the temperature trigger zone. If you are above PPT/voltage>tdc, the chip doesn't clock further. It doesn't matter in manual mode or not, FID keeps it in line. You can either decrease the voltage, the llc level or the temperature for tdc, all the way up to constant edc current levels. Again, 4.15GHz is just how you approached things, this isn't a fixed solution.
Apologies but I'm not 100% sure what you said. If it helps, I didn't try any manual oc. I just left it baseline with PBO and auto OC on. From what I read RAM oc was typically more impactful anyways. So I spent 8+ hours upping frequency and tightening timings. It was quite fun and informative, but also a pain I'd likely not do again.

Then I just used CTR to do the CPU part. I honestly feel like this program was purpose built for people like me. A little bump to performance for those with little time or simply can't understand.
Posted on Reply
#14
mtcn77
Taotaisei
Apologies but I'm not 100% sure what you said. If it helps, I didn't try any manual oc. I just left it baseline with PBO and auto OC on. From what I read RAM oc was typically more impactful anyways. So I spent 8+ hours upping frequency and tightening timings. It was quite fun and informative, but also a pain I'd likely not do again.

Then I just used CTR to do the CPU part. I honestly feel like this program was purpose built for people like me. A little bump to performance for those with little time or simply can't understand.
If you were doing it according to pbo, these mean more in that case. Be sure to overclock tertiary dram timings with motherboard automatic setup while setting trfc yourself. It matters a lot.
You cannot use pbo to full extent if you cannot cool your cpu, I agree in that sense clocktuner is easier in that case; though how safe I wonder. You would be better served sticking to defaults imo. We have plenty of users, buildzoid included, who have egregiously fried their chips(he didn't even pay attention to how his motherboard was reporting high-load voltage levels). I see no fun in that for a couple of months of unsupervised electromigration.

www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/is-this-noctua-nf-f12-ippc-3000-pwm-worth-it-static-pressure-7-63-mmh2o.273391/post-4370777
I give a bunch of cpu cooler examples here. Yours is like a mini 34.
Posted on Reply
#15
DuxCro
I searched and searched in my MSI X570 motherboard BIOS, but i can't find anything called LLC or Load Line Calibration. Maybe it is called something else on MSI BIOS? I did find some other interesting stuff while digging around. Like auto reduction of memory latency (which actually works according to AIDA64), and some settings that give better score in certain benching programs. Like cinebench, aida and others. It actually says in BIOS in which programs, and then you pick one. But...LLC is nowhere to be found.

Edit. I searched on MSI site and they seem to have it only under intel MBO's.
Edit 2. I did find it. Set it to 3 as recommended. Idk is this AMD thing with them being notorious for their garbage drivers, but now my CPU is superovervoltaged and clock reduced. I was able to set 4.2GHHz and 1.1V on core manually. Super stable. Now this program recommends 3950MHz and 1.275V. And auto OC in Ryzen Master Recommends 1.475V!!! for 4.3GHz. Somehow, for whatever black magic reason, even after setting LLC back to auto, that magical 4.2GHz with 1.1V is impossible.
Posted on Reply
#16
basco
how much settings ya have Mr.DuxCro for LLC ? is 3 max?
normally i take 75% so if there is a 1 to 10 setting like in asus bios i would take 7 or 8 so that for Example 1,250 volt is circa 1,225 under load.
Posted on Reply
#17
Max(IT)
gamefoo21
PBO features this uses don't exist for Zen 1 and +.

So you'll likely never see this backported.
As far as I know pbo has nothing to do with what this app is doing
basco
how much settings ya have Mr.DuxCro for LLC ? is 3 max?
normally i take 75% so if there is a 1 to 10 setting like in asus bios i would take 7 or 8 so that for Example 1,250 volt is circa 1,225 under load.
In Asus bios I have just 5 levels of LLC. All of the asus X570 and B550 have 5 levels...
Nephilim666
I'm sure the app works great for some. My system is overall faster without it using PBO+ on my 3960x w/fclk at 1866 and RAM at 3733. System is not stable with those settings and CTR but is rock solid at those settings without CTR.
You lose a lot of single-core boost headroom in my experience with CTR v1.0 but will try again with 1.1
Well 3960X is a totally different beast, but I can say for sure I’ve got an improvement on my 3900X.
CB20 went from 7200-ish to 7700, which is great.

single thread lost ? There is nothing single threaded nowadays, not even notepad ;)
by the way I went from 524 to 510 points CB20 single thread, so I wouldn’t call it “a lot” of damage.
I’m using CCX1 and CCX2 @ 4400 MHz and CCX3 and CCX4 @ 4200 MHz, at 1.250 V on a silver sample 3900X
Posted on Reply
#18
DuxCro
basco
how much settings ya have Mr.DuxCro for LLC ? is 3 max?
normally i take 75% so if there is a 1 to 10 setting like in asus bios i would take 7 or 8 so that for Example 1,250 volt is circa 1,225 under load.
8 settings
Posted on Reply
#19
mtcn77
DuxCro
8 settings
8 is not the highest, it is an inverse scale. Base is 5.
Posted on Reply
#20
Chrispy_
I haven't tried this yet as it seems to focus on reaching max clocks. Does it optimise for efficiency too?

Let's say I'm happy with my 3900X but don't like the voltage and subsequent temperature spikes that are applied to reach 4.6GHz by default. I don't want to underclock but I'm wondering if there's an fast and easy way to find the undervolt sweet spot.
Posted on Reply
#21
DuxCro
mtcn77
8 is not the highest, it is an inverse scale. Base is 5.
That's how many settings i have. By default, it is on auto.
Posted on Reply
#22
billeman
Chrispy_
I haven't tried this yet as it seems to focus on reaching max clocks. Does it optimise for efficiency too?

Let's say I'm happy with my 3900X but don't like the voltage and subsequent temperature spikes that are applied to reach 4.6GHz by default. I don't want to underclock but I'm wondering if there's an fast and easy way to find the undervolt sweet spot.
My fast and easy way to find a completely stable underclock :
Set undervolt offset for example 0.050V
Test with Prime95 Small FFT's (second option) AVX all enabled and let it run through all FFT sizes.
If you don't have a core that crashes it's stable.
Rinse and repeat (with bigger undervolt offsets until it gets unstable).
Don't go more than 0.100V undervolt, even before that you will lose boostspeeds.
I run 0.050V undervolt myself.
Posted on Reply
#23
INSTG8R
Vanguard Beta Tester
billeman
My fast and easy way to find a completely stable underclock :
Set undervolt offset for example 0.050V
Test with Prime95 Small FFT's (second option) AVX all enabled and let it run through all FFT sizes.
If you don't have a core that crashes it's stable.
Rinse and repeat (with bigger undervolt offsets until it gets unstable).
Don't go more than 0.100V undervolt, even before that you will lose boostspeeds.
I run 0.050V undervolt myself.
I run a -0.100V offset so runs between 1.28-1.35 with t odd 1.4 peak on my 3700X. While I haven’t had any luck running this without crashing and despite it saying I have a Golden Sample. The actual test voltages are pretty low. Someone pointed out the obvious I should raise the reference test voltage a little and see if I can get it to finish without crashing.
Posted on Reply
#24
gamefoo21
Max(IT)
As far as I know pbo has nothing to do with what this app is doing
This App is using the same mechanisms that PBO does to adjust things on the fly.

It's literally a soft mod for PBO. It changes the clock/volt/frequency tables of PB/PBO.
Posted on Reply
#25
Max(IT)
gamefoo21
This App is using the same mechanisms that PBO does to adjust things on the fly.

It's literally a soft mod for PBO. It changes the clock/volt/frequency tables of PB/PBO.
PB2 and PBO are two different things.
PBO doesnt change voltage o frequencies. It just modifies CPU limits (EDC, TDC and PPT).
Posted on Reply
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