Wednesday, May 26th 2021

AMD Socket AM5 Package Underside Pictured

We've known since last week that AMD's upcoming desktop processor socket, AM5, will be a land-grid array (LGA), much like Intel's desktop sockets; and today we have a first-look at what the land-grid will look like, courtesy of ExecutableFix, who first broke news of AM5 being an LGA of 1,718 pins. Below is a render of the AM5 contact pad (the underside of the processor). The 1,718 contacts span across the fiberglass substrate, with no socket island in the middle for ancillaries. All electrical ancillaries are located on the obverse side of the substrate, surrounding the die(s). The substrate area will remain 40 mm x 40 mm, so the processor package will be roughly of the same size as AM4. In comparison, Intel's upcoming LGA1700 package is expected to measure 37.5 mm x 45 mm (a rectangular substrate).

ExecutableFix put out a handful more details about the I/O of this socket. Apparently, AM5 is a pure-DDR5 platform, with no backwards compatibility with DDR4. The socket features a dual-channel DDR5 memory interface. The PCI-Express interface is PCI-Express 4.0, with the socket putting out 28 lanes in total. 16 of these go to the PEG slot(s), four to an M.2 NVMe slot, and possibly the remaining eight as chipset bus. Considering these are Gen 4, the next-generation X670 (X570 successor) chipset could have double the chipset-bus bandwidth compared to Intel Z590. A typical Socket AM5 chip, such as "Rembrandt," could feature a TDP of 120 W, going up to 170 W, according to the source.
Source: ExecutableFix (Twitter)
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16 Comments on AMD Socket AM5 Package Underside Pictured

#1
TumbleGeorge
Hmm socket for future ZEN4 TR5 may increase number of pins/contacts with much larger percent than it's increased in AM5?
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#2
Lionheart
Is X680 the new naming scheme? If so the XX70 numerical marketing name worked fine AMD.
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#3
TheLostSwede
It's a mockup though, the real deal might not even look like that.
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#4
Fouquin
"Pictured" sir this is a render, and it's not even accurate...
TumbleGeorgeHmm socket for future ZEN4 TR5 may increase number of pins/contacts with much larger percent than it's increased in AM5?
The next big socket will have a couple thousand more pins, yeah. A real chunky boi.
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#5
Dredi
TumbleGeorgeHmm socket for future ZEN4 TR5 may increase number of pins/contacts with much larger percent than it's increased in AM5?
If it copies the changes planned for epyc, we will see 50% more memory pins for a total of up to 24 ddr5 channels. Traditionally threadripper has had the channels halved, so 12 of those would be in use for TR5. The number of pcie lanes is rumored to stay at 128.
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#6
Dammeron
Every LGA until now had contacts in lined rows. I doubt this one will be staggered.
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#7
Fouquin
DammeronEvery LGA until now had contacts in lined rows. I doubt this one will be staggered.
You mean the hex pitch? That's not new... Goes back to LGA2011.
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#8
bug
Will they really get rid of pins?
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#9
Mussels
Moderprator
DrediIf it copies the changes planned for epyc, we will see 50% more memory pins for a total of up to 24 ddr5 channels. Traditionally threadripper has had the channels halved, so 12 of those would be in use for TR5. The number of pcie lanes is rumored to stay at 128.
wait, HOW many memory channels?

thats getting absurd
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#10
Dredi
Musselswait, HOW many memory channels?

thats getting absurd
No it is not. One memory channel in ddr4 uses 80 or so pins, in ddr5 it is half of that. A single ddr5 dimm serves two channels at once. Read the wiki article about ddr5 and you’ll understand better how it is configured to work.

on the outside a 4 channel ddr5 motherboard looks the same as a 2 channel ddr4 board.
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#11
piloponth
bugWill they really get rid of pins?
Pins costs you copper and gold, aka money.
Let manufaturer of motherboard pays that money.
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#12
bug
piloponthPins costs you copper and gold, aka money.
Let manufaturer of motherboard pays that money.
It's not about money, it's about getting bent.
Pins on a CPU are fully exposed, it's way, way easier to bend one.
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#13
Wirko
piloponthPins costs you copper and gold, aka money.
Let manufaturer of motherboard pays that money.
Contacts in LGA and PGA sockets are similar in size and complexity, they should cost about the same.
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#14
lexluthermiester
This is interesting progress for AMD. So the question will be, will AMD support AM5 for several generations like they did with AM4?
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#15
Tomorrow
bugIt's not about money, it's about getting bent.
Pin on a CPU are fully exposed, it's way, way easier to bend one.
However pins on the CPU (AM4 PGA) are also thicker and more durable than pins in the socket. Not to mention they can be bent back or even soldered back unlike motherboard pins. Those get damaged then usually you're F*cked. I quite like PGA but i understand why AMD is moving to LGA on the mainstream socket. They already have been using LGA on TR and EPYC since 2017.

The size of the package however is impressive (that's what she said) if it stays close to AM4. However im even more worried about those 1718 pins packed so closely in the socket if thats the case.
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#16
cyberloner
lexluthermiesterThis is interesting progress for AMD. So the question will be, will AMD support AM5 for several generations like they did with AM4?
if they want money... no
keep change the socket......
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