Friday, July 16th 2021

TechPowerUp is Hiring Motherboard and Memory Reviewers

We have open positions on our team for 1) a motherboard reviewer, and 2) a memory reviewer. TechPowerUp Reviews are renowned for their in-depth focus on technical and performance aspects, and are supported by a large selection of tests. We are looking for someone with experience tweaking hardware in general—and memory in particular—ideally with some overclocking experience. As a motherboard reviewer you should be able to identify the various components of a motherboard PCB, discuss their quality aspects, test relevant onboard devices, provide technical photography, and put the motherboard through a selection of tests that will evolve with your feedback and community interest. Likewise for memory, we'll need you to be able to push the memory module to its limits, to detail its OC tuning potential and stability (we're not expecting you to do LN2). You should also be able to understand DRAM IC choices, memory timings and their effects, and how everything comes together for the big picture.
In terms of language skills we're not asking for novel writers, however you should have a decent grasp of the English language, and be able to get across your thoughts, experience and excitement with the product to our readers, who may have learned English as second language.

Both positions are remote, part-time and paid. Ideally you already have some hardware on your own, we can definitely provide you with additional testing platforms, as needed. We'd prefer someone from North America/EU, but as long as shipping logistics can reach your place, any location will be fine.

While it makes some sense to combine the the memory and motherboard reviewer positions, we are considering both options—one person, or two—because we aim to maintain a high sampling rate (1-2 reviews a week, with a high probability of more during new platform launches). If you think you can handle both positions, please ensure you have sufficient time to accommodate both roles. Having your own contacts in the industry is completely optional, and the lack of any is not a dealbreaker in the hiring process. While it is certainly a plus, we already have close ties with vendors and can make the necessary introductions to get you going with review samples. If you are interested, get in touch with us by sending your application and resume with relevant experiences, if any, to w1zzard@techpowerup.com to discuss further. Any questions? Let us know in the comments of this thread.
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127 Comments on TechPowerUp is Hiring Motherboard and Memory Reviewers

#26
delshay
tabascosauzyou clearly haven't been around Thaiphoon much if you think it's always right......8Gb C-die identifies as B-die, CJR identifies as DJR, 4Gb E-die identifies as 4Gb D-die, etc. Yes it is programmed into the SPD, but more often than you think it's done so incorrectly. Looking at the chips never lies - but like I said it's a pain.
Just updated my posting, die revision is at byte 352. ..& no I have never used Thaiphoon burner. What I'm pointing out is, you can identify everything by the code which is programmed into the SPD. ..You don't need Thaiphoon burner, you just need anything that can read the SPD, then it's upto the user to understand that code.

EDIT: If Thaiphoon burner can't read the SPD correctly, then the only sure way to identify the dram chips is by looking at the code. Thaiphoon burner is a poor programme if it can't do a simple task as to read the SPD correctly.

I have to two bits of hardware which can read the the code correctly, first time, every time without failure.
I never trust software to do the job correctly, always hardware if possible, because it's never wrong


.
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#27
Bones
tabascosauzThanks but I'm basically 0 on intel. @Black Haru already has the right ideas, just could benefit from a little more hands on with AMD and less reliance on DRAMcalc, and infinitely more experience than I have on Intel. Also I really just regurgitate what other ppl have said already :D

I think I can offer some insight into the Renoir/Cezanne APUs especially on the IF and iGPU side - but I'm sure w1zz has got cpu testing covered already

can't think of many people with experience working in both camps except @buildzoid
I doubt he would accept since he already does reviews on different hardware pieces on his own channel but then again it can't hurt to ask.
Worst that can happen is for him to say "No".
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#28
Intervention
This sounds exciting. But I do not live in the US. I love memory tweaking and I think I'm a good overclocker.
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#29
Raven Rampkin
delshayJust updated my posting, die revision is at byte 352. ..& no I have never used Thaiphoon burner.
Pardon? Ain't it 160 for DDR4? ;)

Thaiphoon isn't nice in a sense that it has hardcoded algos for guessing dies by model numbers based off the author's research of online store listings and reviews (yup that's what has been mentioned on the official page). They guess right once in a while but mostly nah.
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#30
W1zzard
InterventionThis sounds exciting. But I do not live in the US. I love memory tweaking and I think I'm a good overclocker.
You don't have to be in the US. Let me clarify the original post
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#31
Intervention
W1zzardYou don't have to be in the US. Let me clarify the original post
For what is worth, I own an MSI B550 Unify X which is what I use for testing and overclocking memory. I also have a YouTube channel which, out of respect for the rules, I will not mention here. But it involves memory overclocking, teaching people how to use the AMD DRAM calculator, and also advertise your website LOL since I show in my videos where I download my stuff from. I'd be happy to send you a link just in case you're curious.
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#32
delshay
Raven RampkinPardon? Ain't it 160 for DDR4? ;)

Thaiphoon isn't nice in a sense that it has hardcoded algos for guessing dies by model numbers based off the author's research of online store listings and reviews (yup that's what has been mentioned on the official page). They guess right once in a while but mostly nah.
There no guessing if you can read the code correctly. The code is never wrong. I posted a link to wikipedia already in this thread, so here is a more inadept what you should be entering into the SPD if user(s) don't understand what they should be entering into the SPD. ie it's showing you what to enter at each byte.

I do not follow any timing rules across any DDRx memory modules, because I'm very picky about my timings. Be aware I'm not a programmer, but I do memorize what most bytes do & I know what to enter without looking things up. ..Most of It is in my head.

Anyway here's the PDF & you can go to JEDEC website & download the DDR4 memory PDF for more understanding what each byte does..
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#34
yotano211
I would be down to review laptops and/or sailboats if TPU every gets any.
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#35
Raven Rampkin
delshayBe aware I'm not a programmer, but I do memorize what most bytes do & I know what to enter without looking things up. ..Most of It is in my head.
Thought it's the same for me but got my math wrong (hex instead of dec)... my bad :D Yup that SIMMTester thingy is awesome.
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#36
mclaren85
I can do that without any payment. I'm an electronics engineer and love computers and high tech
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#37
TheLostSwede
mclaren85I can do that without any payment. I'm an electronics engineer and love computers and high tech
You ever done reviews before? I used to do it for a living many moons ago and the publications I worked for didn't do as many tests as TPU.
I was considering it, but looking at all the additional tests that are being done, it's like a week per motherboard and that doesn't including writing it up.
Posted on Reply
#38
VSG
Editor, Reviews & News
TheLostSwedeYou ever done reviews before? I used to do it for a living many moons ago and the publications I worked for didn't do as many tests as TPU.
I was considering it, but looking at all the additional tests that are being done, it's like a week per motherboard and that doesn't including writing it up.
Once you get into the rhythm of it, it can be quicker than that- especially with the writing part.
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#39
TheLostSwede
VSGOnce you get into the rhythm of it, it can be quicker than that- especially with the writing part.
Yeah, you and I might be able to do that, but these are people that most likely have zero writing experience.
It took me a good while to be able to churn out content, it's not something you learn over night.
You can't exactly just waffle on either, which is easy to do when you have "unlimited" space.
I learnt to write at a computer magazine where a review could be 300 words.
A full page review was considered 1,000 words.
On top of that, we had a style guide you had to follow and both editors and sub-editors that went over the content before it was published a month later...
Not trying to be rude here, just realistic, since the job isn't what a lot of people think it is.
Posted on Reply
#40
VSG
Editor, Reviews & News
TheLostSwede
Yeah, you and I might be able to do that, but these are people that most likely have zero writing experience.
It took me a good while to be able to churn out content, it's not something you learn over night.
You can't exactly just waffle on either, which is easy to do when you have "unlimited" space.
I learnt to write at a computer magazine where a review could be 300 words.
A full page review was considered 1,000 words.
On top of that, we had a style guide you had to follow and both editors and sub-editors that went over the content before it was published a month later...
Not trying to be rude here, just realistic, since the job isn't what a lot of people think it is.
This part is valid here also btw, but agreed that it's a commitment for sure.
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#41
Raven Rampkin
I'm doing this with my old Ballistix kit rn and benching+stresstesting takes a whole day per config. Not a pro by any means though.
Posted on Reply
#42
zlobby
mclaren85I can do that without any payment. I'm an electronics engineer and love computers and high tech
Rule #1 If you are good at something never do it for free.
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#43
TheLostSwede
VSGThis part is valid here also btw, but agreed that it's a commitment for sure.
Quite a difference to learn the ropes in an office compared to doing it remotely though.
Not trying to discourage anyone, but rather make people stop and think before they say they can do it.
zlobbyRule #1 If you are good at something never do it for free.
Yeah, it'll always come back to bite you in the ass.
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#44
oxrufiioxo
I don't envy whoever takes either of these jobs but I do look forward to more in-depth Ram/Mobo reviews......

I can't wait I love reading this sort of content.
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#45
Honda_tpu
Wish I could review those rams @ 1.5v :D
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#46
chaosmassive
first name popped in my head is buildzoid, I think he is the authority when it comes to motherboard and memory tuning, his extensive technical knowledge is astounding.
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#47
buildzoid
I'm not productive enough to handle a review per week.
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#48
VSG
Editor, Reviews & News
buildzoidI'm not productive enough to handle a review per week.
We also welcome relevant special articles that are not on any timeline, like with Yuri and his AMD OC articles.
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#49
lynx29
TheLostSwedeQuite a difference to learn the ropes in an office compared to doing it remotely though.
I think my counter argument to this would be, during the interview process before being hired, the employer doing the hiring should have a system in place/request example, something to verify everyone is on same page or capable of being on same page in short order.

So I am not sure this argument makes sense really. The interviewer will sort that out.
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#50
looniam
i wonder what steve bassiri is doing these days . . .
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