Thursday, July 15th 2021

Intel First Graphics Vendor to Release non-Beta GPU Driver for Windows 11

Intel today released version 30.0.100.9684 of the Intel Graphics Drivers suite, which is the first non-beta driver to support Windows 11. With this, Intel beats NVIDIA and AMD to Windows 11 drivers, who don't even list out Windows 11-compatible drivers on their websites. To achieve Windows 11 support, these drivers comply with WDDM 3.0, supporting DirectX 12 Shader Model 6.6 compiler.

WDDM 3.0 lays the foundation of Microsoft's future attempts to standardize dynamic refresh rate and supersampling in games (making DLSS and FSR obsolete). The drivers also enable the Microsoft Auto HDR feature of Windows 11 on 10th Gen Core processors with Iris Plus Graphics (or later). This would mean you'll need at least a Core "Ice Lake," Core "Tiger Lake," or Core "Rocket Lake" processor. "Comet Lake" chips with Gen 9.5 UHD 630 Graphics (or older), don't support Auto HDR. Grab the latest Intel Graphics Drivers from the link below.

DOWNLOAD: Intel Graphics Drivers 30.0.100.9684
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14 Comments on Intel First Graphics Vendor to Release non-Beta GPU Driver for Windows 11

#1
R-T-B
I mean when I ran the beta, the latest nvidia WHQL drivers loaded up as WDDM 3.0, so not too sure about this.

AutoHDR worked too. And this was literally weeks ago.
Posted on Reply
#2
ThrashZone
Hi,
I'm sure solitary never looked better.
Posted on Reply
#3
R-T-B
ThrashZoneHi,
I'm sure solitary never looked better.
Solitary? That's when you get sent to sit in a corner right?
Posted on Reply
#4
ThrashZone
R-T-BSolitary? That's when you get sent to sit in a corner right?
Hi,
If stuck gaming with onboard graphic's no it's solitary confinement lol
Posted on Reply
#5
Rithsom
I wonder why Skyrim was chosen for the Auto HDR comparison here. Isn't it like Oblivion in that it already applies a fake, so-called "HDR" bloom effect to bright surfaces? Doesn't Auto HDR also fake real HDR by making bright objects look really bright by nearly washing them out?

I thought that the only way to achieve real HDR is with a compatible display that meets minimum color gamut, brightness, and contrast ratio specs.
Posted on Reply
#6
zlobby
ThrashZoneHi,
If stuck gaming with onboard graphic's no it's solitary confinement lol
LUL
Posted on Reply
#7
bug
RithsomI wonder why Skyrim was chosen for the Auto HDR comparison here. Isn't it like Oblivion in that it already applies a fake, so-called "HDR" bloom effect to bright surfaces? Doesn't Auto HDR also fake real HDR by making bright objects look really bright by nearly washing them out?

I thought that the only way to achieve real HDR is with a compatible display that meets minimum color gamut, brightness, and contrast ratio specs.
I think this is about stretching otherwise SDR content over HDR space when available. The end result would be quite different.
Posted on Reply
#8
Rithsom
bugI think this is about stretching otherwise SDR content over HDR space when available. The end result would be quite different.
So Auto HDR actually produces visuals in the HDR space and thus requires an HDR display to work, then? In that case, I can definitely understand its use in improving the visuals of old games.
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#9
bug
RithsomSo Auto HDR actually produces visuals in the HDR space and thus requires an HDR display to work, then? In that case, I can definitely understand its use in improving the visuals of old games.
IME (photo work), HDR is not that easy to get right - it tends to look artificial. I'll reserve my judgement on "improving" for after I see this in action ;)

If I had to guess, I'd say they're applying some curves stretching the color space while being conservative about what they do with luminance/brightness.
Posted on Reply
#10
BSim500
RithsomI thought that the only way to achieve real HDR is with a compatible display that meets minimum color gamut, brightness, and contrast ratio specs.
Nearly all "HDR vs non-HDR" marketing comparison shots on a new product that needs selling are pure BS. Skyrim's mountains are nowhere near that washed out as the "SDR" comparison image tries to portray in reality.
Posted on Reply
#11
MrDweezil
RithsomSo Auto HDR actually produces visuals in the HDR space and thus requires an HDR display to work, then? In that case, I can definitely understand its use in improving the visuals of old games.
Yes, Auto HDR outputs an HDR signal and needs an HDR display.
Posted on Reply
#12
R-T-B
RithsomSo Auto HDR actually produces visuals in the HDR space and thus requires an HDR display to work, then? In that case, I can definitely understand its use in improving the visuals of old games.
That's it in a nutshell.
Posted on Reply
#13
Mussels
Freshwater Moderator
Wait dynamic supersampling is part of the new shader model?

howd i miss that news
Posted on Reply
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