Tuesday, July 27th 2021

ViewSonic Releases Blur Busters Approved XG2431 240Hz Gaming Monitor

ViewSonic Corp., a leading global provider of display solutions, announces that the latest gaming monitor, the XG2431, has started shipping. The ultra-sleek 24" display is equipped with an IPS panel that deliver vibrant visuals with an ultra-fast 1 ms response. Approved by industry-renowned Blur Busters* for its motion blur reduction, it gives players the power to compete alongside the pros in the highest levels of First-Person Shooter (FPS), Multiplayer Online Battle Arena (MOBA), and Real-Time Strategy (RTS) genres.

With native Full HD 1080p resolution and 240 Hz refresh rate, professional gamers can gain an edge. The sleek borderless design and wide viewing angles ensure that the XG2431 is ideal for multi-display gaming setups with minimal frame distraction, making it perfect for gaming arenas and tournament play. The ViewSonic XG2431 features AMD FreeSync Premium technology, which synchronizes the output of the GPU graphics card and monitor to eliminate screen tearing and provide smoother frame rates. This 24-inch monitor features the perfect combination of speed, control and color. The super smooth 240 Hz refresh rate allows games to run at an ultra-fast framerate for superior performance, while the 1 ms response time ensures faster and more precise gameplay.
"The XG2431 gaming monitor is the latest monitor engineered specifically for the hard-core gamer," said Ray Hedrick, product manager at ViewSonic. "We loaded the monitor with features and technologies that can keep up with high-end graphics cards and CPUs and make the players ready for any type of game, whether at home streaming or during a competition."

The XG2431 comes with the company's exclusive ViewMode presets, which offer the user a number of customizable gaming modes, including FPS, RTS and MOBA game settings. Connectivity options include HDMI, USB, and DisplayPort for external devices and accessories, and support for laptops, PCs and Macs.

XG2431 Gaming Monitor
  • 24-inch gaming monitor with native 1080p (1920x1080) resolution
  • 240 Hz refresh rate; ultra-fast 1 ms (MPRT) response time
  • AMD FreeSync Premium technology; Blur Busters approved; Exclusive PureXP technology
  • VESA HDR400 Certified
  • Connectivity includes: HDMI 1.4, DisplayPort, USB-A/B and Audio-Out
  • Available now for an estimated street price of $349.99
For more information, visit the product page.
Add your own comment

21 Comments on ViewSonic Releases Blur Busters Approved XG2431 240Hz Gaming Monitor

#1
tehehe
Very nice. Now, please, implement integer scaling on all of your monitors. Especially useful for high res screens (playing 1080p on 2160p screen with no interpolation blur) but not only (retro gaming on real hardware).
Posted on Reply
#2
n-ster
teheheVery nice. Now, please, implement integer scaling on all of your monitors. Especially useful for high res screens (playing 1080p on 2160p screen with no interpolation blur) but not only (retro gaming on real hardware).
The most recent Intel IGPs and modern AMD or Nvidia GPU have support for integer scaling

Not bad, too bad there are no 240Hz monitors with native 8-bit / 8-bit+FRC. Nowadays with HDR it is becoming more important, I believe you need 8-bit+FRC for DisplayHDR500/600+. It's nice to see the market move to higher brightness displays, <250cd/m2 displays were really annoying in a bright office! Still, gaming monitors with 120Hz used to have trash colours, it's nice that you don't have to make that sacrifice anymore
Posted on Reply
#3
TheLostSwede
n-sterThe most recent Intel IGPs and modern AMD or Nvidia GPU have support for integer scaling

Not bad, too bad there are no 240Hz monitors with native 8-bit / 8-bit+FRC. Nowadays with HDR it is becoming more important, I believe you need 8-bit+FRC for DisplayHDR500/600+. It's nice to see the market move to higher brightness displays, <250cd/m2 displays were really annoying in a bright office! Still, gaming monitors with 120Hz used to have trash colours, it's nice that you don't have to make that sacrifice anymore
Yeah, too bad there are no displays like this one...
displaysolutions.samsung.com/monitor/detail/1642/C27G75T
Or this one
www.dell.com/en-us/shop/alienware-27-gaming-monitor-aw2721d/apd/210-axsw/monitors-monitor-accessories
Or even this one
www.acer.com/ac/en/US/content/predator-model/UM.JX3AA.X01
Posted on Reply
#5
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
teheheVery nice. Now, please, implement integer scaling on all of your monitors. Especially useful for high res screens (playing 1080p on 2160p screen with no interpolation blur) but not only (retro gaming on real hardware).
Exactly. Why do mfrs insist on turning on this useless feature with no way to turn it off? And TVs are just as bad. It's bugged me for years. This means that watching a 1080p picture from my DVR on my 4K TV is actually less clear than watching it on a native 1080p TV, which is ridiculous.

Before integer scaling on modern graphics cards came along, it was sometimes possible for it to be switched off if the signal was just right, perhaps a bit non-standard, proving that the hardware did support not doing this extra work. In fact, I'd like to know exactly how the AA is turned off with modern cards. I suspect that maybe the monitor is actually receiving a native resolution signal from the card, with the card scaling the desired, lower resolution, without AA to the native resolution.

And finally, why the hell can't older cards do this? I so no technical reason and suspect that it's just marketing to entice users to upgrade.
Posted on Reply
#6
tehehe
n-sterThe most recent Intel IGPs and modern AMD or Nvidia GPU have support for integer scaling
How I will scale Dreamcast connected to my monitor using AMD or NVidia GPU? How I will scale my PC games on my 1080 ti (integer scaling is not supported on all gpus)?
Posted on Reply
#7
n-ster
teheheHow I will scale Dreamcast connected to my monitor using AMD or NVidia GPU? How I will scale my PC games on my 1080 ti (integer scaling is not supported on all gpus)?
Nvidia sucks, supposedly there is extra hardware that made it easier I guess and they didn't bother doing it different for Pascal and older cards. I cry with you and my GTX 970 that is still a capable GPU. 2019 and later essentially, which is quite pathetic. Intel similarly only has support starting late 2019 with Ice Lake 10XXGX cpus, but I feel like them being CPU focused and the IGP needing to be very cost efficient, it's more understandable.

At least AMD supports it with their 7000 series and later! That's a late 2011 / early 2012 GPU.

I genuinely don't know, are there many monitors with integer scaling mode?
Posted on Reply
#8
tehehe
n-sterNvidia sucks, supposedly there is extra hardware that made it easier I guess and they didn't bother doing it different for Pascal and older cards. I cry with you and my GTX 970 that is still a capable GPU. 2019 and later essentially, which is quite pathetic. Intel similarly only has support starting late 2019 with Ice Lake 10XXGX cpus, but I feel like them being CPU focused and the IGP needing to be very cost efficient, it's more understandable.

At least AMD supports it with their 7000 series and later! That's a late 2011 / early 2012 GPU.

I genuinely don't know, are there many monitors with integer scaling mode?
There is literally only ONE. Eve Spectrum 4k. Company doesn't have the best track record of delivering though. Scaling belongs to the monitor not to the gpu. That way you can scale anything that is connected to the monitor not only what works on your gpu.
Posted on Reply
#9
InVasMani
Just got a 27" 165Hz QHD IPS DP 1.4 yesterday it's alright...






Posted on Reply
#10
ixi
350 for full hd. Kokooooooooooooooo avooooooo, failure not product.
Posted on Reply
#11
lynx29
InVasManiJust got a 27" 165Hz QHD IPS DP 1.4 yesterday it's alright...






you were able tog et all of those resolutions stable on a 165hz qhd monitor? how did you get the 4k one to work? the monitor literally only has 2560x1440 built into it...

the 1440 238hz was stable? UFO tests showed it was accurate too?

that sounds insane if true... what model did you buy? are you using toastyx cru? or no tweaks at all? just changing the rez in graphics control panel?
Posted on Reply
#12
BorisDG
InVasManiJust got a 27" 165Hz QHD IPS DP 1.4 yesterday it's alright...






I don't wish to know how much pixels you have killed. :roll:
Posted on Reply
#13
lynx29
BorisDGI don't wish to know how much pixels you have killed. :roll:
nah, never heard of that. I overclocked a couple different korean monitors imported direct from south korea QNIX and X-Star brands from a long long long time ago. they were overclocked for years just fine.
Posted on Reply
#14
InVasMani
lynx29you were able tog et all of those resolutions stable on a 165hz qhd monitor? how did you get the 4k one to work? the monitor literally only has 2560x1440 built into it...

the 1440 238hz was stable? UFO tests showed it was accurate too?

that sounds insane if true... what model did you buy? are you using toastyx cru? or no tweaks at all? just changing the rez in graphics control panel?
I haven't tried any formal stability testing just some basic testing to see if it would take to the resolution or not and verified it in the windows advanced display settings as well as the monitor's menu settings which displays the Hz sometimes it's off a few Hz from the windows setting on the panel itself. I'm guessing it's a bit like memory overclocking where it's not always perfectly linear incremental steps. I only tested QHD at 200Hz with UFO test, but worked fine. No CRU just Nvidia Control Panel and with reduce blanking. I don't doubt that the 238Hz would register with UFO test.

Certainly no concrete testing at this point, but fact it would post a signal at all was unexpected and impressive enough to me. At that point it was hard to resist seeing just how far it would go and what else it would do. It's shockingly flexible from what I've seen at least. It's defiantly a bit more sharp at the panel's native resolution. As for the 4K I just tested it and it worked. It even displays it in the monitor menu along with the Hz. It came with like 3ft DP 1.4 cable so maybe the length being shorter helped with the DP 1.4.
BorisDGI don't wish to know how much pixels you have killed. :roll:
None that I'm aware of:fear:don't jinx it though...or just blame New World for it.

255Hz 2341 x 1317 @255Hz


Posted on Reply
#15
lynx29
InVasManiI haven't tried any formal stability testing just some basic testing to see if it would take to the resolution or not and verified it in the windows advanced display settings as well as the monitor's menu settings which displays the Hz sometimes it's off a few Hz from the windows setting on the panel itself. I'm guessing it's a bit like memory overclocking where it's not always perfectly linear incremental steps. I only tested QHD at 200Hz with UFO test, but worked fine. No CRU just Nvidia Control Panel and with reduce blanking. I don't doubt that the 238Hz would register with UFO test.

Certainly no concrete testing at this point, but fact it would post a signal at all was unexpected and impressive enough to me. At that point it was hard to resist seeing just how far it would go and what else it would do. It's shockingly flexible from what I've seen at least. It's defiantly a bit more sharp at the panel's native resolution. As for the 4K I just tested it and it worked. It even displays it in the monitor menu along with the Hz. It came with like 3ft DP 1.4 cable so maybe the length being shorter helped with the DP 1.4.

None that I'm aware of:fear:don't jinx it though...or just blame New World for it.

255Hz 2341 x 1317 @255Hz


What model/brand monitor is it? That's amazing!
Posted on Reply
#16
Axaion
InVasManiI haven't tried any formal stability testing just some basic testing to see if it would take to the resolution or not and verified it in the windows advanced display settings as well as the monitor's menu settings which displays the Hz sometimes it's off a few Hz from the windows setting on the panel itself. I'm guessing it's a bit like memory overclocking where it's not always perfectly linear incremental steps. I only tested QHD at 200Hz with UFO test, but worked fine. No CRU just Nvidia Control Panel and with reduce blanking. I don't doubt that the 238Hz would register with UFO test.

Certainly no concrete testing at this point, but fact it would post a signal at all was unexpected and impressive enough to me. At that point it was hard to resist seeing just how far it would go and what else it would do. It's shockingly flexible from what I've seen at least. It's defiantly a bit more sharp at the panel's native resolution. As for the 4K I just tested it and it worked. It even displays it in the monitor menu along with the Hz. It came with like 3ft DP 1.4 cable so maybe the length being shorter helped with the DP 1.4.

None that I'm aware of:fear:don't jinx it though...or just blame New World for it.

255Hz 2341 x 1317 @255Hz


Youre doing this wrong.
Go to www.testufo.com/ghosting
set PPS to 960 if its not already
1; take a VIDEO with a shutter setting that captures 4 frames of your refresh rate (1/60 for 240hz etc.)
2; FOLLOW the UFO with your camera (IN A VIDEO) so the dots lines up to straight | | | | lines
3; Export the frame that looks closest to IRL

Also follow the instructions from here: www.testufo.com/frameskipping because im 99.999999% sure youre frameskipping.


As for the XG2431, Viewsonic apparently only thinks the US exists, everyone else can go pound dirt. :\
Posted on Reply
#17
lynx29
AxaionYoure doing this wrong.
Go to www.testufo.com/ghosting
set PPS to 960 if its not already
1; take a VIDEO with a shutter setting that captures 4 frames of your refresh rate (1/60 for 240hz etc.)
2; FOLLOW the UFO with your camera (IN A VIDEO) so the dots lines up to straight | | | | lines
3; Export the frame that looks closest to IRL

Also follow the instructions from here: www.testufo.com/frameskipping because im 99.999999% sure youre frameskipping.


As for the XG2431, Viewsonic apparently only thinks the US exists, everyone else can go pound dirt. :\
probably is some frame skipping going on, but still interesting. a lower OC will prob achieve no frame skipping but still be above default. worth finding that sweet spot imo if he is willing to try and has the gear to confirm the frame skipping. not everyone has cameras with that good of shutter speed.
Posted on Reply
#18
Axaion
lynx29probably is some frame skipping going on, but still interesting. a lower OC will prob achieve no frame skipping but still be above default. worth finding that sweet spot imo if he is willing to try and has the gear to confirm the frame skipping. not everyone has cameras with that good of shutter speed.
you can use a phone
Posted on Reply
#19
lynx29
Axaionyou can use a phone
hmm perhaps. I don't know if my phone is personally good enough for that test or not to be honest. I know it doesn't offer 60 fps videos. only 30 fps at any of the resolutions. just depends if you have a good phone or not. those can be quite expensive... I mean Nokia just launched a new phone recently I was looking at, the Nokia C30... and I don't think that even supports this. and its a 2021 phone with 3 years OS support.
Posted on Reply
#21
InVasMani
I believe it's frame skipping and appears like it was the native 165Hz as well. If I lower it to 158Hz it look like it might be ok? Is frame skipping terrible or just not ideal? Is it like clear motion that's used to help with faster motion sports or different entirely to it?


Tested it a bit further and settled on reducing 1Hz lower to 157Hz and it looks and feels better. I'm not even disappointed that I had to reduce the refresh rate from 165Hz native to 157Hz with how much better it both looks and feels. The display clarity just seems a touch nicer over native and the input lag feels much smoother.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment
Copyright © 2004-2021 www.techpowerup.com. All rights reserved.
All trademarks used are properties of their respective owners.