Thursday, September 2nd 2021

VESA Announces DisplayHDR True Black 600 Performance Tier

The Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) announced today that it has added a new 600 performance level to its DisplayHDR True Black high dynamic range (HDR) specification and standard. Based on VESA's widely adopted High-Performance Monitor and Display Compliance Test Specification (DisplayHDR), the DisplayHDR True Black standard is optimized for emissive display technologies, such as organic light emitting diode (OLED) and future microLED displays.

The new DisplayHDR True Black 600 tier offers higher luminance than the existing DisplayHDR and DisplayHDR True Black 400 and 500 tiers. DisplayHDR and DisplayHDR True Black are the display industry's first fully open standards specifying HDR quality for LCD and emissive displays, respectively. VESA also announced today that three products have already been certified to the new DisplayHDR True Black 600 performance level - the ASUS Vivobook Pro 14, Vivobook Pro 14X and Vivobook 15 laptops. ASUS is formally unveiling these products at a separate company event today.
DisplayHDR True Black allows for up to 100X deeper black levels in addition to a greater dynamic range and a 4X improvement in rise time compared to VESA's DisplayHDR 1000 performance tier. This enables a visually stunning experience for home theater and gaming enthusiasts. The new DisplayHDR True Black 600 level requires a 20 percent increase in luminance compared to the True Black 500 level, which results in a noticeably brighter screen while maintaining the same outstanding black level and color quality typified in OLED displays.
Source: VESA
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27 Comments on VESA Announces DisplayHDR True Black 600 Performance Tier

#1
Khonjel
Correct me if I'm wrong but it's basically DisplayHDR TB is just DisplayHDR but for OLED screens?
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#2
R-T-B
KhonjelCorrect me if I'm wrong but it's basically DisplayHDR TB is just DisplayHDR but for OLED screens?
Anything that can turn a pixel off an achieve infinite black really. Right now that's mostly (if not all) OLED.
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#3
Khonjel
R-T-BAnything that can turn a pixel off an achieve infinite black really. Right now that's mostly (if not all) OLED.
I meant the certification VESA created.
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#4
Dammeron
R-T-BAnything that can turn a pixel off an achieve infinite black really. Right now that's mostly (if not all) OLED.
Technically good VA after calibration should also be very close to full black.
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#5
Tardian
R-T-BAnything that can turn a pixel off an achieve infinite black really. Right now that's mostly (if not all) OLED.
Technically good VA after calibration should also be very close to full black.

I have both and I based on what I see I agree with R-T-B! OLED has true blacks, VA screens are truly excellent but don't have true blacks.
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#6
Dammeron
TardianTechnically good VA after calibration should also be very close to full black.

I have both and I based on what I see agree with R-T-B! OLED has true blacks, VA screens are truly excellent but don't have true blacks.
That's where the "very close" comes in. :)
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#7
Tardian
That's where the "very close" comes in.
How do you get a truly black menu and taskbars on a VA screen? I can get blacks in small areas like my signature.
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#8
Vayra86
KhonjelCorrect me if I'm wrong but it's basically DisplayHDR TB is just DisplayHDR but for OLED screens?
Yep they needed another label because any lcd basically qualifies for what they had without True Black stuck onto it.

So now you have 8? 10? Labels saying a display is this or that. Oh how deep the display rabbit holes always go. As if we didnt learn from HD Ready...

Vesa has lost all credibility with me.
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#9
R-T-B
DammeronTechnically good VA after calibration should also be very close to full black.
Very close yes, but still not true black. VA used to be my preference but it still can't touch plasma let alone OLED. Then again, diminishing returns and all that. It's very close.
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#11
zlobby
Netflix rejoice!
R-T-BVery close yes, but still not true black. VA used to be my preference but it still can't touch plasma let alone OLED. Then again, diminishing returns and all that. It's very close.
I wonder when they will imement vantablack?
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#12
Tardian
infinite black v vantablack
Even black holes aren't infinite black because:
Matter that falls onto a black hole can form an external accretion disk heated by friction, forming quasars, some of the brightest objects in the universe.
No, if you want infinite black then you have to gaze into the heart of one of my kin! Even ESO 444-46 avoids them and treats them with respect.

Vantablack is useful for lenses.
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#13
Vayra86
Okay okay. True black in displays is a 'pixel that does not emit any light'. :D
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#14
zlobby
TardianEven black holes aren't infinite black because:
Apart from the Hawking radiation all light trying to 'escape' is redshifted to infinity. So yeah, not absolutely black but nothing else we know of comes close.
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#15
R-T-B
TardianWhen you are referring to Plasma are you referring to the Pioneer Kuro range and then subsequent Panasonic clones.
Technically, Panasonic came first, but Kuro was better (at least until the very final Panasonics). Nit picking but yeah.
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#16
Tardian
Technically, Panasonic came first, but Kuro was better (at least until the very final Panasonics). Nit picking but yeah.
The raison d'être of TPU forums?;)
Apart from the Hawking radiation all light trying to 'escape' is redshifted to infinity. So yeah, not absolutely black but nothing else we know of comes close.
Not even close. Lex will confirm that on this issue (as usual) I am right!
Sods law. Captain Tom Moore's got the Coronavirus.
according to news, he has not been vaccinated as he is fighting Pneumonia atm
He is not in Intensive care but is being intensively monitored.
Insensitive comment of the decade:
Major, a military rank standing above captain. It is the lowest field-grade rank.
www.britannica.com/topic/major
Though I'm past one hundred thousand miles
I'm feeling very still
And I think my spaceship knows which way to go
Tell my wife I love her very much she knows
Ground Control to Major Tom
Your circuit's dead, there's something wrong
Can you hear me, Major Tom?
Can you hear me, Major Tom?
Can you hear me, Major Tom?
Can you "Here am I floating 'round my tin can
Far above the moon
Planet Earth is blue
And there's nothing I can do"
Songwriters: David Bowie
Space Oddity lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, T.R.O. Inc.
Only being right 90% of the time. Is that an "I only human" thing?
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#17
Tardian


Luminance + Color Gamut + Bit Depth + Rise Time

In addition, the scope of the DisplayHDR logo is significantly broader than merely a peak luminance patch test. We also apply rigorous full-screen flash tests, full-screen long-duration tests, and color tests using the exact color primary data from the Extended Display Identification Data (EDID) to determine exactly how Microsoft Windows will portray images on the display. With the current version of the DisplayHDR spec, CTS v1.1, we also test that the HDR dimming works dynamically to ensure that it’s not just a super bright 1000 nits SDR display, but rather that it genuinely behaves as an HDR display using active dimming when the video signal luminance levels fluctuate in normal usage. A summary list of all of the tests that must be passed is available on the DisplayHDR website. All of these performance criteria are stated as minimum requirements for the logo, in that every performance criterion needs to be met by certified displays.

The DisplayHDR specification for LCDs establishes distinct levels of HDR system performance to facilitate the adoption of HDR throughout the PC market: DisplayHDR 400, DisplayHDR 500, DisplayHDR 600, DisplayHDR 1000, and DisplayHDR 1400. The DisplayHDR True Black specification for OLED and other emissive displays includes three levels of HDR system performance: DisplayHDR True Black 400, DisplayHDR True Black 500, and DisplayHDR True Black 600. Additional tiers are expected to be added later for both standards to support continuous innovations and improvements in display performance. All tiers require the support of the industry-standard HDR10 format.

displayhdr.org/not-all-hdr-is-created-equal/

Overview of Performance Criteria Under CTS 1.1

The DisplayHDR 1.1 specification includes a number of key performance updates, such as:
  • Active dimming – DisplayHDR now mandates active dimming performance levels, a feature that when adopted in displays can reduce power consumption and yield significantly darker black levels
  • DisplayID accuracy – ensures that accurate luminance and color gamut data is populated in the DisplayID or legacy Extended Display Identification Data (EDID), which enables the GPU to optimize the video signal for that display to ensure the highest display performance
  • Dual corner box test – the black-level test has been updated with larger corner box structures to allow for accurate colorimeter measurement of both black and white levels, resulting in improved dynamic contrast ratio testing
  • New color gamut specifications – DisplayHDR now includes a 10 percent color patch test in addition to the 100 percent full-screen color test, with both tests now using the display’s maximum luminance and RGB primary color values from the DisplayID/EDID; this revised test method more accurately determines the color gamut that will render on the display when running Windows
  • Combined color luminance – DisplayHDR has added a mechanism to validate full-color volume at the full logo level luminance
    New Delta-ITP test – added to test that the luminance level on the display is correctly rendered, helping to ensure the faithful reproduction of the original content creator’s intent (luminance, and D65 white balance)
  • On-screen display (OSD) mode indication – any DisplayHDR-certified monitor with an on-screen menu function must now clearly indicate which modes support DisplayHDR, making it easier for users to optimize their display settings
  • DisplayPort certification specification – any DisplayHDR-certified monitor that has a DisplayPort interface must also undergo DisplayPort certification, ensuring that the display performs optimally with VESA DisplayPort-certified cables and other peripherals
displayhdr.org/performance-criteria/
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#18
zlobby
Yeah, it's USB all over again...
TardianNot even close. Lex will confirm that on this issue (as usual) I am right!
Lex who?
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#20
Prima.Vera
DammeronTechnically good VA after calibration should also be very close to full black.
Only if it has per-pixel LED illumination, which I'm not sure how many monitors/TV have that out there....
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#21
R0H1T
zlobbyYeah, it's USB all over again...
Well it's not quite there yet, I'll give it a year or two!
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#22
zlobby
Tardianlexluthermiester
Ahh, I see. You may want to use '@' next time. This way you will also give them a heads up that you are mentioning them somewhere.

As for the so called black holes, I'm no Penrose or Hawking but I know a thing or two about holes. What you said about the accretion disk is true but it require the presence of matter around the hole. Without it it's as black gets.
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#23
Tardian
Ahh, I see. You may want to use '@' next time. This way you will also give them a heads up that you are mentioning them somewhere. As for the so called black holes, I'm no Penrose or Hawking but I know a thing or two about holes. What you said about the accretion disk is true but it require the presence of matter around the hole. Without it it's as black gets.
Nature abhors a vacuum.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horror_vacui_(physics)

Black holes are all spinning and have no charge. I can't imagine a real situation where there would be one surrounded by a vacuum. Google EHT image of a BH.


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#24
zlobby
TardianNature abhors a vacuum.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horror_vacui_(physics)

Black holes are all spinning and have no charge. I can't imagine a real situation where there would be one surrounded by a vacuum. Google EHT image of a BH.


Now that's where you are wrong. Black holes DO hold a charge. In fact it's the one of only 3 properties we can know for them fat mofos, i.e. spin, mass and charge.

Son, I'm disappoint. ;)
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