Tuesday, November 23rd 2021

FSP introduces U3 series adapter that's 50% smaller but just as efficient as the previous generation

FSP Group, a leading manufacturer of power supplies, announced the launch of the new FSP U3 series adapter today. The new U3 series adapter is 50% smaller than its predecessors, making the high-performance CoC tier 2, DOE VI and Energy Star certified adapter one of the most efficient, compact and reliable options available.

With the computing performance of computers and electronic devices becoming more and more powerful, the power wattage they require is also increasing. The FSP U3 Series goes against this trend by offering high load capacity and efficiency in a significantly smaller package. To address the ever-growing need for power efficiency in a smaller footprint, FSP Group, has unveiled its smallest-ever power adapter - the FSP U3 Series Ultra-Slim Adapter.
Available in 90 W, 120 W, 135 W, 150 W and 180 W variants, the FSP U3 series is up to 50% smaller than the regular FSP N3 models, giving it a significant advantage over similar adapters. The smaller and lighter weight gives clients considerable savings in package, shipping, delivery, and storage costs. In addition, the thoughtful L-angle wire design can reduce the damage of the wire joints and improve users' satisfactions.

Measuring smaller than a smartphone and only 1-inch thick, the new FSP U3 series adapter feature a mature and reliable technology, which provides a conversion efficiency above 90%, adding to its energy efficiency and preventing energy loss. The EMC and IEC standard charger, also has advanced power and temperature surge protection and built in PFC circuit.

FSP U3 series is set to build upon the successes of its predecessor by streamlining power systems in almost any application. They are perfect for AIO computers, gaming NB, NUC, point-of-sale (POS) machines and various consumer devices. Aside from its ultra slim volume efficiency, the U3 Series is also approved for use in multiple countries and meets UL, TUV, CCC, FCC, CE, and CB safety certificates. The U3 Series is no doubt a compact and powerful adapter. FSP provides comprehensive standard item and micro-customization services. The company welcomes system operators to discuss cooperation opportunities with them.

Source: FSP
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6 Comments on FSP introduces U3 series adapter that's 50% smaller but just as efficient as the previous generation

#1
Chrispy_
I have an LG Gram14 with USB-C charging but the supplied 65W charger is huge.

I think there's a market for low-powered charging in order to benefit a tiny, lightweight power pack. The Gram14 charges off a miniscule 15W phone charger. Yes, it'll take 6 hours to charge at that speed but for something that is charged overnight, or mostly left plugged in whilst at a desk/table then that's an almost insignificant downside to reap the benefits of no longer having to carry around a full-size power brick (which are often far bulkier than the laptop they're charging).

Based on the slim size here for 90W, I'd love to see how small FSP can make, say, a 30W charger.
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#2
TheLostSwede
Chrispy_I have an LG Gram14 with USB-C charging but the supplied 65W charger is huge.

I think there's a market for low-powered charging in order to benefit a tiny, lightweight power pack. The Gram14 charges off a miniscule 15W phone charger. Yes, it'll take 6 hours to charge at that speed but for something that is charged overnight, or mostly left plugged in whilst at a desk/table then that's an almost insignificant downside to reap the benefits of no longer having to carry around a full-size power brick (which are often far bulkier than the laptop they're charging).

Based on the slim size here for 90W, I'd love to see how small FSP can make, say, a 30W charger.
There are already plenty of small 65 and 30 Watt GaN chargers, which I guess these also are. However, most of those are USB-C only, which until recently couldn't deliver enough power to charge most higher-end notebooks. I guess these are intended for notebooks that don't support USB-C charging.
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#3
Vya Domus
Smaller power supplies are usually not a good idea because something has to give, either you get more concentrated heat or lower lifespan.
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#4
Xajel
TheLostSwedeThere are already plenty of small 65 and 30 Watt GaN chargers, which I guess these also are. However, most of those are USB-C only, which until recently couldn't deliver enough power to charge most higher-end notebooks. I guess these are intended for notebooks that don't support USB-C charging.
Barrel chargers/PSU are cheaper than USB-C chargers, not just for the connector but the PD controller chip also, that's why some devices doesn't use it, especially for non-portable devices.

But really, this looks like just another GaN charger but with a barrel plug. And there're plenty of USB-C GaN chargers out there with 30, 45, 65 & 100W power, and more power (upto 240W) is coming with the latest USB-C PD spec.

But if someone really need a compact GaN PSU for a barrel jack powered device like now, you actually can.

There are USB PD to barrel jack cables available with different voltages, these are designed mainly for laptops that doesn't have USB PD charging, There are version for 18v, 19v, 19.5v & 20v for different laptops designs, and these will work as long as the USB PD charger support he required voltage output.
While they're designed for laptops, these are just like any barrel jack PSU, I personally have a 20v cable to power my soldering iron which can be powered with 12v-24v power input. I just use my compact 65W GaN USB-C charger and it works like a charm giving 20V at 3A for 60W, no need to carry the bulky 24v PSU with me everywhere, and that bulky PSU only provides extra 5W of power.
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#5
Chrispy_
Vya DomusSmaller power supplies are usually not a good idea because something has to give, either you get more concentrated heat or lower lifespan.
Not true, gallium nitride (GaN) transistors for switching and these are vastly more efficient meaning fewer are needed to deliver the required output and each of them waste less power/generate less heat than the cheapo silicon transistors.

There are no downsides other than cost. Here's a 20W GaN adapter that's smaller and cooler delivering 20W than a regular freebie (that came with a phone, I guess):

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#6
Post Nut Clairvoyance
Chrispy_Not true, gallium nitride (GaN) transistors for switching and these are vastly more efficient meaning fewer are needed to deliver the required output and each of them waste less power/generate less heat than the cheapo silicon transistors.

There are no downsides other than cost. Here's a 20W GaN adapter that's smaller and cooler delivering 20W than a regular freebie (that came with a phone, I guess):

and even then, GaN is supposed to become cheaper.
one day I may switch to a new laptop and say goodbye to the macbook 95w magsafe, and have a single GaN for laptop (intending to buy sub-28w envelop CPU laptop), phone and whatever else, that is the size of phone adapter.
I remember sister's 12 inch macbook (remember those? with core-m, completely passive machines that are almost like a mac tablet sans any sort of touch) taking charge from a peak 22.5w Mi charger, as these days even most phone chargers can do 12v, although the battery of said machine is 7 or so volts, so it may well have charged at 9v, peaking 20w, albeit it was rather slow.

The modern machines are exceedingly efficient too, so I am happy we're doing away with eldritch solution of many adapter with many connectors.
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