Sunday, January 2nd 2022

Samsung Electronics Showcases Monitor Leadership at CES With Versatile 2022 Lineup

Samsung Electronics today announced new models in its monitor lineup that exemplify its leadership within the sector. The versatile new lineup delivers beautiful picture quality and intuitive features that give consumers more choice when selecting a monitor that fits their exact needs.

The 2022 monitor portfolio brings out the best experiences while working, gaming or watching content at home. Samsung's latest monitors include features for high-performance gaming as well as smart and pro-level elements, such as the Odyssey's Quantum Mini LED backlight panel and HDR 2000; the Smart Monitor's do-it-all screen with smart features; and the High Resolution Monitor's comfortable ergonomics.
"Samsung's 2022 lineup represents the next generation in monitor innovation with offerings that meet the demands of competitive gamers, professional designers and everyone in between," said Hyesung Ha, Executive Vice President of Visual Display Business at Samsung Electronics. "As the work and entertainment worlds continue to evolve, we are proud to deliver monitors that boost users' experiences from the comfort of their homes."

Odyssey Neo G8
As the world's first monitor to feature a 4K (3,840 x 2,160) 1000R curved screen with 240 Hz refresh rate and 1 ms response time (GtG), Odyssey Neo G8 32" (Model Name: G85NB) is set to open a new chapter in gaming monitor innovation, offering razor-sharp performance for even the most dedicated PC gamers. Its performance matches its stunning picture quality featuring Quantum Mini LEDs, Quantum HDR 2000 with a 2,000nit peak brightness and a million-to-one static contrast ratio, bringing out the most subtle details for increased world building and immersion.

The new Odyssey Neo G8 is built with a similar design language as the Odyssey Neo G9, offering a sleek white exterior that stands out even when it's turned off. Beautiful colors leap off the screen into a user's real environment with CoreSync lighting. The core lighting found on the backside of the monitor automatically detects colors on the screen and projects them in real life to create a deeper sense of immersion.

Smart Monitor M8
With an ultra-slim thickness of 11.4 mm, which is about three-quarters thinner than the previous model, the 2022 Smart Monitor M8 32" (Model Name: M80B) provides space efficiency. Especially for those who value style, it features a sophisticated flat-back design with enhanced usability and comes in a new warm white color that fits perfectly everywhere. The brilliant UHD panel provides 99% sRGB color gamut while supporting 1.07 billion colors at 400nit brightness, showing every video, document or photo with true-to-life accuracy.

Smart TV and productivity apps are built directly into the monitor, enabling seamless entertainment and work while serving as a SmartThings control hub, even without the need of a PC. The 2022 Smart Monitor M8 32" is a great option for remote working. It comes with a movable magnetic SlimFit Cam that enables crystal-clear video calls when working from home. Its built-in Video Call application supports the most popular calling apps, including Google Duo. With a USB Type-C port enabling 65 W charging connections, the Smart Monitor M8 provides a streamlined all-in-one workstation experience that doesn't require an additional docking station.

High Resolution Monitor S8
The Samsung High Resolution Monitor S8 (Model Name: S80PB), available in 27" and 32" models, delivers professional-level UHD performance for creators and designers who need the highest levels of accuracy and range when working in the office or at home. Delivering up to 98% of the DCI-P3 color gamut, the S80PB provides an ultra-wide range of rich and nuanced colors. With Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) Display HDR 600,1 this high-resolution monitor provides an immersive viewing experience, bringing content to life as it was intended. As the world's first UL (Underwriter Laboratories) verified Glare Free monitor, Matte Display is applied on the top of the panel, reducing light reflection even when not using a monitor hood, to provide a distraction-free working environment.

Both models feature USB Type-C 90 W charging and LAN ports to help users create a simplified workstation that can charge laptops and mobile devices with no additional docking station required.

Built with the VESA mount compatibility standards, as well as a Height Adjustable Stand (HAS) featuring tilt, swivel and pivot control points, users can mount their monitor to suit any environment.
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14 Comments on Samsung Electronics Showcases Monitor Leadership at CES With Versatile 2022 Lineup

#1
Crackong
And where is the rumored 34 inch QD-OLED ?
Posted on Reply
#2
Garrus
No flat 27 or 32 inch models, what everyone has been asking for. Another curved one. "new models in its monitor lineup that exemplify its leadership within the sector" ?

LG should release a press release "we are the best" and have that be your headline...
Posted on Reply
#3
Laykun
Unless they've stopped using the garbage VA panels they had in their previous Odyssey line then this is just going to be another year of garbage screens. The G7 was a laughable mess of a monitor, there were SO MANY issues with it beyond simple panel quality that it made the thing unusable.
Posted on Reply
#4
TheLostSwede
LaykunUnless they've stopped using the garbage VA panels they had in their previous Odyssey line then this is just going to be another year of garbage screens. The G7 was a laughable mess of a monitor, there were SO MANY issues with it beyond simple panel quality that it made the thing unusable.
It's miniLED so most likely not VA. It suggests it should be much more expensive though.
Posted on Reply
#5
konga
TheLostSwedeIt's miniLED so most likely not VA. It suggests it should be much more expensive though.
Samsung's Neo QLED line pairs VA (or a strongly VA-like tech) with a mini LED backlight. Their Odyssey Neo G9 was also VA with mini LED. The panel isn't as bad as this other poster is saying, though. It's not as responsive as IPS or TN panels, but it's still a big step up from other VA panels. It still has some of the hallmarks of VA, such as dark-level smearing with overdrive disabled, but the overdrive tends to be pretty good on their G7 and G9 panels. Since this one is going to be the next evolution of those panels, I expect its motion performance to be fairly acceptable with very little smearing and some but not too much overshoot when configured to the optimal overdrive mode. The main benefit of going with VA is much higher native contrast, which helps the mini LED backlight a lot, eliminating much of the blooming you see on IPS displays with FALD technology. The 240hz is almost a side bonus; a little bit of future-proofing so you don't feel compelled to go out and buy a new 4K monitor just a few years later after picking up a 5080 or whatever.

edit: The QC issues with the previous Odyssey monitors were pretty serious though, I'll admit. It's not because those panels were VA, but because Samsung is trying to do a lot of new things at once, and they're too focused on putting ridiculously specced, cutting-edge products on the market and not focused enough on just getting the fundamentals right. There were issues with scanlines, display flickering, stuttery frame pacing with VRR enabled, and a ton of issues with the HDR implementation on the Neo G9. So it's worth looking at the G8 with a bit of skepticism. They really need to get this one right if they don't want to burn all remaining goodwill.
Posted on Reply
#6
bug
The S8 might be interesting, but since backlight is not talked about, it's probably yet another crappy edge lit solution.
Posted on Reply
#7
Chomiq
Just an FYI, only 32" variant of S8 is HDR600, 27" is HDR400.
Posted on Reply
#8
GerKNG
4K 240Hz and all that stuff that sounds amazing...
But Samsungs Monitor QA is worse than Gigabytes Powersupply QA...
Posted on Reply
#9
Mistral
If the S80PB does 120Hz with a decent response time, I might bite...
Posted on Reply
#10
Zubasa
GerKNG4K 240Hz and all that stuff that sounds amazing...
But Samsungs Monitor QA is worse than Gigabytes Powersupply QA...
I would say Gigabyte's PSUs are more consistent then Samsung monitors, they reliably explode.
With Samsung monitors you never know what kind of lemon you get. :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#11
Vayra86
kongaSamsung's Neo QLED line pairs VA (or a strongly VA-like tech) with a mini LED backlight. Their Odyssey Neo G9 was also VA with mini LED. The panel isn't as bad as this other poster is saying, though. It's not as responsive as IPS or TN panels, but it's still a big step up from other VA panels. It still has some of the hallmarks of VA, such as dark-level smearing with overdrive disabled, but the overdrive tends to be pretty good on their G7 and G9 panels. Since this one is going to be the next evolution of those panels, I expect its motion performance to be fairly acceptable with very little smearing and some but not too much overshoot when configured to the optimal overdrive mode. The main benefit of going with VA is much higher native contrast, which helps the mini LED backlight a lot, eliminating much of the blooming you see on IPS displays with FALD technology. The 240hz is almost a side bonus; a little bit of future-proofing so you don't feel compelled to go out and buy a new 4K monitor just a few years later after picking up a 5080 or whatever.

edit: The QC issues with the previous Odyssey monitors were pretty serious though, I'll admit. It's not because those panels were VA, but because Samsung is trying to do a lot of new things at once, and they're too focused on putting ridiculously specced, cutting-edge products on the market and not focused enough on just getting the fundamentals right. There were issues with scanlines, display flickering, stuttery frame pacing with VRR enabled, and a ton of issues with the HDR implementation on the Neo G9. So it's worth looking at the G8 with a bit of skepticism. They really need to get this one right if they don't want to burn all remaining goodwill.
I have no smearing on my Gigabyte VA either, even when not using BFI. It uses a Samsung panel of yesteryear.

mini LED is just LED backlight with a new marketing name, we've had it since forever. I got the impression that since the DCI P3 VA-panels started getting produced for consumer, the smearing has been going away in more and more implementations. These panels are also known for being pretty bad at sRGB, you really want to stay with DCI P3.
Posted on Reply
#12
konga
Vayra86I have no smearing on my Gigabyte VA either, even when not using BFI. It uses a Samsung panel of yesteryear.

mini LED is just LED backlight with a new marketing name, we've had it since forever. I got the impression that since the DCI P3 VA-panels started getting produced for consumer, the smearing has been going away in more and more implementations. These panels are also known for being pretty bad at sRGB, you really want to stay with DCI P3.
When a company advertises mini LED, they're advertising a "Full Array Local Dimming" feature, which is not something we've had since forever. FALD is a relatively new development in LCD panels. LEDs are arranged in a dense grid with up to thousands of individual LEDs, usually grouped 2x2 to a "backlighting zone." These zones can be turned off individually, producing true-ish blacks in those turned-off areas of the display. The downside is that the contrast within illuminated zones are still limited to the panel's native contrast. And light diffusion across the panel is a thing too. The end result is that you get light halos around bright objects. VA tends to handle this better than IPS, though.

This is a feature that was found in only a handful of special, very expensive panels per year for the last few years, and not at all before then. 2022 is going to see a lot more of them. HDR is the new GTG response times for monitor manufacturers, and every LCD display company is jumping aboard the FALD train for their flagship products. 2023 will probably see the tech trickle down to regular high-end displays, and then it'll be everywhere.
Posted on Reply
#13
bug
kongaWhen a company advertises mini LED, they're advertising a "Full Array Local Dimming" feature, which is not something we've had since forever. FALD is a relatively new development in LCD panels. LEDs are arranged in a dense grid with up to thousands of individual LEDs, usually grouped 2x2 to a "backlighting zone." These zones can be turned off individually, producing true-ish blacks in those turned-off areas of the display. The downside is that the contrast within illuminated zones are still limited to the panel's native contrast. And light diffusion across the panel is a thing too. The end result is that you get light halos around bright objects. VA tends to handle this better than IPS, though.

This is a feature that was found in only a handful of special, very expensive panels per year for the last few years, and not at all before then. 2022 is going to see a lot more of them. HDR is the new GTG response times for monitor manufacturers, and every LCD display company is jumping aboard the FALD train for their flagship products. 2023 will probably see the tech trickle down to regular high-end displays, and then it'll be everywhere.
Well yes, but even when LCDs were/are backlit, chance are LEDs are used to produce the light. In that sense, we've had LED backlights for years.
FALD (and friends) are just a new way of arranging those LEDs. Of course, when you try to teach that to do HDR and VRR, you get a very, very different beast.
Posted on Reply
#14
konga
bugWell yes, but even when LCDs were/are backlit, chance are LEDs are used to produce the light. In that sense, we've had LED backlights for years.
FALD (and friends) are just a new way of arranging those LEDs. Of course, when you try to teach that to do HDR and VRR, you get a very, very different beast.
Of course. But there was some confusion that needed to be cleared up, since what companies are calling "mini LED" backlights right now work differently from the LED backlights LCD monitors have been using for ages. Instead of having a few dozen LEDs backlighting the display, they have been miniaturized to the point where thousands can fit into a screen. The 16" M1 Macbook Pro for instance has 10,000 LEDs in its 16" screen—pretty different from how things were with older LCD panels! It's a distinction worth making, in my opinion. It's not just an old tech with a new marketing name since it does something meaningful.
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