Thursday, January 6th 2022

Alienware Demos 34-inch QD-OLED Monitor at CES

Although Samsung apparently wasn't ready to show off its rumoured 34-inch QD-OLED monitor at CES, Alienware stepped up and demonstrated a fully working model that is said to be launching as soon as the 29th of March in the US market. The Alienware 34 Curved QD-LED Gaming Monitor or the AW3423DW as it's also known as, uses a curved QD-OLED panel from Samsung, with QD standing for Quantum Dot, a technology used to boost colours in various types of display panels.

The Alienware 34 Curved QD-LED Gaming Monitor offers a resolution of 3440x1440, which gives it an aspect ratio of 21:9. It's said to feature Nvidia's G-Sync Ultimate, with refresh rates of up to 175 Hz over DP and 100 Hz over HDMI. It has a typical brightness of only 250 cd/m², but as this is an HDR capable display, this can go as high as 1000 cd/m² in HDR mode. The monitor sports one DisplayPort 1.4, two HDMI 2.0 ports and three USB 3.2 ports at 5 Gbps, as well as a 3.5 mm headphone jack and a line-out jack. No word on pricing as yet, but it would be silly to presume this will be a cheap monitor.
Source: Dell
Add your own comment

67 Comments on Alienware Demos 34-inch QD-OLED Monitor at CES

#1
Crackong
Cool
Now make it flat, 4k and 32 inch 120Hz, then take my money
Posted on Reply
#2
destruya
Why is HDMI 2.1 so goddamned hard to add to displays? When you're paying for a premium display like this, why *wouldn't* you put 2.1 ports on it?
Posted on Reply
#3
TheLostSwede
destruyaWhy is HDMI 2.1 so goddamned hard to add to displays? When you're paying for a premium display like this, why *wouldn't* you put 2.1 ports on it?
It's apparently an Nvidia G-Sync module limitation.
Posted on Reply
#4
Vladiczech
I'm waiting for new 34" OLED monitor for too long already, but based on specs I will skip this one.
Only HDR 400, curvature 1800R is too high, typical brightness 250cd/m2 is too low.

I keep my fingers crossed for true next gen OLED 34" or 38" monitor, 1000R curvature, at least 400cd/m2 typical brightness and G-SYNC Ultimate and then take my money :)
Posted on Reply
#5
TheLostSwede
VladiczechI'm waiting for new 34" OLED monitor for too long already, but based on specs I will skip this one.
Only HDR 400, curvature 1800R is too high, typical brightness 250cd/m2 is too low.

I keep my fingers crossed for true next gen OLED 34" or 38" monitor, 1000R curvature, at least 400cd/m2 typical brightness and G-SYNC Ultimate and then take my money :)
HDR 400 True Black isn't the same as HDR 400 though. Also, it clearly can do a lot higher peak brightness. Lots of other reasons why to skip this one though.
displayhdr.org/#tab-true-black-400
Posted on Reply
#6
Vayra86
Somehow this stinks.

Vesa 400 True Black... 1000cd/m2 peak... 250cd/m2 static.

I'm not sure what trickery is deployed here, but I'm skeptical.
TheLostSwedeHDR 400 True Black isn't the same as HDR 400 though. Also, it clearly can do a lot higher peak brightness. Lots of other reasons why to skip this one though.
displayhdr.org/#tab-true-black-400
That's the thing. Why doesn't it conform to a much better HDR 'standard' (as laughable as those VESA ratings are) then? The 1000cd/m2 peak is pure marketing, it has no quantifiable use apparently for VESA. It can't conform to 'True Black' when producing higher peak brightness than 400cd/m2, could be another conclusion... which echoes my thoughts on how these QD-OLED panels work under the hood and why the contrast also isn't infinite like a true OLED.
Posted on Reply
#7
lZKoce
Looks smexy alright, but I am after something like Samsung G9 Odyssey....49" to replace having a dual monitor setup.
Posted on Reply
#8
Totally
Vayra86Somehow this stinks.

Vesa 400 True Black... 1000cd/m2 peak... 250cd/m2 static.

I'm not sure what trickery is deployed here, but I'm skeptical.



That's the thing. Why doesn't it conform to a much better HDR 'standard' (as laughable as those VESA ratings are) then? The 1000cd/m2 peak is pure marketing, it has no quantifiable use apparently for VESA. It can't conform to 'True Black' when producing higher peak brightness than 400cd/m2, could be another conclusion... which echoes my thoughts on how these QD-OLED panels work under the hood and why the contrast also isn't infinite like a true OLED.
However you understand LED screens throw that out when it comes to these new screens. Reading through this thread a lot people of should learn a bit about it before mouthing off.

The screen used in the comparison had a higher rated brightness.

Posted on Reply
#9
Vayra86
TotallyHowever you understand LED screens throw that out when it comes to these new screens. Reading through this thread a lot people of should learn a bit about it before mouthing off.

The screen used in the comparison had a higher rated brightness.

"Sponsored By Samsung"

Seeing is believing ;) I'll wait for something that looks like a real review and with actual measurements.

Linus just lost a few more points.
Posted on Reply
#10
Chrispy_
We're slowly getting closer to the ideal monitor:
  • Genuine <1ms pixel response in all scenarios
  • Black frame insertion/strobing image that isn't dim so that you get vivid clear focus on moving objects without sample-and-hold blur
  • Black levels are actually black
  • No backlight bleed or off-angle gamma/colour/contrast shifts
  • Usable HDR
  • VRR
It's a shame that we're not quite there yet and even this imperfect Alienware monitor is probably going to cost 5-10x more than a decent IPS/VA gaming monitor. I'm going to guess $2500.
Posted on Reply
#11
TheLostSwede
Vayra86Somehow this stinks.

Vesa 400 True Black... 1000cd/m2 peak... 250cd/m2 static.

I'm not sure what trickery is deployed here, but I'm skeptical.



That's the thing. Why doesn't it conform to a much better HDR 'standard' (as laughable as those VESA ratings are) then? The 1000cd/m2 peak is pure marketing, it has no quantifiable use apparently for VESA. It can't conform to 'True Black' when producing higher peak brightness than 400cd/m2, could be another conclusion... which echoes my thoughts on how these QD-OLED panels work under the hood and why the contrast also isn't infinite like a true OLED.
Sorry, I don't work at Dell or Samsung, so I can't really tell you, as I know as much about this as you.
Posted on Reply
#12
Asni
Still talking about curved displays in 2022. Cannot believe that.
Posted on Reply
#13
lynx29
even if this is a great monitor, having that Alienware tax will make it not worth it. plus I don't trust Alienware/Dell for long term updates.

LG however has already proven themselves as the OLED leader, and they listen to the community and provide frequent OTA updates. I will be doing LG C2 42" OLED. and it will prob be half the price of this and have a better gaming experience/picture to boot.
Posted on Reply
#14
Vayra86
AsniStill talking about curved displays in 2022. Cannot believe that.
Curved has a place, only a single one, I reckon, and that's 21:9 in a desktop setting at a larger diagonal (>30 inch).

I can genuinely say its an advantage there. I've also sat in front of larger curved TV's but that was utter crap.
Posted on Reply
#15
TheLostSwede
lynx29even if this is a great monitor, having that Alienware tax will make it not worth it. plus I don't trust Alienware/Dell for long term updates.

LG however has already proven themselves as the OLED leader, and they listen to the community and provide frequent OTA updates. I will be doing LG C2 42" OLED. and it will prob be half the price of this and have a better gaming experience/picture to boot.
Dell makes very good displays, so nothing to worry about there. Also, this is a display, it doesn't need OTA updates...
Posted on Reply
#16
Asni
Vayra86Curved has a place, only a single one, I reckon, and that's 21:9 in a desktop setting at a larger diagonal (>30 inch).

I can genuinely say its an advantage there. I've also sat in front of larger curved TV's but that was utter crap.
Anything affecting geometry of images shouldn't exist, 21:9, 32:9 or 4:3.
But i guess milking gamers is the easieast thing to do.
Posted on Reply
#17
Vayra86
AsniAnything affecting geometry of images shouldn't exist, 21:9, 32:9 or 4:3.
But i guess milking gamers is the easieast thing to do.
4:3 and a curve, now that would be something else :D

Thing is, for gaming you don't need perfect geometry to make it work, you need immersion, and ever since we've been placing monitors side-by-side to get more of that, we've had bezels in the way. But even then, people would set it up like this:



So I'm not so sure you've given your stance sufficient thought ;) This isn't new and it even works for productivity. Note how the guy's in some office doing office things.
Posted on Reply
#18
TheLostSwede
Vayra86Note how the guy's in some office doing office things.
With a mouse. No keyboard, just a mouse. That is assuming there is a mouse in his hand...
Posted on Reply
#19
dyonoctis
Vayra86"Sponsored By Samsung"

Seeing is believing ;) I'll wait for something that looks like a real review and with actual measurements.

Linus just lost a few more points.
To be fair, Samsung literally paid them the trip to see the tech:D, and they did say that the whole environment was controlled by Samsung. They will receive the Alienware screen, so we'll see
Posted on Reply
#20
TheLostSwede
dyonoctisTo be fair, Samsung literally paid them the trip to see the tech:D, and they did say that the whole environment was controlled by Samsung. They will receive the Alienware screen, so we'll see
Linus charges US$10-20k for every video they make, so please don't trust any content from there.
Posted on Reply
#21
Vayra86
TheLostSwedeWith a mouse. No keyboard, just a mouse. That is assuming there is a mouse in his hand...
Working from home is a whole new concept. You have no colleagues to chat with so idle time is masked by looking at your teams feed all day :D
dyonoctisTo be fair, Samsung literally paid them the trip to see the tech:D, and they did say that the whole environment was controlled by Samsung. They will receive the Alienware screen, so we'll see
That was my point. So using it as an argument to say 'you dont know what you speak of' is pretty short sighted.
Posted on Reply
#22
Chrispy_
Vayra86Curved has a place, only a single one, I reckon, and that's 21:9 in a desktop setting at a larger diagonal (>30 inch).

I can genuinely say its an advantage there. I've also sat in front of larger curved TV's but that was utter crap.
Agreed. People forget that flat images suffer projection distortion and a curved image is actually less "wrong"

I prefer 32" and above to be curved displays. Even if you don't care about the curve it has a positive effect on viewing angles, leading to better colour and contrast uniformity on VA, as well as mitigating corner glow and fade out at the far edges on IPS displays.
Posted on Reply
#23
Nordiga
VladiczechI'm waiting for new 34" OLED monitor for too long already, but based on specs I will skip this one.
Only HDR 400, curvature 1800R is too high, typical brightness 250cd/m2 is too low.

I keep my fingers crossed for true next gen OLED 34" or 38" monitor, 1000R curvature, at least 400cd/m2 typical brightness and G-SYNC Ultimate and then take my money :)
You got the curvature numbers wrong, 1800R is a less aggressive curve than 1000R, an extreme curve like the Samsung Odyssey series use. As i like small curvatures, 1800R is the perfect curvature for me.
Posted on Reply
#24
bonehead123
Alienware....before the buyout, was always on my top 5 buy list...

Afterwards.... No... just N.O....
Posted on Reply
#25
lynx29
TheLostSwedeDell makes very good displays, so nothing to worry about there. Also, this is a display, it doesn't need OTA updates...
you would surprised, if you look at the patch notes for LG C1 OLED last year... they improved so many things over time after listening to community feedback, reviewers, etc. HDR improved, dithering, etc.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment