News Posts matching "3DMark"

Return to Keyword Browsing

Futuremark Releases 3DMark v2.3.3682

Futuremark today released an update to 3DMark benchmark suite. Version 2.3.3682 resolves a critical bug in the API overhead test, which causes the test to fail on some machines, towards the end of the DirectX 12 API test. The API overhead benchmark tests the amount of API draw-calls your machine can handle, over popular 3D graphics APIs, including DirectX 11 (single-threaded and multi-threaded), DirectX 12, and Vulkan. The rest of the feature-set is consistent with the older version 2.3.3663, in which the company introduced a brand new Vulkan API overhead test, replacing the Mantle API test. Grab the update from the link below.
DOWNLOAD: Futuremark 3DMark + Time Spy v2.3.3682

AMD's RX 580, 570 and RX 550 Specifications and 3D Mark Results Leak

So, it would appear that rumors and leaks about the RX 500 series being simple rebrands of AMD's RX 400 line were true. Recent leaks point to no more changes and performance increases than those achieved through higher base clock speeds on the graphics cards' GPU and memory. The architecture is the same, and the process seems to have followed the same path - as of yet, no confirmation regarding whether or not these cards do use a newer, leaner LPP process for higher clocks and less power consumption.

Futuremark Ends Support for 3DMark Vantage and PCMark Vantage

Futuremark today announced that it is pulling the plug on its decade-old benchmark suites, 3DMark Vantage and PCMark Vantage. Official support for the two products will end on the 11th of April, 2017. This would entail the two being removed from the Downloads section of Futuremark, a stoppage in software updates, and the all-important benchmark result validation service. The two will be relegated to the "legacy benchmarks" section, and will be available as free downloads. Incidentally, April 11 also happens to be the day Microsoft stops support for Windows Vista.

Futuremark Releases 3DMark v2.3.3663 - Adds Vulkan Support

Futuremark has just released a major update to its 3DMark benchmarking suite, adding Vulkan support while simultaneously axing its cousin, Mantle. This means that the API Overhead test now uses a Vulkan path instead of its previous Mantle one, which is sure to lead several enthusiasts into a frenzy of benchmarking under the Khronos's API (which has just recently been announced will offer support for multi-GPU in Windows 10, 8.x, 7, and Linux operating systems.)

Check some of the new features, improvements and fixes on the new version right after the break. You can download this piece of software right here on TPU - just follow the link below.
Download: Futuremark 3DMark + TimeSpy v2.3.3663

GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Overclocked Beyond 2 GHz Put Through 3DMark

An NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti reference-design graphics card was overclocked to 2062 MHz core, and 11404 MHz (GDDR5X-effective) memory, and put through the 3DMark suite. The card was able to sustain its overclock without breaking a sweat, with its core temperature hovering around 63°C. Apparently, the card's power-limit was manually set to 122%, to sustain the overclock. In the standard FireStrike benchmark (1080p), the card churned up graphics scores of 31,135 points, followed by 15,093 points in FireStrike Extreme (1440p), and 7,362 points in the 4K Ultra HD version of the benchmark, FireStrike Ultra. The card also scored 10,825 points in the TimeSpy DirectX 12 benchmark. Overall, the card falls within 30-40% performance of an overclocked GTX 1080.
Sources: ChipHell, VideoCardz

AMD's Ryzen 7 1700X Glorious Benchmarks Leak; IHS, Pin Layout Photographed

Another day, another leak: the folks at XFastest have indeed been the fastest to leak images of an actual Ryzen 7 1700X processor, with pictures of the processor's IHS and pin area running rampant throughout the Internet (the Ryzen chip is located to the right in both pictures, with a sample of AMD's previous-generation FX CPUs on the left side for comparison sake).

While revealing shots may have their appeal, it's the benchmarking portion that most of us are expectant about. Until actual reviews are out, we're left nothing more than these leaks (which should be taken with appropriate amounts of salt). In this case, benchmarks of AMD's upcoming Ryzen 7 1700X have been released, showing just how the upcoming CPU delivers in 3D Mark Fire Strike, CPU Mark and Cinebench R15.

AMD Ryzen 1700X, 1600X & 1300 Benchmarks Leaked

A number of sites have been reporting on some leaked (as in, captured from Futuremark's database) scores on AMD's upcoming CPUs. Now, some benchmarks seem to have surfaced regarding not only the company's 8-core, 16-thread monsters, but also towards its sweet-spot 6-core, 12-thread CPUs and its more mundane 4-core offerings.

Taking into account some metrics (which you should, naturally, take with some grains of salt), and comparing Intel's and AMD's Ryzen offerings on 3DMark's Fire Strike Physics scores, we can see that a $389 Ryzen 7 1700X (8 cores, 16 threads) at its base clock of 3.4 GHz manages to surpass Intel's competing (in thread count alone, since it retails for $1089) 6900K running at its base 3.2 GHz frequency - with the Ryzen processor scoring 17,878 points versus the 6900K's 17,100. Doing some fast and hard maths, this would mean that if the R7 1700X was to be clocked at the same speed as the 6900K, it would still be faster, clock for clock (though not by much, admittedly). We don't know whether Turbo was disabled or not on these tests, for either AMD's or Intel's processor, so we have to consider that. However, if Turbo were enabled, that would mean that the R7 1700X's clockspeed would only be 100 MHz higher than the 6900K's (3.8 GHz max, vs 3.7 GHz max on the Intel CPU).

ASUS Intros the GeForce GTX 1070 Expedition Graphics Card

ASUS announced the GeForce GTX 1070 Expedition series graphics card. Based on the company's new Expedition line of durable graphics cards, which made its debut this CES, with the GTX 1050 Ti Expedition, this card is designed with a focus on durability and longevity. Each card on the production line has been stress-tested against the elements for longer than the other cards. This includes 144 hours of continuous stress, 2-hour reboot test (continuous reboots), and 15 hours of 3DMark stress. The idea here is to make the cards fit for the rigors of gaming iCafes, which are popular in some parts of Asia.

The GTX 1070 Expedition comes with a factory OC of 1607 MHz core, 1797 MHz GPU Boost, and an untouched 8.00 GHz (GDDR5-effective) memory, against reference clocks of 1506/1683 MHz. It features a dense aluminium fin-stack heatsink with a single fin array to which heat drawn directly from the GPU is conveyed by a pair of 8 mm-thick nickel-plated copper heat pipes. The card draws power from a single 8-pin PCIe power connector. Display outputs include three DisplayPorts, and one each of HDMI and DVI. The company didn't reveal pricing or availability information, although it's likely that this card could see a release limited to certain east Asian markets.

Source: VideoCardz

Futuremark Readies New Vulkan and DirectX 12 Benchmarks

Futuremark is working on new game-tests for its 3DMark benchmark suite. One of these is a game test that takes advantage of DirectX 12, but isn't as taxing on the hardware as "Time Spy." Its target hardware is notebook graphics and entry-mainstream graphics cards. It will be to "Time Spy" what "Sky Diver" is to "Fire Strike."

The next, more interesting move by Futuremark is a benchmark that takes advantage of the Vulkan 3D graphics API. The company will release this Vulkan-based benchmark for both Windows and Android platforms. Lastly we've learned that development of the company's VR benchmarks are coming along nicely, and the company hopes to release new VR benchmarks for PC and mobile platforms soon. Futuremark is expected to reveal these new game-tests and benchmarks at its 2017 International CES booth, early January.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti Mobile Detailed

Thanks to gains with performance/Watt, NVIDIA has been equipping the mobile variants of its GeForce GTX 10 Series SKUs with the same (or better) core-configurations as their desktop counterparts. The story continues with the upcoming GeForce GTX 1050 Ti Mobile. This chip is equipped with 768 CUDA cores, 48 TMUs, 32 ROPs, and 4 GB of GDDR5 memory across its 128-bit wide memory interface. What's more, it even has significantly higher clock speeds than its desktop counterpart. The GTX 1050 Ti Mobile is clocked at 1490 MHz core, 1624 MHz GPU Boost; while the desktop variant is clocked at 1290 MHz core with 1392 MHz GPU Boost.

With its given clock speeds, the GeForce GTX 1050 Ti Mobile is expected to be faster than the performance-segment GeForce GTX 970M from the previous generation. 3DMark performance numbers put out by LaptopMedia point to the GTX 1050 Ti Mobile being about 10% faster than the GTX 970M at 3DMark Cloudgate (DirectX 10), about 7% faster at 3DMark FireStrike (DirectX 11), and about 9% faster at Unigine Heaven 4 (DirectX 11).Source: LaptopMedia

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti 3DMark Performance Revealed

Ahead of its launch, a PC enthusiast with access to a GeForce GTX 1050 Ti sample in its retail packaging, managed to get the card up and running with the included DVD drivers. On a machine driven by a fairly powerful Core i7-4770K, the GTX 1050 Ti was put through 3DMark Fire Strike Ultra (DirectX 11) and 3DMark Time Spy (DirectX 12).

The GTX 1050 Ti scored 1,895 points in 3DMark Fire Strike Ultra, with a graphics score of 1,853 points. The card scored 2,513 points in 3DMark Time Spy, with a graphics score of 2,370 points. The two scores indicate performance higher than the Radeon RX 460, according to VideoCardz. The GTX 1050 (non-Ti) could perform closer to the RX 460. The latest GPU-Z screenshot confirms many of the GPU's rumored specifications.
Sources: VideoCardz, WCCFTech

ASUS Announces the Radeon RX 460 STRIX

ASUS Republic of Gamers (ROG) today announced Strix RX 460, an all-new gaming graphics card with ultra-fast performance, advanced cooling and reliability, and personalized styling. Powered by the latest AMD Radeon RX 460 graphics processing unit (GPU), clocked at 1256MHz in OC mode, ROG Strix RX 460 delivers up to 8.2%-faster performance than reference cards in 3DMark Fire Strike Extreme and 38.6%-faster gaming performance in Hitman.

ROG Strix RX 460 is packed with exclusive ASUS technologies, including DirectCU II with a patented dual wing-blade 0dB fan designed to deliver maximum airflow for 30%-cooler and three-times (3X) quieter performance, and ASUS FanConnect, which features a GPU-controlled fan header to connect to a system fan for targeted supplemental cooling. Industry-exclusive Auto-Extreme technology with Super Alloy Power II components ensures premium quality and reliability.

EVGA Hardware Breaks 3DMark "Time Spy" World Records

EVGA and extreme overclocker Vince "K|NGP|N" Lucido have done it again, this time in the new DirectX 12 benchmark from Futuremark: "3DMark Time Spy". This new benchmark pushes the limits of modern PC gaming technology and can be used as a gauge for future game performance and visuals.

Armed with Liquid Nitrogen, an EVGA X99 FTW K motherboard, and an EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Classified overclocked to 2,594MHz, K|NGP|N was able to hit new performance heights. He was able to score 9,973 points, a new single card World Record. The new EVGA Precision XOC software was used to overclock the graphics card, and is one of the only tools that can display a DirectX 12 OSD, a must have feature for overclockers.

Futuremark Releases 3DMark Time Spy DirectX 12 Benchmark

Futuremark released the latest addition to the 3DMark benchmark suite, the new "Time Spy" benchmark and stress-test. All existing 3DMark Basic and Advanced users have limited access to "Time Spy," existing 3DMark Advanced users have the option of unlocking the full feature-set of "Time Spy" with an upgrade key that's priced at US $9.99. The price of 3DMark Advanced for new users has been revised from its existing $24.99 to $29.99, as new 3DMark Advanced purchases include the fully-unlocked "Time Spy." Futuremark announced limited-period offers that last up till 23rd July, in which the "Time Spy" upgrade key for existing 3DMark Advanced users can be had for $4.99, and the 3DMark Advanced Edition (minus "Time Spy") for $9.99.

Futuremark 3DMark "Time Spy" has been developed with inputs from AMD, NVIDIA, Intel, and Microsoft, and takes advantage of the new DirectX 12 API. For this reason, the test requires Windows 10. The test almost exponentially increases the 3D processing load over "Fire Strike," by leveraging the low-overhead API features of DirectX 12, to present a graphically intense 3D test-scene that can make any gaming/enthusiast PC of today break a sweat. It can also make use of several beyond-4K display resolutions.

DOWNLOAD: 3DMark with TimeSpy v2.1.2852

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 3DMark Firestrike Performance Revealed

A Chinese PC bulletin board member with access to a GeForce GTX 1060 sample, put it through 3DMark Firestrike (standard) and 3DMark Firestrike Ultra. The card was tested on a machine powered by a Core i7-6700K processor. The screenshots, particularly the GPU-Z screenshot, reveals something fascinating. It looks like the rumors of NVIDIA launching two distinct SKUs of the GTX 1060 could be true. The driver is reporting the GPU name as "GeForce GTX 1060 6GB." Mentioning memory amount in the name string is unusual for NVIDIA, in this case, it could point to the possibility of a 6 GB SKU, and another with 3 GB memory.

Moving on to the business end of the story, the card's 3DMark Firestrike scores are 11,225 points for the standard test, and 3,014 points for Firestrike Ultra. This isn't significantly faster than the Radeon RX 480 8 GB. Here are some 3DMark Firestrike numbers for the RX 480. NVIDIA is expected to launch the GeForce GTX 1060 later this month.

Source: XFastest

Futuremark Teases 3DMark "Time Spy" DirectX 12 Benchmark

Futuremark teased its first benchmark for DirectX 12 graphics, the 3DMark "Time Spy." Likely marketed as an add-on to the 3DMark (2013) suite, "Time Spy" tests DirectX 12 features in a silicon-scorching 3D scene that's rich in geometric, textural, and visual detail. The benchmark is also ready for new generation displays including high resolutions beyond 4K Ultra HD. Existing users of 3DMark get "Basic" access to "Time Spy" when it comes out, with the option to purchase its "Advanced" and "Professional" modes.

Under the hood, "Time Spy" takes advantage of Direct3D feature-level 12_0, including Asynchronous Compute, heavily multi-threaded CPUs (which can make use of as many CPU cores as you can throw at it), and DirectX explicit multi-adapter (native multi-GPU, including mixed setups). Futuremark stated that the benchmark was developed with inputs from AMD, Intel, NVIDIA, Microsoft, and other partners of the Futuremark Benchmark Development Program.
A teaser trailer video follows.

Futuremark Releases 3DMark Stress Tests

Futuremark released a new stress-test mode for the popular 3DMark suite, which lets you test the stability of your machine, after all the overclock/volt wizardry is done. What this mode does is runs a continuous 3D scene from the bench of your choice ("Fire Strike" (standard, Extreme, and Ultra,) and "Skydiver"), in a continuous rendering, without stopping for any loading screens or other breaks. This is different from the "loop" custom test setting, which runs each test over and over again, with pauses to reload the scene.

In the free edition, you can stress for up to 10 minutes. The Professional Edition key lets you scorch your hardware for up to 40 hours. Stressing your hardware is not all that this mode does, there's also a stability-test component, which checks for frame-rate stability through the defined cycles of your stress. The app would flag your hardware as "passed" only if it can achieve a frame-rate stability of at least 97% (it should tell you if your overclock is not sustainable as it runs into a thermal throttle). Simply update your 3DMark installation to the latest version, to use this feature.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 Faster than GTX TITAN X

NVIDIA's upcoming GeForce GTX 1070 graphics card, which NVIDIA is pinning its summer upgrade revenue on, is shaping up to be faster than the previous-generation enthusiast GeForce GTX TITAN X. 3DMark FireStrike numbers scored by VideoCardz reveal that averaged across three popular resolutions - 1080p (FireStrike standard), 1440p (FireStrike Advanced), and 4K (FireStrike Ultra), the GTX 1070 is about 3 percent faster than the GTX TITAN X.

At FireStrike (standard), the GTX 1070 scored 17557 points, versus 17396 points of the GTX TITAN X; 8327 points at FireStrike Advanced against 7989; and 4078 points at FireStrike Ultra against 3862, respectively. The performance lead is highest at 4K Ultra HD. Based on the 16 nm GP104 silicon, the GeForce GTX 1070 features 1,920 CUDA cores, 120 TMUs, and 8 GB of GDDR5 memory clocked at 8.00 GHz (256 GB/s). The MSRP for this SKU is set at $379, although its reference design board will be sold at a $70 premium, for $449, when the card goes on sale this 10th June.

Source: VideoCardz

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Put Through 3DMark

Some of the first 3DMark performance numbers of NVIDIA's upcoming GeForce GTX 1080 graphics card made it to Futuremark's online database. The results page hint at samples of the GTX 1080 running on early drivers, on two separate machines (likely from two different sources). The first source, who ran the card on a machine with a Core i7-5820K processor, scored P19005 on 3DMark 11 (performance preset). The second source, who ran the card on a machine with a Core i7-3770K processor, scored 8959 points on 3DMark FireStrike Extreme. Both scores point at GTX 1080 being faster than a GTX 980 Ti.

Source: VideoCardz

AMD Radeon Pro Duo up to 51 Percent Faster than GeForce GTX TITAN Z

The new AMD Radeon Pro Duo, announced earlier today, takes the crown for being the world's fastest graphics card. According to the company's internal testing, in which it compared the card to its previous-generation flagship Radeon R9 295X2, and NVIDIA's fastest card, the GeForce GTX TITAN Z, on 3DMark FireStrike, at resolutions of 1080p, 1440p, and 2160p; the Pro Duo was found to be as much as 51 percent faster than the GTX TITAN Z. The three cards were tested on a machine with a Core i7-5960X processor, 16 GB of quad-channel DDR4 memory, Windows 10, v15.301 driver for the AMD cards, and GeForce 361.91 drivers for the NVIDIA card.

At 1080p, the Radeon Pro Duo scores 20150 points, compared to 16717 points of the R9 295X2, and 14945 points of the GTX TITAN Z, the Radeon Pro Duo leads the GTX TITAN Z by 34.8 percent in this resolution. At 1440p, the Radeon Pro Duo scores 11466 points, compared to 9250 points for the R9 295X2, and 7740 points of the GTX TITAN Z; the Pro Duo leads the GTX TITAN Z by 48.13 percent. Finally, at the resolution which really matters for this product, 4K Ultra HD, the Radeon Pro Duo scores 6211 points, compared to the 5121 points of the R9 295X2, and 4099 points of the GTX TITAN Z.

3DMark "Time Spy" Benchmark 5 Times Heavier on your GPU than "Fire Strike"

At a media event held in China, graphics card maker GALAX revealed Futuremark's next big 3D graphics benchmark. The unnamed next-gen 3DMark suite will include DirectX 12 game tests, including one titled "Time Spy." This game test (GT) features a museum-like 3D scene, rich in eye-popping lighting effects, and GT scenes from previous-generation 3DMarks serving as miniature exhibits within the test.

From the looks of it, your DirectX 12 compatible GPU is in for a trial by fire, in what promises to be an exciting next-gen 3D benchmark. The benchmark renders at 1080p, 1440p, or 4K, and is said to be "5 times" heavier on your GPU than "Fire Strike," Futuremark's DirectX 11 test that featured in the 2013 release of the suite. What's more, the benchmark will explicitly require Windows 10 64-bit, since it requires Direct3D 12 API support, and needs >2 GB of memory. Futuremark mentioned an "early" Q1-2016 launch for this benchmark.

A video presentation follows.

EVGA and K|NGP|N Take GeForce GTX 980 Ti GPU to New Heights – 2200MHz

EVGA and Vince "K|NGP|N" Lucido have once again teamed up to achieve three new 3DMark World Records, with Vince running his EVGA GeForce GTX 980 Ti K|NGP|N Edition graphics card at over 2200MHz GPU clock on liquid nitrogen cooling. The EVGA GeForce GTX 980 Ti K|NGP|N Edition graphics card has been meticulously designed from the ground up for overclocking, and feats such these new world records are further proof that EVGA products are #1 for overclocking. Vince recently had this to say about the graphics card design:

"K|NGP|N GTX 980 Ti once again represents EVGA's dedication to the enthusiast inspired hardware, bullet proof engineering and bleeding edge performance."

Radeon Fury X Outperforms GeForce GTX Titan X, Fury to GTX 980 Ti: 3DMark Bench

AMD's upcoming $650 Radeon R9 Fury X could have what it takes to beat NVIDIA's $999 GeForce GTX Titan X, while the $550 Radeon Fury (non-X) performs close to the $650 GeForce GTX 980 Ti, according to leaked 3DMark 11 and 3DMark (2013) benches by Korean tech publication ITCM.co.kr. The benches see the R9 Fury X score higher than the GTX Titan X in all three tests, while the R9 Fury is almost as fast as the GTX 980 Ti. The cards maintain their winning streak over NVIDIA even with memory-intensive tests such as 3DMark Fire Strike Ultra (4K), but buckle with 5K. These two cards, which are bound for the market within the next 30 days, were tested alongside the R9 390X, which is not too far behind the GTX 980, in the same graphs. The R9 Nano, however, isn't circulated among industry partners, yet. It could still launch in Summer 2015.
Source: ITCM (Korea)

Futuremark Releases 3DMark Update with API Overhead Feature-set

Futuremark is excited to introduce our new 3DMark API Overhead feature test - the world's first independent test for measuring differences in DirectX 12, DirectX 11 and Mantle API performance. It's also the very first public application to use DirectX 12 full stop. This is cutting edge stuff! Developed with input from AMD, Intel, Microsoft, NVIDIA, and the other members of our Benchmark Development Program, the 3DMark API Overhead feature test lets you compare the performance of DirectX 12, DirectX 11, and Mantle.

The purpose of the test is to compare the relative performance of different APIs on a single system, rather than the absolute performance of different systems. The API Overhead feature test is not a general-purpose GPU benchmark, and it should not be used to compare graphics cards from different vendors. (We are working on a DirectX 12 benchmark with game-like workloads, which we expect to release soon after the public launch of Windows 10.)

DOWNLOAD: Futuremark 3DMark v1.5.884

GeForce GTX 960 3DMark Numbers Emerge

Ahead of its January 22nd launch, Chinese PC community PCEVA members leaked performance figures of NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 960. The card was installed on a test-bed driven by a Core i7-4770K overclocked to 4.50 GHz. The card itself appears to be factory-overclocked, if these specs are to believed. The card scored P9960 and X3321 in the performance and extreme presets of 3DMark 11, respectively. On standard 3DMark FireStrike, the card scored 6636 points. With some manual overclocking thrown in, it managed to score 7509 points in the same test. 3DMark Extreme (1440p) was harsh on this card, it scored 3438 points. 3DMark Ultra was too much for the card to chew, and it could only manage 1087 points. Looking at these numbers, the GTX 960 could be an interesting offering for Full HD (1920 x 1080) gaming, not a pixel more.

Source: PCEVA Forums
Return to Keyword Browsing