News Posts matching "GM200"

Return to Keyword Browsing

NVIDIA Reportedly Stops Production of Certain "Maxwell" GPUs

Paving the way for its next-generation "Pascal" architecture-based performance-thru-enthusiast GPUs, NVIDIA reportedly halted further production of certain current-generation "Maxwell" GPUs. HWBattle reports that production of the GM204-based GeForce GTX 980, the popular GTX 970, and GM200-based GTX 980 Ti have seen production halts, to let the market digest existing inventories of the three cards; and letting NVIDIA's add-in card (AIC) partners prepare to stock up next-generation graphics cards, beginning with at least three SKUs based on the GP104 silicon, in June 2016.


Source: HWBattle

NVIDIA to Unveil "Pascal" at the 2016 Computex

NVIDIA is reportedly planning to unveil its next-generation GeForce GTX "Pascal" GPUs at the 2016 Computex show, in Taipei, scheduled for early-June. This unveiling doesn't necessarily mean market availability. SweClockers reports that problems, particularly related to NVIDIA supplier TSMC getting its 16 nm FinFET node up to speed, especially following the recent Taiwan earthquake, could delay market available to late- or even post-Summer. It remains to be seen if the "Pascal" architecture debuts as an all-mighty "GP100" chip, or a smaller, performance-segment "GP104" that will be peddled as enthusiast-segment over being faster than the current big-chip, the GM200. NVIDIA's next generation GeForce nomenclature will also be particularly interesting to look out for, given that the current lineup is already at the GTX 900 series.

Source: SweClockers

NVIDIA GP100 Silicon to Feature 4 TFLOPs DPFP Performance

NVIDIA's upcoming flagship GPU based on its next-generation "Pascal" architecture, codenamed GP100, is shaping up to be a number-crunching monster. According to a leaked slide by an NVIDIA research fellow, the company is designing the chip to serve up double-precision floating-point (DPFP) performance as high as 4 TFLOP/s, a 3-fold increase from the 1.31 TFLOP/s offered by the Tesla K20, based on the "Kepler" GK110 silicon.

The same slide also reveals single-precision floating-point (SPFP) performance to be as high as 12 TFLOP/s, four times that of the GK110, and nearly double that of the GM200. The slide also appears to settle the speculation on whether GP100 will use stacked HBM2 memory, or GDDR5X. Given the 1 TB/s memory bandwidth mentioned on the slide, we're inclined to hand it to stacked HBM2.

Source: 3DCenter.org

AMD Prepares December Launch of Dual-GPU "Fiji" Graphics Card

AMD could launch its next-generation dual-GPU graphics card based on the "Fiji" silicon, some time in December. Codenamed "Fury-Gemini," the card features a pair of "Fiji" GPUs in an internal multi-GPU setup; and is cooled by an AIO liquid-cooling solution, much like the R9 Fury X. Prototype boards of this card were shown by AMD top-brass at some of the chip's earliest reveals. It's expected that the PCB (pictured below), will be mated with a liquid-cooling solution; and unless NVIDIA releases its dual-GPU GM200 graphics card any sooner, is on course to becoming the fastest graphics card you can buy. It remains to be seen if AMD can cash in on the Holiday shopping season.
Source: VideoCardz, Image Courtesy Legit Reviews

NVIDIA Preparing a dual-GM200 Graphics Card

If it could make a dual-GK110 graphics card, the forgettable $2,999 GTX TITAN-Z, it's only conceivable that NVIDIA could launch one based on its newer and slightly more energy-efficient GM200 chips. According to a WCCFTech report, the company is doing just that. The dual-GPU GM200 graphics card could bear the company's coveted "GTX TITAN" branding, and could be a doubling of the GTX TITAN X, with twice as many CUDA cores (6,144 in all), TMUs (384 in all), ROPs (192 in all), and memory (24 GB in all), spread across two GPU systems, in an SLI-on-a-stick solution. It remains to be seen if NVIDIA gets the pricing wrong the second time.


Source: WCCFTech

AMD Didn't Get the R9 Fury X Wrong, but NVIDIA Got its GTX 980 Ti Right

This has been a roller-coaster month for high-end PC graphics. The timing of NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 980 Ti launch had us giving finishing touches to its review with our bags to Taipei still not packed. When it launched, the GTX 980 Ti set AMD a performance target and a price target. Then began a 3-week wait for AMD to launch its Radeon R9 Fury X graphics card. The dance is done, the dust has settled, and we know who has won - nobody. AMD didn't get the R9 Fury X wrong, but NVIDIA got its GTX 980 Ti right. At best, this stalemate yielded a 4K-capable single-GPU graphics option from each brand at $650. You already had those in the form of the $650-ish Radeon R9 295X2, or a pair GTX 970 cards. Those with no plans of a 4K display already had great options in the form of the GTX 970, and price-cut R9 290X.

The Radeon R9 290 series launch from Fall-2013 stirred up the high-end graphics market in a big way. The $399 R9 290 made NVIDIA look comically evil for asking $999 for the card it beat, the GTX TITAN; while the R9 290X remained the fastest single-GPU option, at $550, till NVIDIA launched the $699 GTX 780 Ti, to get people back to paying through their noses for the extra performance. Then there were two UFO sightings in the form of the GTX TITAN Black, and the GTX TITAN-Z, which made no tangible contributions to consumer choice. Sure, they gave you full double-precision floating point (DPFP) performance, but DPFP is of no use to gamers. So what could have been the calculation at AMD and NVIDIA as June 2015 approached? Here's a theory.
Image credit: Mahspoonis2big, Reddit

Inno3D Announces GeForce GTX 980 Ti iChill X4 Ultra

Inno3D announced its flagship GeForce GTX 980 Ti based graphics card, the GTX 980 Ti iChill X4 Ultra. The card derives its name from a gargantuan custom air cooling solution by the company, which features four fans - three cooling the main GPU heatsink; and one along the card's top, cooling the memory and VRM. The main heatsink, a little over 2 slots thick, features a meaty aluminium fin-stack heatsink, with two aluminium fin-stacks projecting from a central base. This heatsink is ventilated by three 100 mm fans, suspended on a metal shroud, which is easily detachable by turning a few thumb-screws. The second heatsink draws heat from the heatspreader covering the memory and VRM, using a flat heat pipe, dissipating it under air-flow by a 60 mm spinner.

The card offers factory-overclocked speeds of 1152 MHz core, 1241 MHz GPU Boost, and 7200 MHz (GDDR5-effective) memory; against reference speeds of 1000 MHz core, 1076 MHz GPU Boost, and 7012 MHz memory. The underlying PCB is NVIDIA reference design, featuring an 8-phase VRM, and 6-pin + 8-pin PCIe power connectors. Display outputs include one each of HDMI 2.0, dual-link DVI, and three DisplayPort 1.2 connectors. Expect the card to feature a 10% pricing premium over reference. Based on the 28 nm GM200 silicon, the GTX 980 Ti offers 2,816 CUDA cores, 176 TMUs, 96 ROPs, and a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 6 GB of memory. The card bundles a medium-sized mousepad with iChill branding, and a key to 3DMark (2013) Advanced.

AMD Radeon Graphics Roadmap for 2015 Leaked

It looks like AMD's desktop discrete GPU lineup for 2015 will see a mix of rebrands, re-codename, and one big new chip, all making up the new Radeon R7 300 and R9 300 series. Cards based in this lineup should begin rolling out this month. Leaks from OEMs such as this one, suggest that the first of these should begin rolling out as early as June 16.

The spread is pretty cut and dry. "Hawaii," the chip driving the R9 290 series, will not only get a new codename as "Grenada," but also a seamless rebrand to the R9 390 series, with Grenada Pro making up the R9 390, and Grenada XT making up the R9 390X. One possibility could be AMD taking advantage of low 4 Gbit GDDR5 chip prices to cram 8 GB of standard memory amount, across Grenada's 512-bit wide memory interface. The R9 390X will compete with the GeForce GTX 970, while the R9 390 will offer an option in the vast price and performance gorge between the GTX 960 and GTX 970.

NVIDIA Tapes Out "Pascal" Based GP100 Silicon

Sources tell 3DCenter.org that NVIDIA has successfully taped out its next big silicon based on its upcoming "Pascal" GPU architecture, codenamed GP100. A successor to GM200, this chip will be the precursor to several others based on this architecture. A tape-out means that the company has successfully made a tiny quantity of working prototypes for internal testing and further development. It's usually seen as a major milestone in a product development cycle.

With "Pascal," NVIDIA will pole-vault HBM1, which is making its debut with AMD's "Fiji" silicon; and jump straight to HBM2, which will allow SKU designers to cram up to 32 GB of video memory. 3DCenter.org speculates that GP100 could feature anywhere between 4,500 to 6,000 CUDA cores. The chip will be built on TSMC's upcoming 16 nanometer silicon fab process, which will finally hit the road by 2016. The GP100, and its companion performance-segment silicon, the GP104 (successor to GM204), are expected to launch between Q2 and Q3, 2016.

Source: 3DCenter.org

Manli Announces its GeForce GTX 980 Ti Graphics Card

Manli Technology Group Limited, the major Graphics Cards, Mini-PCs and other components manufacturer, today announced the ultimate graphics solution for gamers - Manli GeForce GTX 980Ti.

Powered by GM200 GPU, the Manli GeForce GTX 980Ti provides top tier gaming performance for gaming enthusiast. It built-in 2816 CUDA Cores, with core frequency is at 1000 MHz, base clock that can boost up to 1076 MHz, gamers can enjoy the ultimate gaming experience in HD and 4K UHD resolution, as well as headroom for overclocking via using TurboEngine software. The memory of 6GB GDDR5 ensures gamers can enjoy smooth and detailed gaming experience in DirectX 11 and incoming DirectX 12 new games.

MSI Announces its GeForce GTX 980 Ti Gaming Graphics Cards

MSI is excited to introduce the new flagship of the MSI GAMING graphics cards lineup: the MSI GTX 980 Ti GAMING 6G. This imposing new model is powered by NVIDIA's Maxwell GM200 GPU, yet running on significantly higher clockspeeds than the reference model. Combined with 6GB of GDDR5 memory, this enables gamers to enjoy a smooth 4K gaming experience. Featuring the award-winning Twin Frozr V thermal design, the MSI GTX 980 Ti GAMING 6G delivers unmatched cooling and acoustic performance. To bolster the premium look & feel, the MSI GTX 980 Ti GAMING 6G comes equipped with a solid metal backplate.

Besides the revered GAMING series, MSI are also introducing two reference models featuring exhaust thermal design. The MSI GTX 980 Ti 6GD5 will be available immediately, shortly followed by the MSI GTX 980 Ti 6GD5 V1, which comes equipped with an all new premium silver shroud and Military Class 4 Components for durable, solid performance.

NVIDIA Announces the GeForce GTX 980 Ti Graphics Card

NVIDIA announced the GeForce GTX 980 Ti, its latest high-end graphics processor. Positioned a notch below the GTX Titan X, and above the GTX 980, it is designed to offer playable frame-rates at 4K Ultra HD resolution, with high-levels of visual details. Based on the same 28 nm GM200 silicon as the GTX Titan X, the chip features 2,816 CUDA cores, carved out by disabling 2 of the 24 streaming multiprocessor units on the silicon; 176 TMUs, 96 ROPs, and a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 6 GB of memory.

The GeForce GTX 980 Ti features nearly identical clock speeds to the GTX Titan X, with 1000 MHz core, 1076 MHz GPU Boost, and 7012 MHz (GDDR5-effective) memory. The TDP is rated at 250W. The reference design card draws power from a combination of 6-pin and 8-pin PCIe power connectors. Display outputs include three DisplayPort 1.2, and one each of HDMI 2.0 and DVI connectors. The card is capable of 4-way SLI. NVIDIA board partners will launch custom-design variants of this card, with factory-overclocked speeds, and custom air- and liquid-cooled designs. It starts at US $649.99. With this launch, NVIDIA cut prices of the GeForce GTX 980 to $499.99.

ASUS, Gigabyte, and MSI GeForce GTX 980 Ti Reference Graphics Cards Pictured

Here are some of the first pictures of retail packages of NVIDIA's upcoming GeForce GTX 980 Ti graphics card, sold by ASUS, Gigabyte and MSI. The three are reference-design cards, which stick to reference speeds. A leaked retailer presentation by ASUS confirms the specifications of this SKU, as being based on the GM200 silicon, with 2,816 CUDA cores, and 6 GB of GDDR5 memory across its 384-bit wide memory interface. Reference clock speeds are almost identical to those of the GTX TITAN X, with 1000 MHz core, 1076 MHz GPU Boost, and 7012 MHz (GDDR5-effective) memory. The GTX 980 Ti launches in the first week of June.

Source: VideoCardz

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti Smiles for the Camera

Here are some of the first pictures of an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti graphics card, in the flesh. As predicted, the reference design board reuses the PCB of the GeForce GTX TITAN-X, and its cooler is a silver version of its older sibling. According to an older report, the GTX 980 Ti will be carved out of the 28 nm GM200 silicon, by disabling 2 of its 24 SMM units, resulting in a CUDA core count of 2,816. The card retains its 384-bit GDDR5 memory bus width, but holds 6 GB of memory, half that of the GTX TITAN-X. The card is expected to launch in early June, 2015. NVIDIA's add-in card (AIC) partners will be free to launch custom-design boards with this SKU, so you could hold out for the MSI Lightnings, the EVGA Classifieds, the ASUS Strixes, the Gigabyte G1s, and the likes.

Source: VideoCardz

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti Core Configuration Revealed

It looks like NVIDIA's GTX 980 Ti launch, which is imminent, won't be a repeat of the GTX 780 Ti, in that it won't be faster than the TITAN product at the time of launch. According to Korean tech publication HWBattle, the GTX 980 Ti will feature fewer CUDA cores than the GeForce GTX TITAN-X, at 2,816. NVIDIA gets that count by disabling 2 of the 24 SMM (streaming multiprocessor Maxwell) units on the GM200 silicon. The texture memory unit (TMU) count will be proportionately lower, at 176 (compared to 192 on the GTX TITAN-X). The ASIC bears the model number GM200-310, according to older reports.

We can't take a call on the ROP count and L3 cache amount. Normally we would deduce that it has a full complement of 96 ROPs, but given that Maxwell allows SKU designers to disable components in a way they previously couldn't, it's possible that the GTX 980 Ti could have a different ROP count than the GTX TITAN-X, just as the GTX 970 has a lower "effective" ROP count at 56, compared to the GTX 980, despite the same memory bus width. We know from other reports, that the GTX 980 Ti will feature 6 GB of memory. The TDP is a very arbitrary number, and 250W shouldn't surprise us. What also wouldn't surprise us is NVIDIA reusing the PCB and NVTTM (NVIDIA Time-to-Market) cooler design from the GTX TITAN-X (and several older SKUs). NVIDIA could allow its AIC (add-in- card) partners to come up with custom board designs from day-one.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti Launch Imminent

NVIDIA is ready with a new high-end graphics card that will be slotted between the GeForce GTX 980 and the GeForce GTX TITAN-X, in its product stack. The GeForce GTX 980 Ti, as it's being called, will launch within the next couple of weeks, and will be based on the company's GM200 silicon. The core-configuration of this chip remains unknown, but it is rumored to feature 6 GB of GDDR5 memory, half that of the GTX TITAN-X, across its 384-bit wide memory bus.

Back in March, it was reported that NVIDIA will launch this SKU only after Summer. An early June launch suggests that either NVIDIA is spooked about AMD's Radeon R9 390X and its fancy-named sibling, which are expected to launch in the third week of June, and wants to siphon off high-end GPU sales as gamers and enthusiasts wrap up their Summer builds/upgrades, to settle down for the season's big game launches; or the company is confident of its performance, and really wants the GTX 980 Ti to appear on performance graphs, in reviews of AMD's new products.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti Silicon Marked "GM200-310"

NVIDIA's upcoming high-end single-GPU graphics card, based on the GM200 silicon, which debuted with the GTX TITAN X, will feature a silicon marked "GM200-310." The SKU will be named GeForce GTX 980 Ti, and is more likely to be priced around the $600-650 mark, than replacing the $550 GTX 980 off the shelves. Going by the way NVIDIA re-positioned the GTX 780 to $499 with the introduction of the GTX 780 Ti, we imagine something similar could happen to the GTX 980. From what we gathered so far, the GTX 980 Ti will be based on the GM200 silicon. Its CUDA core count is unknown, but it wouldn't surprise us if it's unchanged from the GTX TITAN X. Its different SKU numbering shouldn't be an indication of its CUDA core count. GTX 780 Ti and GTX TITAN Black had different numbering, but the same CUDA core counts of 2,880.

The card will feature 6 GB of GDDR5 memory across the chip's 384-bit wide memory interface. It will feature five display outputs, similar to that of the GTX 980. Unlike with the GTX TITAN X, NVIDIA partners will have the freedom to launch custom-design GTX 980 Ti products from day-one. There are two theories doing rounds on when NVIDIA plans to launch this card. One suggests that it could launch in mere weeks from now, probably even on the sidelines of Computex. The other suggests that it will launch towards the end of Summer, as NVIDIA wants to make the most cash from its existing GTX 980 inventory.Source: VideoCardz

NVIDIA to Launch GeForce GTX 980 Ti After Summer

NVIDIA reportedly adjusted launch of the GeForce GTX 980 Ti, to after Summer, 2015. The company could be using the time to let the market digest existing inventories of the GTX 980 (and avoid the repeat of slow sales on its GTX 770), particularly in the early-Summer season, when PC enthusiasts and gamers tend to upgrade or build afresh. The time could also be spent to watch what AMD comes up with, for its Radeon R9 390X.

The R9 390X, scheduled for a June-July launch, is based on a silicon that looks competitive with the GM200 on paper, and introduces a few new features, such as high-bandwidth memory (HBM). The GTX 980 Ti could feature an identical core-configuration to the GTX TITAN X, but feature half the memory amount at 6 GB, different clock speeds, and freedom for add-in card (AIC) partners to innovate custom-design cards.

Source: SweClockers

MSI Announces its GeForce GTX TITAN X Graphics Card

As one of the world's leading brands in graphics cards, MSI is pleased to announce the availability of the impressive MSI GeForce GTX TITAN X. The full potential and power of the NVIDIA Maxwell GPU is now available to enthusiasts everywhere. Housing the world's most powerful GPU, the NVIDIA Maxwell GM200, the TITAN X features 3072 CUDA Cores and 12GB GDDR5 memory on a 384 bit bus. Making this card the ultimate choice for gamers looking for a smooth 4K gaming experience.

The true capabilities of the MSI GeForce TITAN X can be unleashed by using the MSI Afterburner overclocking utility. Allowing the adjusting of the core and memory clock speeds to explore the limits of this incredible beast. The MSI GeForce GTX TITAN X is the best choice for high-end gamers.

GIGABYTE Announces its GeForce GTX TITAN X

GIGABYTE rolled out its GeForce GTX TITAN graphics card (model: GV-NTITANXD5-12GD-B). The card is little more than GIGABYTE-specific bar-codes and GIGABYTE packaging, stuck onto a reference board. It offers reference clock speeds of 1002 MHz core, 1089 MHz GPU Boost, and 7012 MHz (GDDR5-effective) memory. Based on the 28 nm GM200 silicon, the GTX TITAN X offers 3,072 CUDA cores based on the "Maxwell" architecture, 192 TMUs, 96 ROPs, and a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 12 GB of memory. The card is priced at US $999.

NVIDIA Launches the GeForce GTX TITAN X

NVIDIA formally launched the GeForce GTX TITAN X, its flagship graphics card based on the "Maxwell" architecture, following its GDC 2015 unveiling. Based on the new 28 nm GM200 silicon, the GTX TITAN X packs 3,072 CUDA cores, 192 TMUs, 96 ROPs, and a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 12 GB of memory. With 50% more graphics processing muscle over its previous-generation (7.1 TFLOP/s), the card retains its 250W TDP rating, of its predecessor. The GTX TITAN will launch in reference-design, and will be priced at US $999.

More Radeon R9 390X Specs Leak: Close to 70% Faster than R9 290X

Earlier today, AMD reportedly showed its industry partners (likely add-in board partners) a presentation, which was leaked to the web as photographs, and look reasonably legitimate, at first glance. If these numbers of AMD's upcoming flagship product, the Radeon R9 390X WCE (water-cooled edition) hold up, then it could spell trouble for NVIDIA and its GeForce GTX TITAN X. To begin with, the slides confirm that the R9 390X will feature 4,096 stream processors, based on a more refined version of Graphics CoreNext architecture. The core ticks at speeds of up to 1050 MHz. The R9 390X could sell in two variants, an air-cooled one with tamed speeds, and a WCE (water-cooled edition) variant, which comes with an AIO liquid-cooling solution, which lets it throw everything else out of the window in psychotic and murderous pursuit of performance.

It's the memory, where AMD appears to be an early adopter (as its HD 4870 was the first to run the faster GDDR5). The R9 390X features a 4096-bit wide HBM memory bus, holding up to 8 GB of memory. The memory is clocked at 1.25 GHz. The actual memory bandwidth will yet end up much higher than the 5.00 GHz 512-bit GDDR5 on the R9 290X. Power connectors will be the same combination as the previous generation (6-pin + 8-pin). What does this all boil down to? A claimed single-precision floating point performance figure of 8.6 TFLOP/s. Wonder how NVIDIA's GM200 compares to that. AMD claims that the R9 390X will be 50-60% faster than the R9 290X, and we're talking about benchmarks such as Battlefield 4 and FarCry 4. The expectations on NVIDIA's upcoming product are only bound to get higher.


Source: VideoCardz

NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN-X Specs Revealed

NVIDIA's GeForce GTX TITAN-X, unveiled last week at GDC 2015, is shaping up to be a beast, on paper. According to an architecture block-diagram of the GM200 silicon leaked to the web, the GTX TITAN-X appears to be maxing out all available components on the 28 nm GM200 silicon, on which it is based. While maintaining the same essential component hierarchy as the GM204, the GM200 (and the GTX TITAN-X) features six graphics processing clusters, holding a total of 3,072 CUDA cores, based on the "Maxwell" architecture.

With "Maxwell" GPUs, TMU count is derived as CUDA core count / 16, giving us a count of 192 TMUs. Other specs include 96 ROPs, and a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 12 GB of memory, using 24x 4 Gb memory chips. The core is reportedly clocked at 1002 MHz, with a GPU Boost frequency of 1089 MHz. The memory is clocked at 7012 MHz (GDDR5-effective), yielding a memory bandwidth of 336 GB/s. NVIDIA will use a lossless texture-compression technology to improve bandwidth utilization. The chip's TDP is rated at 250W. The card draws power from a combination of 6-pin and 8-pin PCIe power connectors, display outputs include three DisplayPort 1.2, one HDMI 2.0, and one dual-link DVI.

Source: VideoCardz

NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN-X Pictured Up-close

Here are some of the first close-up shots of NVIDIA's new flagship graphics card, the GeForce GTX TITAN-X, outside Jen-Hsun Huang's Rafiki moment at a GDC presentation. If we were to throw in an educated guess, NVIDIA probably coined the name "TITAN-X" as it sounds like "Titan Next," much like it chose "TITAN-Z" as it sounds like "Titans" (plural, since it's a dual-GPU card). Laid flat out on a table, the card features an a matte-black colored reference cooling solution that looks identical to the one on the original TITAN. Other cosmetic changes include a green glow inside the fan intake, the TITAN logo, and of course, the green glow on the GeForce GTX marking on the top.

The card lacks a back-plate, giving us a peek at its memory chips. The card features 12 GB of GDDR5 memory, and looking at the twelve memory chips on the back of the PCB, with no other traces, we reckon the chip features a 384-bit wide memory interface. The 12 GB is achieved using twenty-four 4 Gb chips. The card draws power from a combination of 8-pin and 6-pin power connectors. The display I/O is identical to that of the GTX 980, with three DisplayPorts, one HDMI, and one DVI. Built on the 28 nm GM200 silicon, the GTX TITAN-X is rumored to feature 3,072 CUDA cores. NVIDIA CEO claimed that the card will be faster than even the previous generation dual-GPU flagship product by NVIDIA, the GeForce GTX TITAN-Z.


Source: MaximumPC

NVIDIA Unveils the GeForce GTX TITAN-X

NVIDIA surprised everyone at its GDC 2015 event, by unveiling its flagship graphics card based on the "Maxwell" architecture, the GeForce GTX TITAN-X. Although the unveiling was no formal product launch, and it didn't come with a disclosure of specs, but a look at the card itself, and a claim by no less than NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang, that the card will be faster than the current-gen dual-GPU GTX TITAN-Z, there are some highly plausible rumors about its specs doing the rounds.

The GTX TITAN-X is a single-GPU graphics card, expected to be based on the company's GM200 silicon. This chip is rumored to feature 3,072 CUDA cores based on the "Maxwell" architecture, and a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 12 GB of memory. NVIDIA is likely taking advantage of new 8 Gb GDDR5 chips. Even otherwise, achieving 12 GB using 4 Gb chips isn't impossible. The card itself looks nearly identical to the GTX TITAN Black, with its nickel alloy cooler shroud, with two differences - the "TITAN" marking towards the front of the card glows white, while the fan is decked with green lights, in addition to green glowing "GeForce GTX" logo on the top. You get to control the lighting via GeForce Experience. NVIDIA plans to run more demos of the card throughout the week.

Source: PC World
Return to Keyword Browsing