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AMD "Navi 14" and "Navi 12" GPUs Detailed Some More

The third known implementation of AMD's "Navi" generation of GPUs with RDNA architecture is codenamed "Navi 14." This 7 nm chip is expected to be a cut-down, mainstream chip designed to compete with a spectrum of NVIDIA GeForce GTX 16-series SKUs, according to a 3DCenter.org report. The same report sheds more light on the larger "Navi 12" GPU that could power faster SKUs competing with the likes of the GeForce RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Super. The two follow the July launch of the architecture debut with "Navi 10." There doesn't appear to be any guiding logic behind the numerical portion of the GPU codename. When launched, the pecking order of the three Navi GPUs will be "Navi 12," followed by "Navi 10," and "Navi 14."

"Navi 14" is expected to be the smallest of the three, with an estimated 170 mm² die-area, about 24 RDNA compute units (1,536 stream processors), and expected to feature a 128-bit wide GDDR6 memory interface. It will be interesting to see how AMD carves out an SKU that can compete with the GTX 1660 Ti, which has 6 GB of 192-bit GDDR6 memory. The company would have to wait for 16 Gbit (2 GB) GDDR6 memory chips, or piggy-back eight 8 Gbit chips to achieve 8 GB, or risk falling short of recommended system requirements of several games at 1080p, if it packs just 4 GB of memory.

NVIDIA RTX 2060 Super and RTX 2070 Super Chips Come in Three Variants Each. Flashing Possible?

While working on GPU-Z support for NVIDIA's new GeForce RTX Super cards, I noticed something curious. Each of the RTX 2060 Super and RTX 2070 Super is listed with three independent device IDs in the driver: 1F06, 1F42, 1F47 for the former and 1E84, 1EC2, 1EC7 for the latter. GeForce RTX 2080 Super on the other hand, like nearly every other NVIDIA SKU, uses only a single device ID (1E81). The PCI device ID uniquely identifies every GPU model, so the OS and driver can figure out what kind of device it is, what driver to use, and how to talk to it. I reached out to NVIDIA, for clarification, and never heard back from them besides an "interesting, I'll check internally" comment.

With no official word, I took a closer look at the actual values and remembered our NVIDIA segregates Turing GPUs article, that was part of the launch coverage for the initial GeForce RTX unveil. In that article, we revealed that NVIDIA is creating two models for each GPU, that are identical in every regard, except for name and price. If board partners want to build a factory-overclocked card, they have to buy the -A variant of the GPU, because only that is allowed to be used with an out of the box overclock. Manual overclocking by the users works exactly the same on both units.

AMD Retires the Radeon VII Less Than Five Months Into Launch

AMD has reportedly discontinued production of its flagship Radeon VII graphics card. According to a Cowcotland report, AMD no longer finds it viable to produce and sell the Radeon VII at prices competitive to NVIDIA's RTX 2080, especially when its latest Radeon RX 5700 XT performs within 5-12 percent of the Radeon VII at less than half its price. AMD probably expects custom-design RX 5700 XT cards to narrow the gap even more. The RX 5700 XT has a much lesser BOM (bill of materials) cost compared to the Radeon VII, due to the simplicity of its ASIC, a conventional GDDR6 memory setup, and far lighter electrical requirements.

In stark contrast to the RX 5700 XT, the Radeon VII is based on a complex MCM (multi-chip module) that has not just a 7 nm GPU die, but also four 32 Gbit HBM2 stacks, and a silicon interposer. It also has much steeper VRM requirements. Making matters worse is the now-obsolete "Vega" architecture it's based on, which loses big time against "Navi" at performance/Watt. The future of AMD's high-end VGA lineup is uncertain. Looking at the way "Navi" comes close to performance/Watt parity with NVIDIA on the RX 5700, AMD may be tempted to design a larger GPU die based on "Navi," with a conventional GDDR6-based memory sub-system, to take another swing at NVIDIA's high-end.

INNO3D Announces Its GeForce RTX SUPER Series

INNO3D, a leading manufacturer of pioneering high-end multimedia components and various innovations, is excited to announce the new INNO3D GeForce RTX SUPER Series. With great power comes great responsibility, and with the INNO3D GeForce RTX 2080, 2070, 2060 SUPER graphics cards you will surely do your favourite games justice by powering them with the Turing architecture packed with more oomph thanks to additional cores and higher clocks.

Our R&D team have been burning the midnight oil in order to have every conceivable version of the SUPER series, from the iCHILL Frostbite, iCHILL Black, iCHILL X3 Ultra and X3 to the Gaming OC X2 and X3, and of course the INNO3D TWIN X2 OC and Compact.

NVIDIA to Unveil GeForce RTX SUPER Lineup on July 2nd

NVIDIA has confirmed that they will be launching a new RTX series of gaming graphics cards, called RTX Super, on July 2nd. According to info from VideoCardz, there will be three models of the new GPUs at launch - RTX 2060 SUPER, RTX 2070 SUPER and RTX 2080 SUPER. The review embargo will lift on the same day as launch day for RTX 2060 SUPER and RTX 2070 SUPER, but the embargo for RTX 2080 SUPER will prevail until "later in July".

The embargo for custom cards based on the new SUPER GPUs will be delayed until July 9th, when we will get the first wave of new cards. There is no apparent reason for the delay, so we will need to find out more about that. Pricing is yet to be announced, but according to the source, it will be "later this week". As a reminder, from previous leaks we have seen that Super series is supposed to bring about 10-13% more CUDA cores to the GPU models, more memory and higher memory speeds.

NVIDIA's SUPER Tease Rumored to Translate Into an Entire Lineup Shift Upwards for Turing

NVIDIA's SUPER teaser hasn't crystallized into something physical as of now, but we know it's coming - NVIDIA themselves saw to it that our (singularly) collective minds would be buzzing about what that teaser meant, looking to steal some thunder from AMD's E3 showing. Now, that teaser seems to be coalescing into something amongst the industry: an entire lineup upgrade for Turing products, with NVIDIA pulling their chips up one rung of the performance chair across their entire lineup.

Apparently, NVIDIA will be looking to increase performance across the board, by shuffling their chips in a downward manner whilst keeping the current pricing structure. This means that NVIDIA's TU106 chip, which powered their RTX 2070 graphics card, will now be powering the RTX 2060 SUPER (with a reported core count of 2176 CUDA cores). The TU104 chip, which power the current RTX 2080, will in the meantime be powering the SUPER version of the RTX 2070 (a reported 2560 CUDA cores are expected to be onboard), and the TU102 chip which powered their top-of-the-line RTX 2080 Ti will be brought down to the RTX 2080 SUPER (specs place this at 8 GB GDDR6 VRAM and 3072 CUDA cores). This carves the way for an even more powerful SKU in the RTX 2080 Ti SUPER, which should be launched at a later date. Salty waters say the RTX 2080 Ti SUPER will feature and unlocked chip which could be allowed to convert up to 300 W into graphics horsepower, so that's something to keep an eye - and a power meter on - for sure. Less defined talks suggest that NVIDIA will be introducing an RTX 2070 Ti SUPER equivalent with a new chip as well.

EK Gives a Liquid Cooling Block Treatment to EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 FTW3 Cards

The EK-Vector FTW3 RTX 2080 RGB high-performance water blocks are specially designed for EVGA FTW3 versions of NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 graphics cards. The water blocks use the signature EK single slot slim look, and it covers the entire PCB length. This sophisticated cooling solution will transform your powerful EVGA graphics card into a minimalistic, elegant piece of hardware with accented RGB LED lighting. The block also features a unique aesthetic cover over the block Terminal which is designed to showcase the graphics card model via LEDs, visible from the side.

Colorful Brings it Shiniest New Toys to Computex 2019

Colorful always believed in shock-and-awe to market their overengineered graphics cards and motherboards; and the company did not disappoint this Computed. We saw their new iGame RTX 2080 Ti Kudan, a 5-fan monstrosity that could very well be the heaviest graphics card ever built. A triple-slot, triple-fan air-cooler copes with some of the heat from the GPU, all of the heat from the VRM and memory; while most of the heat is dissipated by a closed-loop liquid cooling solution that uses a massive radiator that's almost as big as a standard 360 mm x 120 mm, but only has two 120 mm spinners, and 1/3rd of its body made up of a coolant reservoir and integrated pump. The block over the GPU is entirely metal (both base and top), so it could shed some of its heat onto the card's heatsink. How fast is it? Well, out of the box it's a damp 1545 MHz, but has a "one-click OC" to 1815 MHz.

Manli Introduces GeForce RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti Gallardo Graphics Cards

Manli Technology Group Limited, one of the major Graphics Cards and other components manufacturers, today announced the superior ultimate edition of Gallardo series graphics solution - Manli GeForce RTXTM 2080 Ti & RTXTM 2080 Gallardo, addition of the latest valued software - Turbo Engine and LED Lighting Control. Two lightning flash across cooling cover, and flashing with stunning LED lights. Meanwhile, it is equipped with 5 composite copper heatpipes, and triple 90 mm fans to ensure working in a silent and cool condition.

COLORFUL Announces iGame G-One All-in-One Gaming PC

Colorful Technology Company Limited, professional manufacturer of graphics cards, motherboards and high-performance storage solutions is thrilled to announce its latest AIO creation for gamers featuring the latest in gaming hardware for the most unrivaled gaming experience in an AIO PC yet. The new COLORFUL iGame G-One All-in-One PC packs powerful hardware in a slim display removing the need for a dedicated tower for your components. The iGame G-One AIO PC features a stylish yet aggressive design which is sure get attention whatever the setting whether it be work or play. The COLORFUL iGame G-One All-in-One PC is expected to to have an MSRP of around $5000.

EK Releases EK-Vector Aorus GPU Water Blocks

EK Water Blocks, the Slovenia based water cooling gear manufacturer, is introducing its new generation of high-performance water blocks specially designed for Gigabyte Aorus GeForce RTX series graphics cards, based on Turing graphics processor.

The EK-Vector Aorus RTX high-performance water blocks are specially designed for Gigabyte Aorus version of NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2080 graphics cards. The water blocks use the signature EK single slot slim look, and it covers the entire PCB length. This sophisticated cooling solution will transform your powerful Aorus graphics card into a minimalistic, elegant piece of hardware with accented RGB LED lighting. The block also features a unique aesthetic cover over the block Terminal which is designed to showcase the graphics card model via LEDs, visible from the side.

Razer Unveils the New Razer Blade Pro 17 Flagship Laptop

Razer , the leading global lifestyle brand for gamers, today announced the release of their redesigned and reconfigured 17" gaming laptop, the Razer Blade Pro 17. Razer's new flagship gaming laptop has been rebuilt from the ground up. With its innovative design, best-in-class components, and abundant ports, the Razer Blade Pro 17 is the pinnacle of laptop gaming prowess.

"The new Blade Pro is the most powerful and versatile Razer laptop ever, capable of replacing the most powerful desktop computers," says Razer's Co-Founder and CEO Min-Liang Tan. "It is the perfect laptop for gamers who demand a large display, an insane amount of connectivity options, and excellent performance with no room for compromise."

EK Unveils Extended Compatibility EK-Vector RTX RE VGA Water Blocks

EK Water Blocks, the premium computer liquid cooling gear manufacturer, is introducing its new generation of extended compatibility high-performance water blocks specially designed for reference design based NVIDIA GeForce RTX graphics cards. The EK-Vector RE high-performance water blocks are an evolution of the original EK-Vector water block where the cooling engine is tweaked for even more performance with an optimized flow pattern.

The RE water blocks use the signature EK single slot slim look and cover the entire PCB length. This sophisticated cooling solution will transform your powerful NVIDIA graphics card into a minimalistic, elegant piece of hardware with accented RGB LED lighting in RGB variants. The block also features a unique aesthetic cover over the block Terminal which is designed to showcase the graphics card model via LEDs, visible from the side.

EK Water Blocks Announces EK-Vector Trio for MSI RTX 20-series Gaming Trio

The EK Vector Trio RTX water blocks are specially designed for multiple MSI Trio GeForce RTX Turing based graphics cards. The water block itself uses the signature EK single slot slim look, and it covers the entire PCB length. This sophisticated cooling solution will transform your powerful ROG graphics card into a minimalistic, elegant piece of hardware with accented RGB LED lighting. The block also features a unique aesthetic cover over the block Terminal which is designed to showcase the graphics card model via LEDs, visible from the side.

The water block comes in two different models tailor-made for either MSI Gaming Trio 2080 and MSI Gaming Trio 2080 Ti cards including the Gaming X variants which are factory overclocked. Each of them directly cools the GPU, VRAM and the VRM (voltage regulation module) as cooling liquid is channeled directly over these critical areas. This allows the graphics card to remain stable at high overclocks, intensive workloads and also enables it to run at its maximum Boost Clock. Ultimately, you can enjoy gaming at the highest possible performance of your graphics card, stutter-free in a low noise environment.

Glued Die on ASUS ROG Strix GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Affects Some Aftermarket Cooling Solutions

Update April 4th: This post has been corrected based on new information provided by ASUS, EKWB, as well as other parties. The original story mentioned a silent change to the glue used on the PCB which, as we now believe, is no longer the case in that ASUS is not to blame.

Update April 5th: ASUS has confirmed to us that there has been no PCB change (in terms of components and their heights), it's only a problem of tolerances due to the glue being liquid during production.

ASUS has glued the GPU die to the PCB for many generations, which helps ensure contact and avoids microfractures in the solder balls from physical force or thermal expansion. The nature of this glue, typically an epoxy resin, means that aftermarket cooling solutions, such as full cover or die-only water blocks, have to accommodate for this around the holes around the die. Previous graphics cards had no issue here, because the mounting holes were far away from the GPU die. With RTX 2080 Ti and its super large GPU chip this has changed, and there's only a few millimeters of space left. If a waterblock uses wider standoffs than the design merits, or if the glue spreads out farther than intended, it can result in poor/inconsistent contact between waterblock and the GPU, which in turn can lead to worse thermal performance than ideal.

This time, EK Waterblocks alerted us that the ROG Strix GeForce RTX 2080 Ti had poor contact and fitting issues with their GPU water block for the same, as seen in images below provided by their customer T. Hilal, which interferes with the four standoffs surrounding the package. EK recommends removing these standoffs to ensure a good fit and thermal paste spread, and this does not affect water block performance much in their internal testing. In previous such occasions, EK and others have had to come up with a second version of the block for added compatibility, however it remains to be seen if the ROG Strix GeForce RTX 2080 Ti will merit a similar treatment this time round. As an external reference, Phanteks has separately confirmed to us that their water block remains compatible.

EK Releases Aluminum Based Water Blocks for NVIDIA RTX Series Graphics Cards

EK Water Blocks, the market leader in PC custom liquid cooling, is announcing the expansion of their Fluid Gaming aluminum based custom loop liquid cooling line. With price and performance in mind, EK Fluid Gaming is an inexpensive ticket to the custom liquid cooling world. Following the release of copper blocks for NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 and 2080Ti cards, EK is now launching one aluminum water block that is cross-compatible with NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 and 2080Ti cards which use the reference PCB and layout.

The EK-AC GeForce RTX is a full-cover water block designed and developed in cooperation with NVIDIA and it fits several high-end NVIDIA GeForce RTX graphics cards. This water block directly cools the GPU, RAM as well as VRM (voltage regulation module) as water flows directly over these critical areas, thus allowing the graphics card to reach higher boost frequencies. The loud stock fan gets to be replaced by a slim-line minimalistic water block that will not only make your PC look better, but also make the graphics card perform better. Finally, you will be able to enjoy your favorite games in silence. This water block also comes with a sleek matte black backplate.

CORSAIR Hydro X Custom Watercooling Parts Up at Swiss Retailer + Visual Impressions

When we first had a glance of the CORSAIR Hydro X custom watercooling loop parts in action, we suspected they might have a CES debut. CES has come and gone since, with no word of the company's entry into this field. Their direct competitors, including Phanteks and Thermaltake, have since added to their respective product portfolios comprising fans, water blocks, coolants and radiators. Perhaps CORSAIR wanted the launch to not be overshadowed by the other product launches at the recent trade show, and perhaps the listings of the Hydro X products on Digitech.ch is a sign of things to come sooner than later. Read past the break for a more in-depth discussion on the various parts listed, based on our experience with this industry as a whole.

NVIDIA Updates RTX Game Bundle - Now Also Includes Metro Exodus

NVIDIA has updated their RTX game bundle, which offers users games whenever they purchase an elligible RTX graphics card. The bundle previously offered wither Anthem or Battlefield V, for gamers who purchased the RTX 2060 or 2070 graphics card; and both games for buyers of the RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti. Now, gamers who purchase NVIDIA's highest-performacne graphics cards also get to take Metro Exodus home, and buyers of the RTX 2060 and RTX 2070 can now choose that game over the others.

AMD Radeon VII Retested With Latest Drivers

Just two weeks ago, AMD released their Radeon VII flagship graphics card. It is based on the new Vega 20 GPU, which is the world's first graphics processor built using a 7 nanometer production process. Priced at $699, the new card offers performance levels 20% higher than Radeon RX Vega 64, which should bring it much closer to NVIDIA's GeForce RTX 2080. In our testing we still saw a 14% performance deficit compared to RTX 2080. For the launch-day reviews AMD provided media outlets with a press driver dated January 22, 2019, which we used for our review.

Since the first reviews went up, people in online communities have been speculating that these were early drivers and that new drivers will significantly boost the performance of Radeon VII, to make up lost ground over RTX 2080. There's also the mythical "fine wine" phenomenon where performance of Radeon GPUs significantly improve over time, incrementally. We've put these theories to the test by retesting Radeon VII using AMD's latest Adrenalin 2019 19.2.2 drivers, using our full suite of graphics card benchmarks.

EK Releases Vector RTX Series Blocks for ASUS ROG Strix Series Graphics Cards

EK Water Blocks, the Slovenia based water cooling gear manufacturer, is introducing its new generation water blocks for the popular ROG Strix GeForce RTX series graphics cards, based on Turing TU106, Turing TU104 and Turing TU102 graphics processor.

The inspiration for the new GPU block name "Vector" came from the sheer computing power of the graphics cards that are on the market today. Naming a water block "Full Cover" isn't enough these days, when the product is packed with unique features, such as these. The EK Vector Strix RTX water blocks are specially designed for multiple ROG Strix GeForce RTX Turing based graphics cards. The water block itself uses the signature EK single slot slim look, and it covers the entire PCB length. This sophisticated cooling solution will transform your powerful ROG graphics card into a minimalistic, elegant piece of hardware with accented RGB LED lighting. The block also features a unique aesthetic cover over the block Terminal which is designed to showcase the graphics card model via LEDs, visible from the side.

ASUS Intros GeForce RTX 2080 Dual EVO with Axial Tech Fans

ASUS today introduced the Dual GeForce RTX 2080 EVO series graphics cards, available in two variants based on factory-overclock. Positioned between its RTX 2080 Dual and RTX 2080 ROG Strix series, these cards are characterized by a unique 3-slot thick cooling solution that implements a pair of Axial Tech fans. These fans feature a barrier ring that runs along the periphery of the impeller to prevent lateral airflow, and guide all of it axially (downwards onto the heatsink). The card also features an idle fan-stop, which turns these fans off when the GPU temperature is below 55 °C.

The card draws power from a combination of 6-pin and 8-pin PCIe power connectors. Display outputs include three DisplayPort 1.4, an HDMI 2.0b, and a USB-C VirtualLink. As mentioned earlier, the card comes in two variants. The base variant "DUAL-RTX2080-8G-EVO" features NVIDIA-reference clock speeds of 1710 MHz GPU Boost, while the more premium "DUAL-RTX2080-A8G-EVO" comes with 1725 MHz GPU Boost. Memory frequency is untouched on both cards, at 14 Gbps (GDDR6-effective). The company didn't reveal pricing.

AMD to Unlock Professional Features for Radeon VII to Blunt RTX 2080's Ray-tracing Edge

To add value and give it a feature-set edge over the GeForce RTX 2080, AMD is reportedly preparing to unlock several professional graphics features for the Radeon VII that are otherwise exclusive to Radeon Pro series graphics cards. These features will be released by simply adding Radeon VII support to the upcoming Radeon Pro 19.Q1 software suite. You uninstall your Radeon Adrenalin 2019 Edition drivers and replace them with the Radeon Pro 19.Q1 drivers to access pro features.

These include access to ProRender, certifications for various 3D, CAD, and CGI suites, SecureMI security, enterprise virtualization, and more. Over 320 professional applications are certified for the Radeon Pro 19.Q1 drivers, all of which will seamlessly run on the Radeon VII. AMD will also introduce a feature that lets you switch between the Radeon Pro and Radeon Adrenalin drivers on-the-fly (without needing reboots), so you don't lose your ability to play the latest games with day-one optimizations from AMD. These drivers will make the Radeon VII an incredible value in the enterprise space, as the GPU offers performance rivaling professional graphics cards priced well north of $3,000. It also blunts the feature-set edge the RTX 2080 holds over the Radeon VII.

Mobile NVIDIA GeForce RTX GPUs Will Vary Wildly in Performance, Clocks Lowered Substantially

NVIDIA is in the process of rolling out the first implementations of its RTX 2000 series GPUs in mobile form, and if the going is as is being reported, it's going to be a little rough for users to actually extrapolate their performance from product to product. This is because manufacturers are apparently getting a whole lot of leeway in how to clock their products, according to their solution's thermal characteristics and design philosophy.

What this means is that NVIDIA's RTX 2080 Max-Q, for example, can be clocked as low as 735 MHz, which is a more than 50% downclock from its desktop counterpart (1,515 MHz). The non-Max-Q implementation of NVIDIA's RTX 2080, for now, seems to be clocked at around 1,380 MHz, which is still a close to 200 Mhz downclock. Of course, these lowered clocks are absolutely normal - and necessary - for these products, particularly on a huge chip such as the one powering the RTX 2080. The problem arises when manufacturers don't disclose clockspeeds of the GPU in their particular implementation - a user might buy, say, an MSI laptop and an ASUS one with the exact same apparent configuration, but GPUs operating at very different clockspeeds, with very different levels of performance. Users should do their due research when it comes to the point of choosing what mobile solution sporting one of these NVIDIA GPUs they should choose.

MSI Also Unveils the Trident X Series SFF Gaming Desktops

MSI, a pioneer and global leader in gaming, continues to innovate its desktop product line and has built upon its strong heritage of delivering the first desktop built for Pro gamers. Today, MSI proudly introduces the brand new Trident X Series with the latest MSI GeForce RTX 2080 graphics card and the Intel 9th Gen Core K series processors.

The MSI Trident X series is the first compact desktop PC to incorporate an SFX power supply and the breathtaking latest MSI GeForce RTX graphics card, into a case only 10 liters in volume. Trident X series targeted gamers who demand the highest game performance from PC. With the Intel 9th Gen Core K series processors and MSI GeForce RTX graphics card, Trident X series can provide impressive performance for any task including gaming and video editing.

Colorful Announces GeForce RTX 2080 Sans Cooler for Waterblock Afficionados

Colorful will be offering a cooler-less version of their RTX 2080 iGame Vulcan Advanced graphics card. The engineering effort on this graphics card is simple: just take off the entire triple-fan cooling solution that usually ships with the graphics card, lower the pricing by the appropriate reduction in BOM costs (or close to it), and offer a slightly cheaper alternative for users that would be investing in a watercooling solution anyway.

Colorful, being one of the biggest players in the Chinese market, where iCafes are all the rage, offers these particularly interesting cooler-less versions for those businesses that want to keep heat dissipation through the room to a minimum. It seems the graphics card' design closely mimics that of NVIDIA's reference deign, which should maximize waterblock compatibility.
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