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Palit Regulatory Filing Suggests NVIDIA Planning Joint Announcement of Three "Ti" SKUs

A regulatory filing by Palit with the Eurasian Economic Commission (EEC) for several of its upcoming custom-design graphics cards, points to the possibility that NVIDIA is preparing to announcing three GeForce RTX 30-series Ti desktop graphics card SKUs in one go. These include the much talked about GeForce RTX 3080 Ti, the RTX 3070 Ti, and the RTX 3050 Ti.

From these, the RTX 3080 Ti is positioned between the RTX 3080 and RTX 3090, possibly helping NVIDIA better compete against the Radeon RX 6900 XT. The RTX 3070 Ti improves the company's competitiveness against the RX 6800. The new RTX 3050 Ti could carve out a performance class for itself, and as yet AMD lacks any desktop SKUs below the RX 6700 XT from the current generation, at least in the retail channel. The three cards could be launched in Q2-2021.

NVIDIA Silently Relaunching RTX 30-series with "Lite Hash Rate" Silicon Edition

Remember that story regarding NVIDIA relaunching a new RTX 3060 SKU that actually does limit the hash rate for Ethereum mining workloads? Well, not only has it been cemented, but it also has been expanded. Reports are coming in that all but confirm that NVIDIA is on its way to provide its partners with updated silicon that should put mining performance of their RTX 30-series cards into a less palatable price-performance territory for would-be miners. That, in turn, should bring them closer to NVIDIA's CMP (Crypto Mining Processor) cards instead - and as wanted by both the company and consumers.

According to the sources, the new graphics cards will be indistinguishable from those that are still in transit or in stock (all two of them worldwide, of course). NVIDIA is internally describing the revised silicon as "Lite Hash Rate", and that is the message they communicate with AIBs. Apparently, the new "Lite Hash Rate" graphics cards will range throughout the entirety of NVIDIA's already-released RTX 30-series portfolio, from the ill-fated RTX 3060 up to the RTX 3080 Ti - the only absent graphics card is the RTX 3090, apparently, which could mean that NVIDIA is confident enough on that graphics card's cost being too high to be attractive to miners - especially when you consider how much more they are going for above the MSRP that was half-heartedly slapped on it. The new chips carry an update to their SKU identification - the GA102-200 chip that powers the RTX 3080 is being revised to GA102-202, as will all other chips made "lite" in this way. Expect the new cards to start hitting retail come June.

Once Again, NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang to Showcase What's Been Cooking for GTC - From His Kitchen

Remember that time when NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang pulled the company's HGX system (based on Ampere GA100) out of his own oven? Well, it seems we might be looking at something similar come GTC, which is set for April 12th. The event will again take place solely via online transmissions and announcements due to the still heavily-grassing COVID-19 pandemic, and NVIDIA teased a new kick-off presentation from its CEO - from his kitchen.

NVIDIA has usually taken GTC as an opportunity to showcase products not for the consumer segment, however, so temper your expectations. You should also likely temper your expectations regarding Huang taking enough RTX 30-series graphics cards form his oven to satisfy the incredible demand and stock issues we've been seeing with NVIDIA's latest and greatest. What we could be looking for (as an appetizer to this year's over 1500 presentations) are products focused on the professional computing markets, from quantum computing to AI, passing through RTX Ampere accelerators for professionals, NVIDIA Drive products, as well as Jetson announcements. NVIDIA did warn some surprises might be in store, but again, this doesn't mean these are surprises aimed at consumer gaming products. Catch up on NVIDIA's official announcement and a previously-released GTC retrospective video after the break.

A Sign of the Times: Hong Kong Authorities Dismantle Smuggling Operation... Which Included 300 NVIDIA CMP Cards

A sign of the times indeed, when secretive, smuggling boats add NVIDIA CMP graphics cards to their cargo instead of other illegal goods. That's what just happened in Hong Kong, where authorities with the Hong Kong Customs and Excise Department seized a smuggling fishing boat that was unsuspectingly (or maybe not so unsuspectingly) anchored just outside the Hong Kong International Airport. While some of the smuggled goods were par of the course for the authorities - exotic foods and high-value, low-footprint technological gadgets such as smartphones and tablets - the smugglers were also carrying 300 unmarked NVIDIA CMP 30HX GPUs.

That they were unmarked means they were deviated from the assembly lines before they were actually processed for final packaging, and thus we're now looking at definite proof of shipments being deviated from their intended destinations - which means this happens not only for CMP cards, but also for consumer-grade RTX 30-series. Another day at the office of post-COVID, production shortages, and mining boom, as it relates to computer hardware pieces.

ASUS: "Lower Yields Upstream" Responsible for Lack of NVIDIA Chips

In a recent ASUS investor call from March 17th, a company representative explained the company's financial outlook and what it sees as its successes and failures in Q42020. In it, the company referenced the lack of NVIDIA graphics cards to satisfy demand as one of the major hurdles it has had to face. As the company said, "Our guess is that the gap might have been caused by lower yields upstream. As for when [Nvidia] can increase that yield is something hard for us to predict."

This is likely the clearest indicator we've had since NVIDIA's RTX 30-series launch that there is more than a demand problem for NVIDIA's Ampere graphics cards - there's a yield one as well. NVIDIA could have simply failed to predict demand for its graphics cards in wake of the recent cryptomining craze, and asome theorize a miscalculated allocation of wafers with Samsung on expectations of lower demand post-holiday season. That one doesn't make much sense, as by that time, COVID and its effects on tech market demand were already pretty clear. And while NVIDIA certainly doesn't have all available capacity at Samsung's 8 nm at its disposal, there should certainly be more available capacity for NVIDIA's RTX 30-series than say, for AMD's Navi graphics cards, which have to share the 7 nm wafers with virtually all other AMD products (from CPUs to mobile chips to enterprise solutions). The idea of lower upstream yields than would be ideal for NVIDIA does certainly come as a possible reason - a change in foundry partner comes with certain additional difficulties in adapting the design to that given processes' strengths and issues. As always, we'll just have to wait and see.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ti and RTX 3080 Ti Alleged Memory Specs and ASIC Codes Surface

An add-in card partner source shared with VideoCardz some juicy details about a pair of upcoming high-end GeForce RTX 30-series "Ampere" graphics cards. Called the GeForce RTX 3070 Ti and GeForce RTX 3080 Ti, the two are aimed to restore NVIDIA's competitiveness against the likes of AMD's recent Radeon RX 6000 series GPUs. It looks like NVIDIA doesn't want to play the memory size game just yet, despite giving the RTX 3060 12 GB of it.

The GeForce RTX 3070 Ti appears to be maxing out the GA104 silicon and carries the ASIC code "GA104-400-A#." The current RTX 3070 enables all but one of the TPCs on the GA104, working out to 5,888 CUDA cores. The new RTX 3070 Ti probably maxes out the GA104 to its CUDA core count of 6,144. The more substantial upgrade, however, is memory. The card ditches 14 Gbps GDDR6 for fast GDDR6X memory of an unknown speed—probably higher than 16 Gbps. The memory size remains 8 GB, across 256-bit.

MSI Releases GeForce RTX 3080, RTX 3070 SUPRIM SE Models

MSI has added another pair of graphics cards to its RTX 30-series staple. After introducing a new pinnacle-tier brand in the form of the SUPRIM X, which packs what best engineering MSI's engineers can muster, the company has now launched SUPRIM SE versions of the RTX 3080 and RTX 3070 graphics cards. The difference is in the details: mainly, in the factory overclock and TDP. While the SUPRIM X cards feature MSI's highest TDP (280 W) and clocks (1920 MHz), the SUPRIM SE are much milder in those respects (240 W and 1785 MHz, respectively), while keeping MSI's SUPRIM cooler and power delivery design.

The lower clockspeeds probably signal slightly lower quality silicon than the one that goes into the SUPRIM X cards, but that also means lower pricing for essentially the same card. And who knows, you might be chosen by the silicon lottery should you choose this model's better-engineered innards compared to other MSI cards. Apparently, the cards are only available in some regional MSI websites, which may mean slow rollout to other markets, or their absence from their entirely.

GIGABYTE Intros GeForce RTX 3060 VISION Graphics Card for Creators

GIGABYTE today introduced the GeForce RTX 3060 VISION graphics card targeted at creators. This is the company's fourth such card based on an "Ampere" series GPU. When paired with NVIDIA's GeForce Studio drivers, the card provides a formidable feature-set and optimization for content creation suites, making this a quasi-ProVis graphics card.

The design of the card is similar to most other RTX 30-series VISION cards—a large white cooler shroud hides an aluminium fin-stack heatsink. This shroud is topped off with a brushed aluminium plate. The cooler is optimized for low-noise, and idle fan-stop, and features fans with graphene-lubricated double ball-bearing fans. Airflow from the third fan flows through the card, and out from a cutout on the back-plate. The card pulls power from a single 8-pin PCIe power connector. You also get a handy factory-overclock of 1837 MHz boost (vs. 1777 MHz reference). Display outputs include two each of HDMI 2.1 and DisplayPort 1.4a connectors. The card is expected to be priced around $400.

GeForce RTX 3060 Already Hits Second-Hand Market as NVIDIA Sours the Milk for Miners

NVIDIA's yet-to-be-released GeForce RTX 3060 "Ampere" graphics card has already hit the second-hand graphics card market, as those with early access to RTX 3060 inventory have begun re-selling it. Belarusian tech marketplace Onliner listed these GIGABYTE RTX 3060 Eagle OC custom-design graphics cards for 2,800 BYN (USD $1,080) a piece, from a lot of three cards.

NVIDIA announced that the company plans to tackle the problem of crypto-currency miners soaking up inventory of GeForce "Ampere" graphics cards, beginning by designing the GeForce RTX 3060 to be bad at mining, putting out half the hash-rate it normally should, with the specs at its disposal. The company claims to be using an elaborate mechanism to enforce this hash-rate limiting, so miners can't work around by modifying the drivers. We're also hearing that the company could revise other RTX 30-series "Ampere" products with hashrate limiters, so they become unviable for crypto mining.

NVIDIA Announces New CMP Series Specifically Designed for Cryptocurrency Mining; Caps Mining Performance on RTX 3060

This is a big one: NVIDIA has officially announced a new family of products specifically designed to satiate the demand coming from cryptocurrency mining workloads and farms. At the same time, the company has announced that the RTX 3060 launch driver will include software limitations for cryptocurrency mining workloads specifically correlated with Ethereum mining, essentially halving the maximum theoretical hashrate that could be achieved from a purely hardware perspective. The new family of products, termed CMP (Crypto Mining Processor) series, will see its products under the HX branding, and will be available in four different tiers: 30HX, 40HX, 50HX and 90HX. These products will not have any display outputs, and therefore are not applicable for gaming scenarios.

NVIDIA's stance here is that their new product will bring some justice in the overall distribution of its GeForce graphics cards, which are marketed and meant for gaming workloads. The new cryptocurrency-geared series will be distributed by NVIDIA authorized partners in the form of ASUS, Colorful, EVGA, Gigabyte, MSI, Palit, and PC Partner (more may be added down the line). There is currently no information on what silicon actually powers these graphics cards; and of course, the success of this enterprise depends on A) the driver restrictions not being limited to the RTX 3060 graphics card - it isn't clear from NVIDIA's press release if other RTX 30-series graphics cards will see the same performance cap. Even if NVIDIA did release those drivers, however, cryptocurrency miners would just opt to, well, not update them. So it is possible that NVIDIA will release a revision of the RTX 3090, RTX 3080, RTX 3070 and RTX 3060 Ti with silicon enhancements that will only work with the latest GeForce drivers - after allowing the channels to move all of their existing, cryptocurrency-enabled stock.

ASUS ROG Zephyrus Duo 15 Owners are Applying Custom GPU vBIOS with Higher TGP Presets

With NVIDIA's GeForce RTX 30-series lineup of GPUs, laptop manufacturers are offered a wide variety of GPU SKUs that internally differ simply by having different Total Graphics Power (TGP), which in turn results in different clock speeds and thus different performance. ASUS uses NVIDIA's variant of GeForce RTX 3080 mobile GPU inside the company's ROG Zephyrus Duo (GX551QS) with a TGP of 115 Watts, and Dynamic Boost technology that can ramp up the card to 130 Watts. However, this doesn't represent the maximum for RTX 3080 mobile graphics card. The maximum TGP for RTX 3080 mobile goes up to 150 Watts, which is a big improvement that lets the GPU reach higher frequencies and more performance.

Have you ever wondered what would happen if you manually applied vBIOS that allows the card to use more power? Well, Baidu forum users are reporting a successful experiment of transforming their 115 W RTX 3080 to 150 W TGP card. Using GPU vBIOS from MSI Leopard G76, which features a 150 W power limit, and applying it to the ROG's Zephyrus Duo power-limited RTX 3080 cards is giving results. Users have successfully used this vBIOS to squeeze out more performance from their laptops. As seen on the 3D Mark Time Spy rank list, the entries are now dominated solely by modified laptops. Performance improvement is, of course, present and it reaches up to a 20% increase.

In a Bid for Transparency, NVIDIA Requires Laptop Manufacturers to List GPU Specs for RTX 3000 Series

It seemed has if NVIDIA was dropping the Max-P and Max-Q differentiators for their mobile graphics card, which would throw consumers into disarray and confusion as to what exactly was the performance of the graphics card built into their RTX 30-series laptop. In essence, due to the RTX 30-series configurable TGP (Total Graphics Power), as well as each laptop's own capability of supplying power and cooling to that chip, users might see themselves in situations such as their mobile RTX 3080 offering lower performance than a mobile RTX 3070, configured for a higher TGP. This meant that more attentive users would have to hunt for reviews of the laptops they were eyeing, or to be forced to count on system manufacturers to actually list specifications for the included graphics solution in their laptops. This would mean, more often than not, something akin to chaos, and could in truth impact NVIDIA's brand recognition and consumer confidence in expected performance.

NVIDIA, as a way to circumvent this, has decided to not only encourage, but actually require that manufacturers list their graphics cards' TGP as well as specific clock speed stats on their online product pages. Some manufacturers, such as Asus, Acer, Razer, Origin, MSI, Alienware, and Gigabyte have already updated some product pages - but not all. An NVIDIA spokesperson clarified to The Verge that "We're requiring OEMs to update their product pages to the Max-Q technology features for each GeForce laptop, as well as clocks and power — which communicates the expected GPU performance in that system." Perhaps that will help consumers make a more informed decision.
NVIDIA reference specs example ASUS Laptop TGP Listing

Cincoze Unveils GeForce RTX 30-series and Quadro T1000-series MXM Upgrade Cards

Cincoze, a professional manufacturer of embedded systems, expands the Cincoze GM-1000's machine vision application performance with two new Quadro MXM GPU modules. Building on the GM-1000's powerful processing base, the MXM-RTX3000 and MXM-T1000 provide the additional GPU capacity for rapid adoption of machine vision in smart factories, from simple environmental perception applications such as positioning, measurement, identification, and sorting, to more complex vision-guided automation functions. GPU requirements for each scenario are different, so specifications must match the environment and application. The two new Quadro MXM GPU modules broaden the GM-1000's available selection to cover a wider range of uses.

The GM-1000—part of the Cincoze GOLD series—is positioned as a high-performance machine vision system featuring high computing performance, high-speed I/O, and industrial-grade reliability. It is the preferred choice for machine vision system integrators and AOI (Automated Optical Inspection) manufacturers. The GM-1000's unique carrier board can be matched with a selection of Cincoze MXM GPU modules, including the MXM-RTX3000, MXM-T1000, MXM-P2000, and MXM-E9174, providing a precise match for different computing requirements.

MSI Announces AGESA ComboPI V2 1.2.0.0 BIOS Updates for AMD 500 and 400 Series

MSI announced that it will begin rolling out UEFI firmware updates for its Socket AM4 motherboards based on the AMD 400-series and 500-series chipsets, which incorporate AMD's latest AGESA Combo PI V2 1.2.0.0 microcode. These firmware updates will enable resizable BAR support for NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30-series "Ampere" graphics cards, improvements for Ryzen 5000 series "Vermeer" desktop processors, and an assortment of board model-specific improvements or fixes.

The company will begin releasing these firmware updates for its AMD 500-series chipset motherboards, and its AMD 400-series "MAX" models in January 2021. In February, it will follow up with updates for AMD 400-series non-"MAX" models. The "MAX" model name suffix for an MSI AMD 400-series motherboard denotes a board with a 32-megabyte SPI flash ROM chip that allows MSI to cram in its feature-rich ClickBIOS setup program. Keep checking the "support" section of your motherboard's product page on the MSI website for these firmware updates.

NVIDIA RTX 3080 Ti, Eventual SUPER Revisions Allegedly Postponed Indefinitely Amidst Supply Woes

Everyone and their mother expected NVIDIA to announce - if not a SUPER refresh to their existing graphics cards with increased memory sizes - at least the RTX 3080 Ti. That card surfaced as a planned NVIDIA counter to AMD's preemptive pricing of $999 on its RX 6900 XT graphics card (which to be fair, is in itself as abundant a card as unicorns this side of the galaxy). GamersNexus reported NVIDIA partners' comments on the indefinite postponement of the RTX 3080 Ti and possible SUPER derivatives of the RTX 30-series lineup. It's being said that NVIDIA decided (smartly, I would say) to ensure consistent supply of their existing lineup to sate demand, instead of dispersing its limited chip production across even more product lines.

This would result, I have no doubt, on NVIDIA only having even more SKUs out of stock than they currently do. Considering the market's current state of mind in regards to NVIDIA's lineup, this seems like the most sensible decision possible. TechPowerUp has in the meantime confirmed this information with NVIDIA partners themselves.

NVIDIA Evaluates Cryptocurrency Mining GPU Production

During the 19th Annual J.P. Morgan Tech/Auto Forum Conference, NVIDIA has talked about the possibility of special graphics cards dedicated to mining purposes. The special edition crypto mining GPU is a form of graphics card that has no display outputs, and possibly a few defective texture units. Usually, GPUs that end up with defective texture units end up as waste, however, as crypto mining requires only the compute element from the GPU, these products could be rebranded as mining GPUs. But, it seems like NVIDIA is currently somewhere in the middle ground and weighing in whatever the company sees something like that as a feasible option.

During the conference, NVIDIA's Colette Kress, a chief financial officer, had said a few things about the possible production of GPUs dedicated to crypto mining. "If crypto demand begins or if we see a meaningful amount, we can also use that opportunity to restart the CMP [mining-specific GPUs] product line to address ongoing mining demand," said Ms. Kress. She added that "We [NVIDIA] don't have visibility on how much of the GeForce RTX 30-series end demand comes from mining. So, we don't believe it's a big part of our business today. Gaming demand is very strong, and we think that's larger than our current supply." And that is an understandable thing. Right now crypto mining is hot because of Bitcoin's price, however, NVIDIA can't predict if it will crash a lot or not, so the company doesn't want to risk starting a big production for something that can burst like a bubble.

MSI Unveils Innovations in Gaming Hardware & Computing at MSI Premiere 2021

MSI, a world leader in gaming hardware and computing solutions, unveils an innovative lineup of gaming, creator and business products at its virtual launch event, "MSI Premiere 2021: Tech For the Future". A powerful MSI Dragon G opened the "MSI Premiere 2021: Tech For the Future" show, followed by a helicopter that flew over the sea and revealed MSI RTX 30 SEA HAWK.

MSI SEA HAWK is the product of a revolutionary design with proven technology — which just got faster with an upgrade to the GeForce RTX 30 Series. The combined advantages of both air and liquid cooling come together with dedicated fan cooling and an all-in-one closed-loop liquid cooling solution that is efficient, silent and requires absolutely no maintenance.

Following ASUS' Lead, EVGA and ZOTAC Increase NVIDIA RTX 30-series Pricing

ASUS was the first AIC partner to announce that due to increased costs in procuring supplies and components for PC component manufacture, it would be increasing prices on its motherboards and graphics cards. That announcement from ASUS seems to have opened the floodgates on other manufacturers, as now both EVGA and ZOTAC have increased pricing for their graphics cards - specifically for NVIDIA's RTX 30-series.

EVGA took a similar approach to ASUS, and announced via its website the changes in pricing and their effective date - January 11th. The company's announcement (which you can read in full after the break) sees pricing increase at around $70 across the board of already-launched NVIDIA RTX 30-series graphics cards. The company will still honor users in the queue system for a new graphics card with the previous pricing structure, should their orders complete through April 16th.

NVIDIA Details its Resizable-BAR Feature Rollout, Eligible Products

NVIDIA on Tuesday announced a roll-out of its implementation of the PCI-SIG resizable base-address register (BAR) feature to select GeForce products. The feature enables your CPU to see the entire video memory of your graphics card as one addressable block, rather than through 256 MB apertures. This should improve certain kinds of 3D rendering workloads, and game engines that are optimized to use it should see a tangible performance boost. AMD earlier introduced the exact same feature under its marketing name "Smart Access Memory," with its Radeon RX 6000 series.

NVIDIA announced that resizable-BAR support will be made available to GeForce RTX 30-series "Ampere" desktop graphics cards, notebooks that have RTX 30-series "Ampere" mobile GPUs, and future products. The support requires not just a compatible graphics card, but also a motherboard that supports the feature. Most leading motherboard- and OEM desktop manufacturers began rolling out resizable-BAR support through UEFI firmware updates. Using the feature requires you to run your machine in native UEFI mode (with CSM disabled).

NVIDIA GeForce RTX: Game On Event: Live Blog

NVIDIA VP for GeForce, Jeff Fisher hosts the new GeForce RTX: Game On digital event on the sidelines of the 2021 International CES. We expect NVIDIA to unveil its new GeForce RTX 30-series "Ampere" mobile GPUs powering next-gen gaming notebooks; possible additions to its desktop RTX 30-series, including the all-important RTX 3060 and RTX 3050, and maybe some tweaks to the high-end segment. NVIDIA has a knack of surprising us with new gamer-relevant features with such presentations.

Update 17:00 UTC: Here we go, with a quick recap of 2020.

Lenovo Confirms Various Upcoming GeForce RTX 30-series SKUs

Lenovo may have inadvertently disclosed the existence of several upcoming GeForce RTX 30-series graphics cards. The Product Specifications Reference (PSREF) document for a certain Lenovo pre-built gaming desktop model, the Legion R5 28IMB05, lists out all its possible hardware options, covering CPU, graphics cards, and storage. The CPU options cover 10th Gen Core "Comet Lake-S" models that are already out; but things get interesting with the list of graphics options. In addition to certain RTX 20-series, and GTX 16-series SKUs, the list mentions certain RTX 30-series SKUs that haven't yet been announced by NVIDIA.

Among these unreleased GPUs are the GeForce RTX 3050, which is shown featuring 4 GB of GDDR6 memory; the GeForce RTX 3050 Ti with 6 GB of it; and the GeForce RTX 3060 (non-Ti) with 12 GB of it. The already-launched RTX 3070 also finds mention here. It's likely that these are OEM-exclusive SKUs, but if they're not, then we have our first look at how NVIDIA is handling product segmentation between the RTX 3050 Ti and the RTX 3060 (non-Ti), in a possible bid to avoid a repeat of the GTX 1060 3 GB vs. 6 GB confusion (where besides memory, the two SKUs also had different core-configurations). Based on the GA106 silicon, the GeForce RTX 3060 (non-Ti) is expected to feature a 192-bit wide GDDR6 memory interface, which it populates with 12 GB of memory.

Rumor: NVIDIA RTX 3080, 3070, 3060 Mobile Specifications Detailed

Apparently, specifications for NVIDIA's upcoming RTX 30-series mobile solutions have been made public. According to Videocardz via Notebookcheck, NVIDIA will introduce three mobile versions of their RTX 30-series graphics cards in the form of the RTX 3080, RTX 3070 and RTX 3060. Like past NVIDIA mobile solutions, these won't directly correspond, hardware-wise, to their desktop counterparts; NVIDIA has the habit of downgrading their mobile solutions' chips compared to their desktop counterparts. According to the leaked specifications, this means the mobile RTX 3080 will maker use of the company's GA-104 chip, instead of the GA-102 silicon found on desktop versions of the card.

The mobile RTX 3080 should thus feature a total of 6,144 CUDA cores, as present in the fully-enabled GA-104 chip (compare that to the 5,888 CUDA cores available on the desktop RTX 3070, and the 8,704 CUDA cores available on the RTX 3080). These CUDA cores would be clocked at up to 1.7 GHz. The memory bus should also see a cut down to 256-bit, which would allow NVIDIA to distribute as many as 4 versions of the RTX 3080 mobile: Max-Q (TGP 80-90 W), Max-P (TGP 115-150 W), with either 8 GB or 16 GB of GDDR6 memory. The RTX 3070 mobile keeps the GA-104 chip, 256-bit bus and GDDR6 memory subsystem (apparently with only 8 GB memory pool available), but further cuts down CUDA cores to 5,120 (Max-Q TGP 80-90 W, Max-P TGP 115-150 W). Finally, the RTX 3060 mobile should make use of the GA106 chip, set up with 3,072 available CUDA cores and a 192-bit memory bus across its 6 GB of GDDR6 VRAM pool (Max-Q TGP 60-70 W), Max-P (TGP 80-115 W). Expect these specs to be confirmed (or not) come January 12th.

A Christmas Miracle: 500,000 NVIDIA RTX 3080 Cards Found in Lost Shipping Container

Stock for NVIDIA's latest RTX 30-series graphics cards has been a nightmare for customers across the world, with demand far outstripping supply. This opened up a proverbial can of worms, with scalpers taking to the world wide web, casting their own nets in taking advantage of not only the pandemic (and peoples' refuge in gaming in these uncertain times), but also of said unmet demand. So it has to be nothing short of a Christmas miracle that 500,000 NVIDIA RTX 3080 graphics cards have just been found in an unmarked shipping container in South Korea. The container wasn't registered in the port authority, and was therefore left unopened and unprocessed.

The graphics cards were stored in the container absent of any proper documentation by Samsung, as early as August of this year. Jeff Fisher, vice president of NVIDIA and head of the GeForce division, said in a statement to the company's shareholders that "We've been asking Samsung for this shipment for months. They told us that she had already left the factory, but then they did not present us with any document proving that she had reached her destination". These newfound graphics cards will now be correctly processed and put into the channel.

Geeknetic.es made this as a part of the Spanish Fool's Day, which is December 28th. However, considering the current state of the RTX (and AMD RX) market, this is a nice satirical gotcha which I'll keep on TPU. Let's laugh at our misery instead of wallowing in it.

ZOTAC Releases GeForce RTX 30-series PGF Graphics Cards in China

ZOTAC has had a rather spartan custom RTX 30-series lineup in the West, with only its Trinity, Twin-Edge, and Holo board designs covering the RTX 3080 and RTX 3090 series. The company plans to change this, with the introduction of a better endowed custom board series, under the PGF series. ZOTAC debuted the PGF brand with the GeForce GTX 10-series "Pascal" family, mostly in the Greater China region, and targeted at enthusiasts. The RTX 20-series "Turing" didn't see PGF branded cards. It now makes a comeback with the RTX 30-series "Ampere." As with the older cards, these are being launched as China-exclusive. It remains to be seen if they reach Western markets.

Both cards feature a common board design with a large triple-slot, triple-fan cooling solution that's dunked in RGB LED embellishments. Both cards feature exotic VRM components such as multi-phase capacitors for better electrical noise suppression. The RTX 3080 PGF comes with GPU Boost frequencies of 1770 MHz (vs. 1710 MHz reference), while the RTX 3090 PGF does 1755 MHz GPU Boost (vs. 1695 MHz reference). The RTX 3070 PGF runs up to 1785 MHz GPU Boost (vs. 1725 MHz reference), and there's even an RTX 3060 Ti PGF, doing 1725 MHz GPU Boost (vs. 1665 MHz reference).

NVIDIA, Samsung Strengthen Strategic Chip Fabrication Partnership in Deal

It seems NVIDIA and Samsung's partnership in bringing to life the green company's semiconductor designs isn't about to end anytime soon. Semiconductor analysts and insiders have said that NVIDIA and Samsung etched a new manufacturing deal on December 17th that still relates to the company's in-high-demand RTX-30 series graphics cards, which should see Samsung increase output - particularly at its Hwaseong plant - to sate the seemingly unquenchable demand from consumers and scalpers alike. The deal, which is roughly valued at "hundreds of billions won" will see Samsung double down on its 8 nm output for NVIDIA's latest gaming chips. This seems to put to rest speculation on an RTX 30-series redesign for TSMC's allegedly better 7 nm process - and according to the industry insiders, NVIDIA looked to Samsung specifically because of the need for "quick delivery of the chips".

This instills new life into Samsung's contract-based foundry business; according to market researcher TrendForce, Samsung's foundry business is expected to post a record $14.05 billion in sales this year, up 17.9% from 2019, as the company expands its client base not only through this and the previous NVIDIA deal, to Qualcomm Technologies Inc., Google, IBM, Cisco and China's Baidu. Samsung is accelerating its investment into EUV lithography in sub-7 nm processes so as to poach more customers and market share from industry behemoth and poster boy TSMC, spending 10 trillion won ($8.6 billion) to both improve technology and increase output on its foundries.
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